cobran20

Wind and solar are crushing fossil fuels

72 posts in this topic

11 hours ago, cobran20 said:

https://phys.org/news/2016-01-carbon-dioxide-captured-air-methanol.html

probably what you meant. I actually thought I linked that article here a few months back when they did it but maybe I just meant to.

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South Australia to get $1bn solar farm and world's biggest battery

Mmm. I'm struggling to believe this comment:

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...The company says construction will start in months and the project will be built whatever the outcome of the SA government’s tender for a large battery to store renewable energy....

I think they must know that public funds via a tender are likely to come their way.

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The thing that worries me about battery units is half-life/usable life. It's a big expense that will lose their efficiency/effectiveness over time.

That and the environmental impacts.

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12 hours ago, Mr Medved said:

The thing that worries me about battery units is half-life/usable life. It's a big expense that will lose their efficiency/effectiveness over time.

That and the environmental impacts.

I still can't get past justifying the upfront costs, let alone the real life expectancy of the batteries.

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A good report on Four Corners last night. Everybody except the government now supports a carbon price to support investment in the sector. Even the bullsh*t "clean coal" requires a price signal to make investment viable. 

http://www.abc.net.au/4corners/stories/2017/05/08/4663424.htm

I saw a piece on small scale solar rooftop investment. This site uses a crowd funding model. The business (a bakery) uses more power (through refrigeration) when the power is being produced. The power costs for the business are reduced and the investors receive about 7% pa return. I still have a few questions regarding the capital return but just thought it was an interesting model for small scale investments in renewables. Another site here has more info

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Those 'feelgood' policies come with even more repercussions

SA plastics recycling business closes due to $100k hike in power bills

Quote

South Australia's sky-high electricity prices have forced an Adelaide plastics recycling business to shut its doors, costing 35 workers their jobs, its managing director says.

Plastics Granulating Services (PGS), based in Kilburn in Adelaide's inner-north, said it had seen its monthly power bills increase from $80,000 to $180,000 over the past 18 months.

Managing director Stephen Scherer said the high cost of power had crippled his business of 38 years and plans for expansion, and had led to his company being placed in liquidation...

 

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Google is now or almost purely renewable powered (DC & Ops). They use about as much as San Francisco. Probably just incompetence in Minnesota I guess.

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Just got a love letter from my energy retailer. Another round of large hikes in prices announced, effective January 1st. It is the second large hike in 12 months.

Most 'impressive' for a country that should have one of the lowest energy prices in the world! 

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Interesting comment added by what seems to be an engineer

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Today as I drove a couple of graduate engineering students to one of our work sites in a company Nissan Leaf I attempted to convey the concept of energy density to them.  Whilst the electric vehicle ticks all the right consumer boxes for its target market, it just doesn't stack up to hard analysis, much to their consternation.  You could tell that they wanted the facts to be different.

Here are some numbers I found that might help to convey the issue.

The energy density of oil is 35 to 45 gigajoules (10,000 kWh) per cubic meter. When measured using a unifying framework that allows comparison of non liquid/solid energy sources, solar energy for example has a density of 1.5 microjoules per cubic meter, over twenty quadrillion times less than oil.  Wind is significantly better (than solar) at around half a Joule per cubic meter, but only when it is blowing.

Why are these number significant?  With 5 people in the car in stop start traffic we consumed a third of its energy capacity in less than 25km of driving.  The dash display told us that it would require two and half hours to reach an 80% charge.  Even at 10 gigajoules per m2 a modest amount of petrol would give us a usable range of many hundreds of km and a refuel time of minutes.

A trip to Longreach with the family isn't ever likely to be viable with an electric vehicle in my opinion, most can't even tow a box trailer full of garden waste to the tip.

WIND DIES, VIC AND SA PAY

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On 4/6/2018 at 0:18 PM, cobran20 said:

Interesting comment added by what seems to be an engineer

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WIND DIES, VIC AND SA PAY

 

And are most trips in Australia to Longreach? Or are most to a destination within 25 km?

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1 hour ago, staringclown said:

 

And are most trips in Australia to Longreach? Or are most to a destination within 25 km?

People buy cars for driving around town and going away on holidays. The car has to be able to do both. Also if everybody starts driving EVs, then what is the reliable power source that will be used to generate that much power 24/7/365?

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54 minutes ago, staringclown said:

Not in the future I expect. The days of the kingswood are numbered.

So how do you perceive for people to go on holidays within Australia? Do you really expect for public transport to cover every single place that people want to go?

Perhaps we can have a green dictatorship that tells what where we're allowed to go and what we're allowed  to do!

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On 4/15/2018 at 5:37 PM, cobran20 said:

So how do you perceive for people to go on holidays within Australia? Do you really expect for public transport to cover every single place that people want to go?

Perhaps we can have a green dictatorship that tells what where we're allowed to go and what we're allowed  to do!

I perceive that people will hire vehicles for long trips where the destination isn't serviced by airlines. As fuel prices and TCO for vehicles rises it will become less economical to own your own vehicle. I drive long distances about 5-6 times per year to places that don't have flights that are economical. (Mostly regional areas like Mildura and Gippsland) I will generally fly to Sydney/Melbourne 5-6 time a year. I take my 4WD out 10 or so time per year for trips < 100km. Four wheel driving is not a poor mans recreation. 80K setup costs for me and in spite of the number of bull bars you may see around there are not that many people out on the tracks (at least around the places we go) Farmers likely need 4WD but there are tax deductions for commercial use. 

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12 hours ago, staringclown said:

I perceive that people will hire vehicles for long trips where the destination isn't serviced by airlines. As fuel prices and TCO for vehicles rises it will become less economical to own your own vehicle. I drive long distances about 5-6 times per year to places that don't have flights that are economical. (Mostly regional areas like Mildura and Gippsland) I will generally fly to Sydney/Melbourne 5-6 time a year. I take my 4WD out 10 or so time per year for trips < 100km. Four wheel driving is not a poor mans recreation. 80K setup costs for me and in spite of the number of bull bars you may see around there are not that many people out on the tracks (at least around the places we go) Farmers likely need 4WD but there are tax deductions for commercial use. 

Whether fuel prices rise substantially or not will most likely be a government policy rather than a supply&demand issue. So it boils down to what government gets voted in (and then out!).

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