staringclown

brexit

31 posts in this topic

I figure that brexit deserves it's own thread now that it has actually happened.

 

  • Medved poses salient questions about Northern Ireland (and reopening religious divides.)
  • Scotland's decision to stay in the UK is called into question.
  • Every other nationalistic movement in Europe has been emboldened
  • General chaos ensuing globally.
  • How Aussie house prices will be affected.  :huh:  :rolleyes:

I actually thought big money would win the day. I'm now emailing the peeps I argued exactly that opinion to in the UK that told me brexit would win. I'm very curious to examine whether the UK will be punished in the same way as Greece has been threatened?

 

If they aren't penalised heavily then how ever can the EU survive? Trouble is the EU also need the UK? Interesting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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This may be the first domino to fall. Geert Wilders is calling for a "Nexit" vote in the Netherlands, I understand Marine Le Pen may push for a similar vote in France.

 

It is a splintering of the EU and may result in a complete break-up. The powers-that-be though will fight tooth and nail to keep the union together.

 

My take is this is the start of a chain reaction much bigger than the UK leaving the EU; they don't use the Euro so it would be interesting to see a country ditch the currency and watch it burn up.

 

Personally I would have voted for leaving as the EU has so much bogus red tape. I read an article about Dyson and the issues he's had with EU regulators, he was dead keen to get out.

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This may be the first domino to fall. Geert Wilders is calling for a "Nexit" vote in the Netherlands, I understand Marine Le Pen may push for a similar vote in France.

 

It is a splintering of the EU and may result in a complete break-up. The powers-that-be though will fight tooth and nail to keep the union together.

 

My take is this is the start of a chain reaction much bigger than the UK leaving the EU; they don't use the Euro so it would be interesting to see a country ditch the currency and watch it burn up.

 

Personally I would have voted for leaving as the EU has so much bogus red tape. I read an article about Dyson and the issues he's had with EU regulators, he was dead keen to get out.

 

I agree. However, I'm undecided as to whether it is a rebellion against unfettered immigration or a rejection of globalisation generally. Anecdotally, I copped a lot of praise from the brexiteers I spoke to for Australia's border policy. Which would suggest the former.

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It's worth playing again. Solely due to his thorough misunderstanding of the common people...

 

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I read that Trump is the first presidential nominee that has alienated the white college educated. I don't really know how that fits the whole puzzle but I have feelings about it. Mostly along the lines of propaganda and critical reasoning. Enough time inflaming everything and eventually you get a good solid base of inflamed people. I kind of feel that maybe Trump took advantage of that within the republican base (no one else wanted to take the propaganda to it's logical extreme) but now he is up against an equally vehement base.

 

As far as I could tell there was no sensible reason to leave the EU and no plan on what to do except "stop the Poles" afterwards.

 

If this is the case then we are probably in for a lot more of these types of things. Hiding in insular Japan suddenly seems practical :)

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I read that Trump is the first presidential nominee that has alienated the white college educated. I don't really know how that fits the whole puzzle but I have feelings about it. Mostly along the lines of propaganda and critical reasoning. Enough time inflaming everything and eventually you get a good solid base of inflamed people. I kind of feel that maybe Trump took advantage of that within the republican base (no one else wanted to take the propaganda to it's logical extreme) but now he is up against an equally vehement base.

 

As far as I could tell there was no sensible reason to leave the EU and no plan on what to do except "stop the Poles" afterwards.

 

If this is the case then we are probably in for a lot more of these types of things. Hiding in insular Japan suddenly seems practical :)

 

I suggest your instincts aren't far off the mark. The technique has a long history of success. "Stopping the poles" was an overwhelming theme of the brexiteers I spoke with. My apologies and regards to the princess. I just wish that both Japan and Poland weren't so overtly xenophobic in their own right such that I could use them to combat the brexit bunch. 

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heh I was just up at the doctors for a fresh set of xrays and they were playing Camerons resignation speech. None of them even faintly knew why this was an important event. Japan's xenophobia is nothing compared to it's isolationism.

 

The Polish Princess has a favourite joke about the Poles in England.

 

Two Polish plumbers turn up to a job, start working away. Get the job done.

At the end of the day they catch the tube together and one says to the other <strong polish accent> I really have to give this job up.

The other says <strong polish accent> why? good honest work, good honest wage, food for babies!

The first <strong polish accent> It's too f*ckin' hard competing with those bastards.

The other <english accent> You're pretending too! oh lord I want out so much

 

Unfortunately it seems only rich countries can afford to educate everyone (if that is the root cause) and, it seems to me, that they will only get richer as a result. I loves the "None of the banks will leave if we exit" statement. I am sure the banks that have been rigging the libor are above moving for profit should the negotiations go badly. I was an EU negotiator I would be talking to those banks right now about what a prick I was going to be in the negotiations.

 

How in the hell can you negotiate from a position of weakness?

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30 years old and still relevant!  :laugh:

 

 

+1 An absolute classic!

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heh I was just up at the doctors for a fresh set of xrays and they were playing Camerons resignation speech. None of them even faintly knew why this was an important event. Japan's xenophobia is nothing compared to it's isolationism.

 

The Polish Princess has a favourite joke about the Poles in England.

 

Two Polish plumbers turn up to a job, start working away. Get the job done.

At the end of the day they catch the tube together and one says to the other <strong polish accent> I really have to give this job up.

The other says <strong polish accent> why? good honest work, good honest wage, food for babies!

The first <strong polish accent> It's too f*ckin' hard competing with those bastards.

The other <english accent> You're pretending too! oh lord I want out so much

 

Unfortunately it seems only rich countries can afford to educate everyone (if that is the root cause) and, it seems to me, that they will only get richer as a result. I loves the "None of the banks will leave if we exit" statement. I am sure the banks that have been rigging the libor are above moving for profit should the negotiations go badly. I was an EU negotiator I would be talking to those banks right now about what a prick I was going to be in the negotiations.

 

How in the hell can you negotiate from a position of weakness?

 

I had to go to Melbourne over the weekend where there was only one topic of conversation. Japan does sound peaceful.

 

I think you've hit the nail on the head regarding negotiations. Boris is now backtracking on the statements made prior to the vote and the websites with their claims have been wiped. According to Boris the UK will continue to have access to the single market without the burden of following to freedom of movement and EU regulations. He's sounding very Trump like.

 

There is now no urgency to lodge any formal notification to leave. I predict a long delay before the UK posts their article 50 and starts the exit clock (if it ever actually happens). In the mean time they will try to strengthen their bargaining position through continuing the instability. Essentially, an attempt at blackmailing a better deal. 

 

They risk a backlash from disgruntled brexit voters increasing the UKIP vote the longer it goes on. IMHO there will need be a general election in the next few months to avoid this. 

 

There seems to be similarities emerging to the Grexit in that the Syriza party that promised an end to the austerity completely backflipped. Maybe they'll use the election to override the referendum?

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I used to enjoy watching the series. Both Thatcher & Whitlam were fans of it. I suspect that it closely imitated reality.

The video clip has gone viral:

 

How Yes Minister predicted Brexit

Why Britain Joined the EU Back in 1973

 

 

Me too. I went to see the Yes Prime Minister play a couple of years ago. Same writers as the original but covering more recent topics like austerity and the GFC. Not quite as good as the original series.

 

It is regarded as a documentary within the APS.

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Training material for new staff?!

 

 

:laugh: Possibly for the senior executive. The majority still labour under the illusion that frank and fearless advice is still a requirement of service. Obviously, this gets kicked out of you as you rise...

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When the Minister is inundated with correspondence, Bernard offers to take it off his hands by sending “official replies”.

Bernard: “I’ll just say, ‘The Minister has asked me to thank you for your letter’ and something like ‘The matter is under consideration’, or even ‘under active consideration’.”

Hacker: “What’s the difference?”

Bernard: “Well, ‘under consideration’ means we’ve lost the file, ‘under active consideration’ means we’re trying to find it.”

:laugh:

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My favourite...

 

 

James Hacker: How am I going to explain the missing documents to "The Mail"? 

Sir Humphrey Appleby: Well, this is what we normally do in circumstnces like these. 

James Hacker: [reads memo] This file contains the complete set of papers, except for a number of secret documents, a few others which are part of still active files, some correspondence lost in the floods of 1967... 

James Hacker: Was 1967 a particularly bad winter? 

Sir Humphrey Appleby: No, a marvellous winter. We lost no end of embarrassing files. 

James Hacker: [reads] Some records which went astray in the move to London and others when the War Office was incorporated in the Ministry of Defence, and the normal withdrawal of papers whose publication could give grounds for an action for libel or breach of confidence or cause embarrassment to friendly governments. 

James Hacker: That's pretty comprehensive. How many does that normally leave for them to look at? 

James Hacker: How many does it actually leave? About a hundred?... Fifty?... Ten?... Five?... Four?... Three?... Two?... One?... *Zero?* 

Sir Humphrey Appleby: Yes, Minister.

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The UK stock market has exceeded the level it was before the Brexit vote.

The GBP has dropped 10% against other major currencies. This devaluation will offset a lot of the potential 10% EU tariffs if the UK doesn't get a trade deal. In the meantime exports to other countries will get a big boost.

UK exports to the EU is 47% of total global exports.

I think the UK will do fine economically with Brexit.

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The UK stock market has exceeded the level it was before the Brexit vote.

The GBP has dropped 10% against other major currencies. This devaluation will offset a lot of the potential 10% EU tariffs if the UK doesn't get a trade deal. In the meantime exports to other countries will get a big boost.

UK exports to the EU is 47% of total global exports.

I think the UK will do fine economically with Brexit.

 

 

I'm reserving judgement until they actually pull the trigger to leave. 

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fiver-and-coins-425x265.jpg


THE UK’s exit from the EU means the welcome return of the thru’penny bit and the half-crown, it has been confirmed.


Since 1971 Britain has laboured with a hateful foreign currency system the population has never fully understood. But that will all be forgotten next year when Britain returns to pounds, shillings and pence.


 

Roy Hobbs, 62, from Plaistow, said: “I can’t wait to get back to the simple old system of having twelve pennies to the shilling, twenty shillings to the pound, two groats to the farthing and six guineas to the Fahrenheit. 


“Like most people I have spent four decades being utterly baffled by the European madness of decimalisation. It flies in the face of common sense and resulted in everything costing far more than it should. 


“No wonder milkmen no longer whistle like they used to.”


Mary Fisher, 77,  said: “At last my grandson will be able to go out on Saturday mornings with a silver florin in his pocket and buy a furlong of liquorice and a quart of sherbet dabs for tuppence ha’penny.


“However despite leaving Europe last week we have not yet seen the return of opal mints, which is hugely disappointing.”


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:)

That should be OK as long as the UK doesn't change speed limit signs to furlongs per fortnight.

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A rush for the exits in UK property?

 

Property funds halt trading as Brexit fallout deepens

 

 

The fallout from the Brexit vote reverberated through the markets on Tuesday as two more City property funds barred investors from withdrawing their cash and the Bank of England warned that risks to the financial system had begun to “crystallise”.

 

 

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