zaph

Chilli sauce recipe?

9 posts in this topic

I've got a chilli plant that is producing fruit much faster than I can use it. So far I've just been drying the Chillies for use in the future. I've now got enough dried fruit to last a nuclear holocaust. 

 

But does anyone have a recipe for chilli sauce? I need a recipe that dilutes the hotness - these are ring burning chillies. 

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It depends on the type of chillis you have. If you have the fleshy sort (Jalapenos) then just pickle them in vinegar. Vinegar, sugar, onions all take away a bit of the heat.

 

Otherwise harissa is a good one.

 

http://www.thekitchn.com/how-to-make-harissa-cooking-lessons-from-the-kitchn-190188

 

 

Makes about 1 cup

 

What You Need

Ingredients
4 ounces dried chiles of your choice (see Recipe Notes)
1 teaspoon caraway seeds
1 teaspoon coriander seeds
1 teaspoon cumin seeds
3 to 4 garlic cloves, peeled
1 teaspoon kosher salt, or to taste
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, plus more for storing
Optional additions: fresh lemon juice, preserved lemon, fresh or dried mint, fresh cilantro, sun-dried tomatoes, tomato paste, cayenne, paprika

Equipment
Heatproof bowl for soaking chiles
Skillet for toasting spices
Spice grinder, coffee grinder, or mortar and pestle for grinding spices
Knife for stemming and seeding chiles
Gloves for stemming and seeding chiles (optional but recommended)
Food processor or mortar and pestle for mixing paste
Airtight jar for storage

Instructions
  1. Soften the chiles. Place the chiles in a heatproof bowl and cover with boiling water. Let stand for 30 minutes. 
  2. Toast the spices. While the chiles are soaking, toast the caraway, coriander, and cumin in a dry skillet over low-medium heat, occasionally shaking or stirring to prevent burning. When the spices are fragrant, remove them from the pan. 
  3. Grind the spices. Grind the spices in a mortar and pestle, spice grinder, or coffee grinder. 
  4. Drain the chiles. Drain the chiles, reserving the liquid for step 7. 
  5. Stem and seed the chiles. Remove and discard the stems and seeds from the chiles. (Wearing gloves is optional but recommended to protect your hands.) 
  6. Combine the chiles with spices, garlic, and salt. Combine the chiles, ground spices, garlic, and salt in the bowl of a food processor. (You can also use a mortar and pestle.) 
  7. Make a paste.
    With the food processor running, slowly drizzle in the olive oil and process to form a smooth and thick paste. Scrape down the sides of the bowl occasionally. If a thinner paste is desired, blend in a little of the chile soaking liquid until the paste has reached your desired texture.
  8. Taste and adjust seasonings. The flavor of the harissa will deepen over the next day or two, but you can taste it now and add more salt or other optional ingredients to your liking. 
  9. Top with olive oil and store. Transfer the harissa to a jar and cover the surface with a thin layer of olive oil. Cover the jar and refrigerate for up to a month, adding a fresh layer of olive oil on the top each time you use the harissa. 

 

So is chilli jam

 

 

 

  • 6 long fresh red chillies, coarsely chopped
  • 1 brown onion, coarsely chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped
  • 125ml (1/2 cup) water
  • 450g (2 cups) white sugar
  • 80ml (1/3 cup) white wine vinegar
  • 1 lime, juiced
  • 1 teaspoon fish sauce (see note
  •   Step 1                Process the chilli, onion, garlic and water in a food processor until finely chopped.
  1. Step 2

    Transfer to an 18cm (base measurement) saucepan. Add the sugar, vinegar, lime juice and fish sauce. Stir over medium-low heat until the sugar dissolves.

  2. Step 3

    Increase heat to medium-high and bring to the boil. Reduce heat to medium-low and simmer for 35-40 minutes or until the jam jells when tested (see tip). Spoon the hot jam into clean, dry jars. Seal. Invert for 2 minutes. Set aside to cool.

 

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I don't know where I would get Kosher salt, so may just stick with the jam recipe. Thanks for the tips. 

Edited by zaph

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It depends on the type of chillis you have. If you have the fleshy sort (Jalapenos) then just pickle them in vinegar. Vinegar, sugar, onions all take away a bit of the heat.

 

The fruit are only about 1cm long! - one does a dish for two warm, 2 a hot dish, 3+ ring burning!

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I don't know where I would get Kosher salt, so may just stick with the jam recipe. Thanks for the tips. 

Kosher salt is just american for non iodised salt really. Basically that salt that is in grains rather than a powder is probably what you are after.

 

The main reason for specifying it is because you can use it by feel (half a handful etc) rather than using a shaker I think. Shouldn't be a noticeable difference in flavour unless you can taste trace amounts of iodine however if the recipe specifies kosher salt then adjusting the measurement will be tricky (especially the first time) because powdered salt obviously packs into a teaspoon much more efficiently than the grains, I remember someone telling me there was a rough and ready formula but I like using the grains as it feels cooler, measuring is for pastry chefs!

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Well I just stuck the chilli fruit with some vinegar, sugar, onions, tomatoes, garlic and what ever else I thought should go in. It's very hot, so can't actually determine how good it is - will have to take it to hot chilli eaters to determine it's worth. 

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They sound like birds eye chillis. Those suckers are insanely hot. :)

 

I grew some ghost chillis this year and I'm not exactly sure what to do with them. They are in the freezer awaiting a decision. I thought about making capsicum spray rather than attempting to actually eat them.

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They sound like birds eye chillis. Those suckers are insanely hot. :)

 

I grew some ghost chillis this year and I'm not exactly sure what to do with them. They are in the freezer awaiting a decision. I thought about making capsicum spray rather than attempting to actually eat them.

Yes they are birds eye's.

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I ended up making Chile sauce. Mixture of the warm and white hot chillies, prepared according to Google. Mixed in with tinned tomatoes, and anything else I had that seemed like a sensible idea. Even with that dilution they burned twice. Made 4 bottles, gave away three, kept one. After three months mine's got no microbe problems.

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