Dose

Fairfax: The Yellow Peril is upon us

511 posts in this topic

Having said that, there's a very busy Asian grocer in the area (If you're ever in Brisbane let me know and I'll tell you where - mud crabs for $20!) that must turnover millions a year and has done for years. They only accept cash, but everything is scanned and you get an itemised receipt. If they're laundering money they're not very smart. In general I think Chinese just like cash.

A lot of places here don't take cards, many of the places that do won't take foreign cards or cards from mostly virtual banks (local variations of the ING idea).

 

I think for the Japanese paperwork is just a normal thing so paying with paper fits the psyche well. Cabs still fill in hard copy run sheets as they work despite having GPS on their dash.

 

Many of the people I order armour from only take orders in person or... by... FAX!!!

 

The ground floors of the offices I walk past are invariably full of cubicles of people with folders and paper all over their desks.

 

You can buy a new fax machine here easier than a new pc... I refuse to buy one and don't have a phone line anyway (I don't think).

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I asked an ex-Toyota executive in I.T. about the paper obsession in Japan. He said it's got to do with the ageing population and that in 20 years things will probably be different.

 

FWIW I'm a cash guy and I have no money to launder. And I'm not Japanese.

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That is my hope. As they move to office automation people with database skills _and_ japanese skills are going to be in high demand.

 

Hoping it will be a reprise of the late 90's :)

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...They advertise themselves as one-stop shops: property developers with managed funds and high-end migration services attached.

But a Fairfax Media investigation has raised questions about what these companies actually offer.

A leading Sydney architect says Maxfield misused his identity. A home used to advertise Luxeland's local building business is, in fact, in Buenos Aires. Scant detail is provided about the professional backgrounds of key staff and projects supposedly worth hundreds of millions of dollars....

 

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I just had the usual knock on the door from a REA offering a valuation. In the last two weeks I've had plenty of knocks, so they're either short of stock here, or are hiring a lot of new agents (new agents do the canvassing). I live in an area with lots of Asian people. 

 

He told me that new laws were coming in on 1 July that would prevent non-residents from buying established property and they could only buy new. He claimed that previously non-residents could buy anything. Foreigners were rushing to buy and they were rushing to sign up vendors to meet the demand.

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I just had the usual knock on the door from a REA offering a valuation. In the last two weeks I've had plenty of knocks, so they're either short of stock here, or are hiring a lot of new agents (new agents do the canvassing). I live in an area with lots of Asian people. 
 
He told me that new laws were coming in on 1 July that would prevent non-residents from buying established property and they could only buy new. He claimed that previously non-residents could buy anything. Foreigners were rushing to buy and they were rushing to sign up vendors to meet the demand.

 

Not new laws ,,, perhaps the existing laws will be enforced for a change!

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Not new laws ,,, perhaps the existing laws will be enforced for a change!

I realised there are no new laws but the ATO/FIRB must have the agents scared. Either that or it's just a scam to get foreigners to buy 'before the deadline'.

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Chinese money is also focusing on primary producing assets. Presumably so that they grow the products here and sell it in China. The profits will be retained in Chinese hands. So exactly how much do these foreign ventures add to the local economy, since they don't look very labour intensive?

 

link

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My son had his first group piano lesson today. All the other students and parents were Asian, as is the teacher. Forgot to ask them if they care about dwelling sizes, the number four, or if they have suitcases full of cash.

 

To be honest such a conversation would have been as pointless as that article.

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All the Domainfax news websites now have the property "articles" as the second top section before news about the election and business. It tells a bit about their priorities...

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The program refers to Vancouver, but it would be similar for Australian cities

 

Dateline

 

This like the Dateline segment on Vancouver last night. The locals have no hope.

 

link

 

 

... it was sold to a Chinese buyer through Jellis Craig agents Iain Carmichael and Genevieve Hoyle.

 
They said that the sale showed a very full price.
 
A Chinese bidder walked in for the first time 20 minutes before the auction started and didn't even have a chequebook on him, which he got delivered to the house....

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Just a funny thing I noticed while learning japanese kanji. 増means "increase" and the constituent parts are "land" and "formerly"

 

Needless to say that the mnemonic "it FORMERLY was just LAND but now it has INCREASED in value" works well for me having lived in Australia.

 

The funny thing, to me, is that it is (basically) the recommended mnemonic and it is an old old old character.

 

When people in Australia bitch about the idea that "real estate always goes up" they should at least be happy that the word for "increase in value" is not a reminder that real estate does :)

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Heh, not sure the Japanese agree that real estate doubles in price every seven to ten years.

 

Speaking of Japanese, I was at a conference yesterday. One of the speakers worked for Toyota in Japan for a few years and stated things are so much cooler in a foreign language.

 

In Toyota they follow a concept of leveling production, which in Japanese is "Heijunka". So in the West Lean practitioners use the term Heijunka instead of "level production".

 

He visited a plant in Japan and was attempting to read one of the boards (which happened to be for Heijunka). He discovered the katakana said "Leveling Board" in Japanese, so the locals prefered to use a borrowed word from English which was borrowed from Japanese. It did amuse my feeble brain. :)

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