AndersB

Rise of the Machines

34 posts in this topic

IBM Watson Gets Call Center Job

http://www.informati...r-job/240155321

IBM puts supercomputer Watson to work in ROBOT CALL CENTRE: AI goes to war with angry customers human staffers

http://www.theregist...stomer_service/

Robots: When will they take your job?

http://www.linkedin....y-take-your-job

...

  • Pilots: We know that autopilots have been assisting pilots to fly planes for many years. However, the latest commercial airlines are now able to fly the plane unaided. They can take off and land you safely (and arguably more safely than humans as most air disasters are down to human error). We just have to look at the military where now unmanned aircrafts (so called drone) are taking over. Fighter jet pilots will be Air Force history soon.

  • Doctors: Robots are already assisting surgeons to perform operations and doctors use large-scale databases of medical information to inform their decisions. However, soon robots will be able to make a diagnosis and perform operations without human input. Robots could scan your body and then based all previous medical knowledge (as well as data on your own medical history, DNA code, etc.) make a solid diagnosis and even remove a brain tumor with better results than even the best brain surgeon could.

  • Call center worker: We all know about the irritating automated answering systems in call centers that give you options and then route your call to the supposedly right person. What we are now seeing is the rise of natural language systems that are able to have a conversation with humans. IBM has developed Watson – a computer that recently challenged two of the all-time best Jeopardy! players. Without access to the Internet, Watson won the game by interpreting natural language questions and answering back after analyzing its massive data memory (that included a copy of the entire Wikipedia database). This means that when you ring any call center you will always speak to the ‘right person’ – only that the person is a robot instead.

  • Journalist: A company called Narrative Science recently launched a software product that can write newspaper stories about sports games directly from the games’ statistics. The same software can now be used to automatically write an overview of a company’s business performance using information available on the web. It uses algorithms to turn the information into attractive articles. Newspapers of the future could be fully automated.

  • Manual Labor: Obviously, if you do any sort of manual or lower-skilled labor you should be worried as many of those jobs could be replaced without much underlying analysis or artificial intelligence capabilities.

...

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IBM Watson Gets Call Center Job

http://www.informati...r-job/240155321

IBM puts supercomputer Watson to work in ROBOT CALL CENTRE: AI goes to war with angry customers human staffers

http://www.theregist...stomer_service/

Robots: When will they take your job?

http://www.linkedin....y-take-your-job

[/color]

They'll get my job when they claw it out my cold dead hand (or become self aware and learn to program themselves. Hopefully after 2033 when I hit retirement :) )

I'm far more concerned about the gray goo nanobots.

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http://www.smh.com.au/business/automation-could-be-the-real-zombie-invasion-20141210-123tcm.html

Automation could be the real zombie invasion

December 10, 2014 - 9:23AM

JACOB GREBER

 

As many as half a million accountants, supermarket cashiers, secretaries, typists and bank tellers in what are largely white-collar jobs are threatened by automation, Department of Industry modelling shows.

 

However, growing fears that robots and artificial intelligence could cast millions from the middle-class into unemployment and poverty are overblown, the department's chief economist, Mark Cully, said.

 

The fact a large range of relatively high-skilled jobs were likely to be lost only supported the need for Australians and governments to embrace structural change that guarantees economic growth and prosperity, he said.

 

One of the greatest benefits of increased automation – even if its temporary impact on jobs is painful – was that it would lead to higher productivity, and eventually cheaper goods and higher disposable incomes.

 

"Just as it did during the Industrial Revolution, when the invention of the loom led to waves of unemployed weavers but cheaper clothing for the masses," Mr Cully said.

 

The findings, published on Wednesday in the inaugural Australian Industry Report 2014 brings an Australian perspective to an increasingly intense debate that has ranged all year in the US over the question of whether automation and advances in computer software are starting to displace white-collar, middle-class jobs for the first time in accelerating numbers.

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"Just as it did during the Industrial Revolution, when the invention of the loom led to waves of unemployed weavers but cheaper clothing for the masses," Mr Cully said.

:shocking:

So let me get this straight.

Masses of unemployed, who have cheaper clothes available, but because they aren't working, have no money to buy them!!!

That's progress......

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:shocking:

So let me get this straight.

Masses of unemployed, who have cheaper clothes available, but because they aren't working, have no money to buy them!!!

That's progress......

 

Don't worry. Until they invent machines that can wipe @rses. humans will have a job! 

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Obviously it was progress. We have better lives now than people before the industrial revolution.

 

My only concern is that in the past (industrial revolution, cars replacing horses etc) things happened in isolation and over a longish period of time.

 

Automation of a vast amount of current jobs, I think depends on one or two break throughs. Society might not be able to adapt fast enough and it will make the luddite outbreaks and so on look like nothing.

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Tor,

Just guessing but I would say the industrial revolution saw more significant changes to the labour market than anything we could see today.

Also the current labour market is more flexible to begin with, most people do not expect to be on one job for life. Prior to the industrial revolution people's entire families over generations kept the same occupation in the western world; hence names like smith, Taylor etc

Look at china industrialising today. Far quicker than Europe did. Many jobs have turned to dust and yet many opportunities have raisin in new jobs.

I don't think their is a brick wall when suddenly labour is not required.

I guess the issue is though that at certain times labour is in less demand and so the price of labour decreases.

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