staringclown

Posh Nosh

52 posts in this topic

sigh... can't wait for my youngest to outgrow his egg allergy... it really limits what you can do - well, not really, but it does cut off a lot of the avenues i want to go in. another 4-5 years and he *should* (that "should" has such an ominous ring to it) be over it. alas we can't say as much for his peanut allergy.

That must suck ... I have two who will eat anything (except the big one hates a lot of things and the small one won't eat breakfast under any circumstances). The little one virtually lives on allergens. Every time I have anything with egg in it, I have to cook an extra to allow for food stealage. And she's been known to eat peanut butter out of the jar with a spoon.

I'm the one with allergies but apparently haven't passed them on. My mother is allergic to a tonne of stuff. Obviously an easily diluted gene. I find my personal allergen in a LOT of stuff and often get people trying to force 'yummy' food onto me at dinner parties and so forth and don't believe me I can't have it so it must be horrific having a more common allergen to look out for.

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That must suck ... I have two who will eat anything (except the big one hates a lot of things and the small one won't eat breakfast under any circumstances). The little one virtually lives on allergens. Every time I have anything with egg in it, I have to cook an extra to allow for food stealage. And she's been known to eat peanut butter out of the jar with a spoon.

I'm the one with allergies but apparently haven't passed them on. My mother is allergic to a tonne of stuff. Obviously an easily diluted gene. I find my personal allergen in a LOT of stuff and often get people trying to force 'yummy' food onto me at dinner parties and so forth and don't believe me I can't have it so it must be horrific having a more common allergen to look out for.

it is a drag. fortunately his reaction to peanuts is not a severe or life threatening one. it's the egg allergy that cuts down on menu options. but we just recently found out that he wasn't allergic to poultry (were told it was a risk when he was still an infant) so for the first time in 4 years or so chicken is back on the menu. one surprising side effect of the egg allergy was that he is unable to get flu vaccines as they use something eggy in it (at least that's what they told us in japan). but all in all, considering all the horrible illnesses that are out there, one that makes him be a bit careful about what he eats and avoid eating out at dodgy restaurants isn't all that bad...

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I have never tried the food processor version, cooking for me is often trying to do hard things I guess (okay maybe cooking is just all ego based for me hehehe). I probably should try it.

Nah. Don't try it unless circumstances force it on you - someone needs to be out there doing things right, otherwise the whole world will be eating microwaved crap and not knowing any better.

One advantage to the pot version is it is easier to taste as you you add salt and stuff. I apparently have an appalling sense of taste so this is usually done by the person that has excellent taste.

For me food is all about the delicious. No ego, (or not much), just the magic of being able to put things together that transcend the sum of the parts. I don't use recipes much at all anymore, I just 'think' the flavours together in my head and make that - technique has become just a means to a tasty end.

I am kind of curious as to how/why you cook with 'an appalling sense of taste' - presumably you like what you cook?? So surely that makes it a difference of opinion between the cook and the diner?

I know someone who prefers her meat on the sweet side and adds sugar to stews etc - not my taste at all, but I respect the different preference if she cooks for me.

I think it was Stephanie Alexander who said that to learn to make creme brulee you really well you should deliberately over cook a few so you know just how far you can push it. Probably the same with this.

Ms Alexander nailed it on that one.

There is nothing like repetition to enable you to know your limits.

Deliberately pushing things too far is a great learning technique, assuming you have the budget that allows you to do so. This is not generally a major problem in commercial kitchens (at least the ones I have frequented), but can be in domestic ones.

I don't much like Ms Alexander, but she does know a thing or two about food.

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...For me food is all about the delicious. No ego, (or not much), just the magic of being able to put things together that transcend the sum of the parts. I don't use recipes much at all anymore, I just 'think' the flavours together in my head and make that - technique has become just a means to a tasty end...

As far skills go cooking is really the only one I have which people can look at and judge. It is nice to have people say you did a good job once in a while, hence the cooking being all ego for me now.

It used to be all libido, so one could say I am slowly maturing :)

I can't cook without recipes yet, what I do now is just read 10 or 20 recipes and then try and figure out what they were all aiming out.

I am kind of curious as to how/why you cook with 'an appalling sense of taste' - presumably you like what you cook?? So surely that makes it a difference of opinion between the cook and the diner?

I know someone who prefers her meat on the sweet side and adds sugar to stews etc - not my taste at all, but I respect the different preference if she cooks for me.

Oh I like what I make (except stir fries and seafood stuff) but my sense of taste is not particularly subtle so salt levels and so on can be a little up or down. Best to rely on her to check seasoning, especially for things like hollandaise where the difference can be very quick.

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... It is nice to have people say you did a good job once in a while...

Well you can forget all about that after you are married! ;-)

I can't cook without recipes yet, what I do now is just read 10 or 20 recipes and then try and figure out what they were all aiming out.

Yeah, this is a great technique and one which I have always used (previously paper-based), but which search engines have expedited considerably!

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I'm the one with allergies but apparently haven't passed them on. My mother is allergic to a tonne of stuff. Obviously an easily diluted gene. I find my personal allergen in a LOT of stuff and often get people trying to force 'yummy' food onto me at dinner parties and so forth and don't believe me I can't have it so it must be horrific having a more common allergen to look out for.

RE - or anyone else for that matter - Does your allergy happen to include lactose(dairy) and/or gluten(wheat)?

I'm asking because we are having a Major Sleepover Event in a couple of weeks and one of the guest kids has both gluten and lactose allergies (and is a vegetarian to boot) while another is a very conservative eater.

Lactose/gluten sensitivities seem to put cake, icecream and most junk food out of the picture.

This is causing problems in determining a suitable menu so that everyone will have something to eat, and we (as the hosting parents) don't go insane acting as personal short-order cooks for each kid.

Any suggestions will be gratefully received.

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RE - or anyone else for that matter - Does your allergy happen to include lactose(dairy) and/or gluten(wheat)?

I'm asking because we are having a Major Sleepover Event in a couple of weeks and one of the guest kids has both gluten and lactose allergies (and is a vegetarian to boot) while another is a very conservative eater.

Lactose/gluten sensitivities seem to put cake, icecream and most junk food out of the picture.

This is causing problems in determining a suitable menu so that everyone will have something to eat, and we (as the hosting parents) don't go insane acting as personal short-order cooks for each kid.

Any suggestions will be gratefully received.

well i'm sure you could probably find some soy based ice creams if you looked hard enough but i would opt for a gelato instead. go heavy on fruits, maybe make candy or caramel apples (dunno about if gluten will be found in caramel). but i have yet to meet a kid that won't scarf down a kilo or two of watermelon, so that would be the easiest suggestion for dessert. in japan there is an odd summer "tradition" where you blindfold the kid, spin him around, and set him on a watermelon with a big stick--sort of like the pinata thing, except with a watermelon and its sitting on the ground (on some sort of sheet) rather than hanging from a tree. the game continues till someone busts the watermelon wide open and then its the pigs to the trough time. good fun, but i would recommend using a relatively clean watermelon busting instrument.

in terms of the dinner, that would be a tough one. everyone likes pasta, i suppose, and that would be easy enough to manage. or burgers/veggie burgers/sausages on the bbq and corn on the cob--easier still and the kids can run around outside making themselves sick while you try to drown yourself in beer as you cook.

popcorn (pop your own from the seeds, not the microwave crap) should be fine for all (and cheaper than any other form of junk food)

or better yet, you take your kid away on a weekend trip for his birthday and then you don't have to invite the friends over. that's my preferred solution.

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well i'm sure you could probably find some soy based ice creams if you looked hard enough but i would opt for a gelato instead. go heavy on fruits, maybe make candy or caramel apples (dunno about if gluten will be found in caramel). but i have yet to meet a kid that won't scarf down a kilo or two of watermelon, so that would be the easiest suggestion for dessert. in japan there is an odd summer "tradition" where you blindfold the kid, spin him around, and set him on a watermelon with a big stick--sort of like the pinata thing, except with a watermelon and its sitting on the ground (on some sort of sheet) rather than hanging from a tree. the game continues till someone busts the watermelon wide open and then its the pigs to the trough time. good fun, but i would recommend using a relatively clean watermelon busting instrument.

in terms of the dinner, that would be a tough one. everyone likes pasta, i suppose, and that would be easy enough to manage. or burgers/veggie burgers/sausages on the bbq and corn on the cob--easier still and the kids can run around outside making themselves sick while you try to drown yourself in beer as you cook.

popcorn (pop your own from the seeds, not the microwave crap) should be fine for all (and cheaper than any other form of junk food)

or better yet, you take your kid away on a weekend trip for his birthday and then you don't have to invite the friends over. that's my preferred solution.

The watermelon idea is great, that one is in for sure!

I like the idea of going away for the weekend, too... but we did that last year ;-) not sure we could swing it again...

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RE - or anyone else for that matter - Does your allergy happen to include lactose(dairy) and/or gluten(wheat)?

I'm asking because we are having a Major Sleepover Event in a couple of weeks and one of the guest kids has both gluten and lactose allergies (and is a vegetarian to boot) while another is a very conservative eater.

Lactose/gluten sensitivities seem to put cake, icecream and most junk food out of the picture.

Like ^^ they said, fruit. Lots of fruit. Puree the stuff and make fruit slushies. Check the ingredients of those Allens (or natural confectionary company) snakes and jelly babies thingies if you need sweets, I swear they are just gelatin, sugar and flavours. Toffee apples are just fruit and sugar but if you've got kids coming of loose teeth age you'll regret that. Same toffee (just sugar dissolved in water and cooked on the stove until it thickens up) over popped corn is good too. You could probably make fairy bread out of gluten free bread, dairy free butter and 100s and 1000s. Look at the ingredients of corn chips and tomato salsa - that sounds like a combo you might be able to get a good result on but again, haven't specifically checked. You can get dairy free chocolate (choc doesn't have gluten in) but I don't know what you'd do with it. If it was an adult sleepover I'd be dipping strawberries in it :)

Main courses - avoid regular patties/sausages/processed meat like the plague, it is FULL of gluten. As is anything that comes 'marinated'. Make your own patties with gluten free bread and you'll be fine.

Mine is soy lecithin - I don't know if I can extrapolate that to soy oil or not, I never eat anything with soy oil in it and I'm not game to try. Soy protein, dairy and gluten I'm fine with, anything with more than a fraction of a gram of soy lecithin in sends me into a sneezing frenzy after an irritatingly long delay (which made it hard to work out what caused this). I literally can't have more than about 4 or 5 smarties, one chocolate frog or a timtam without regretting it severely in a few hours, and now they are putting it in savoury crackers too. I thought it was dairy for ages because soy lecithin comes hand in hand with chocolate, which tends to be high in dairy. Dairy free or organic chocolate tends to have obscene amounts of soy lecithin though :rolleyes: We buy Cadbury's old gold 70%.

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RE - or anyone else for that matter - Does your allergy happen to include lactose(dairy) and/or gluten(wheat)?

I'm asking because we are having a Major Sleepover Event in a couple of weeks and one of the guest kids has both gluten and lactose allergies (and is a vegetarian to boot) while another is a very conservative eater.

Lactose/gluten sensitivities seem to put cake, icecream and most junk food out of the picture.

This is causing problems in determining a suitable menu so that everyone will have something to eat, and we (as the hosting parents) don't go insane acting as personal short-order cooks for each kid.

Any suggestions will be gratefully received.

I stole this recipe :blush: But it is pretty similar to the one I make. I've include the bacon cos I'm not a vego but if removed, it is perfectly gluten free AFAIK. (Well according to the Vegetarian society at least) Lots of sugar (but it is a party right?) Serve them with chips (Potato is fine) or a healthier option would be corn tortillas and bean/salad wraps) Also cheapish for large groups.

Boston baked beans

Ingredients

2 cups navy beans

1/2 pound bacon

1 onion, finely diced

3 tablespoons molasses

2 teaspoons salt

1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper

1/4 teaspoon dry mustard

1/2 cup ketchup

1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce

1/4 cup brown sugar

Directions

Soak beans overnight in cold water. Simmer the beans in the same water until tender, approximately 1 to 2 hours. Drain and reserve the liquid.

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F (165 degrees C).

Arrange the beans in a 2 quart bean pot or casserole dish by placing a portion of the beans in the bottom of dish, and layering them with bacon and onion.

In a saucepan, combine molasses, salt, pepper, dry mustard, ketchup, Worcestershire sauce and brown sugar. Bring the mixture to a boil and pour over beans. Pour in just enough of the reserved bean water to cover the beans. Cover the dish with a lid or aluminum foil.

Bake for 3 to 4 hours in the preheated oven, until beans are tender. Remove the lid about halfway through cooking, and add more liquid if necessary to prevent the beans from getting too dry.

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1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce

This one might be iffy on gluten ... remind me to never get gluten intolerant :|

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This one might be iffy on gluten ... remind me to never get gluten intolerant :|

Yep Holbrooks has wheat and barley. Lea and perrins claim that they are gluten free but you might want to check the label in case.

Lea & PerrinsĀ® Worcestershire Sauce is cholesterol free, fat free, preservative free, gluten free and has 80% less sodium than soy sauce.

It really shouldn't have any if made in the traditional manner. howToMakeWorcester

The original recipe is closely guarded, but basically consists of anchovies layered in brine, tamarinds in molasses, garlic in vinegar, chilies, cloves, shallots, and sugar.

After rotting in a barrel for two years with periodic stirrings, the mixture is sifted of the solids, and bottled.

I feel for those poor souls that have to miss out on any type of food due to an allergy. I worked with a woman who was told she was a coeliac and ate the rice pasta etc (at great expense I might add) only to be told she didn't have it after about 18 months.

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I stole this recipe :blush: But it is pretty similar to the one I make. I've include the bacon cos I'm not a vego but if removed, it is perfectly gluten free AFAIK. (Well according to the Vegetarian society at least) Lots of sugar (but it is a party right?) Serve them with chips (Potato is fine) or a healthier option would be corn tortillas and bean/salad wraps) Also cheapish for large groups.

Yum. Sounds delicious, too good for the likes of them!

Since most kids seem to like anything wrapped in something else I think this one is in, too, minus the bacon but with the corn tortillas.

Thanks for all the great ideas, they are much appreciated.

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I have had a Korean couple staying for the past week. smile.gif It has been an interesting week culinary wise. I had this bizarre dish last night. (But tasty)

Korean rice cake with fish cake and sesame leaves

1 kg korean rice cake

1/2 kg korean fish cake

2 cloves garlic

2 Tbsp red chilli bean paste

soy sauce to taste

1 tsp sesame oil

20-30 sesame leaves

Stir fry the rice and fish cake with the chilli bean paste and garlic

Add soy sauce and sesame oil and sesame leaves

done.

It was weird because the rice and fish cake were extruded from a machine and had a totally unnatural look (cylindrical shape)

Completely manufactured. Like space food.

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I have had a Korean couple staying for the past week. smile.gif It has been an interesting week culinary wise. I had this bizarre dish last night. (But tasty)

Korean rice cake with fish cake and sesame leaves

1 kg korean rice cake

1/2 kg korean fish cake

2 cloves garlic

2 Tbsp red chilli bean paste

soy sauce to taste

1 tsp sesame oil

20-30 sesame leaves

Stir fry the rice and fish cake with the chilli bean paste and garlic

Add soy sauce and sesame oil and sesame leaves

done.

It was weird because the rice and fish cake were extruded from a machine and had a totally unnatural look (cylindrical shape)

Completely manufactured. Like space food.

Space food is a good description, that stuff is so un-foodlike that it has it's own appeal. I used to hate Korean food but I am gradually coming around. I had a Kimchi Epiphany, which helped a lot.

What are sesame leaves?? Were do you get them?

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Space food is a good description, that stuff is so un-foodlike that it has it's own appeal. I used to hate Korean food but I am gradually coming around. I had a Kimchi Epiphany, which helped a lot.

What are sesame leaves?? Were do you get them?

Apologies Ruffian, Haven't been down here for a while. I get the sesame leaves from a korean market in Civic here in Canberra. I have a choice of two so Adelaide must have one. They are the leaves of the sesame tree? post-106-12683956868561_thumb.jpg

They have a unique flavour which is hard to describe. Like trying to describe truffles. Not at all unpleasant though.

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The further adventures of the bourgeoise renter...

Main:

Tornedos and bearnaise sauce, potato roesti, the essence of mushrooms, dutch carrots in honey and mint and steamed asparagus spears.

post-106-020803900 1290860285_thumb.jpg

Desert:

Pavlova with mango and passionfruit, and vanilla flavoured mascapone.

post-106-067341000 1290860356_thumb.jpg

Keep your shirt on. We was celebrating my upcoming birthday. Forget restaurants and stay frugal. This cost me < $60. Wine extra.

Edit: That was under $60 for two of these puppies.

Edited by staringclown

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The further adventures of the bourgeoise renter...

Main:

Tornedos and bearnaise sauce, potato roesti, the essence of mushrooms, dutch carrots in honey and mint and steamed asparagus spears.

post-106-020803900 1290860285_thumb.jpg

Desert:

Pavlova with mango and passionfruit, and vanilla flavoured mascapone.

post-106-067341000 1290860356_thumb.jpg

Keep your shirt on. We was celebrating my upcoming birthday. Forget restaurants and stay frugal. This cost me < $60. Wine extra.

Edit: That was under $60 for two of these puppies.

looks fantastic. i have a lot more envelope to push... i have been getting lazy lately and just falling back on standard dishes.

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The further adventures of the bourgeoise renter...

Bernaise looks nice and thick. Handmade?

I am with urchin though. Recent months feel like I have been missing creativity in the kitchen.

I did get given a free copy of Hueys cookbook which I just finished reading and I do have some great new toys coming soon to play with, new kitchen should be finished end of Jan. Desperately hoping I can crank myself back into it and that this has just been the usual busy period at work making me somewhat plain and boring. Workload meant a stop to exercising too which probably accounts for the general malaise.

Oh and for anyone wondering I am not really a fan of Hueys cooking, have seen the show a few times and it always seems a bit naff. His book Bloody Good Recipes is quite good though. Each recipe is preceded with a bit of a blurb and general waffle, then the recipe then a page of modifications that can be done with it. Sort of a master recipe with 10 variations idea which I quite liked. From memory there were a few things in there I figured I would try.

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Bernaise looks nice and thick. Handmade?

I am with urchin though. Recent months feel like I have been missing creativity in the kitchen.

I did get given a free copy of Hueys cookbook which I just finished reading and I do have some great new toys coming soon to play with, new kitchen should be finished end of Jan. Desperately hoping I can crank myself back into it and that this has just been the usual busy period at work making me somewhat plain and boring. Workload meant a stop to exercising too which probably accounts for the general malaise.

Oh and for anyone wondering I am not really a fan of Hueys cooking, have seen the show a few times and it always seems a bit naff. His book Bloody Good Recipes is quite good though. Each recipe is preceded with a bit of a blurb and general waffle, then the recipe then a page of modifications that can be done with it. Sort of a master recipe with 10 variations idea which I quite liked. From memory there were a few things in there I figured I would try.

Four yolks for the bearnaise and the 4 whites for the pav. I don't like waste.

Hueys OK. I went to his restaurant in st kilda once to meet a friend of a friend whom I was told I would get along with. He'd been drinking red wine since twelve and we met at 8. He did a face plant into his bangers and mash at 20 past eight and we've been friends ever since.

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Posh Nosh is back on iView for anyone that enjoys that particular sense of humour.

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Posh Nosh is back on iView for anyone that enjoys that particular sense of humour.

Oh yes please!

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Last Thursday after 24hours of failed power after Yasi, I dived into the thawing freezer, pulled out 3 Crayfish and made Lobster Mornay via torchlight.

Served on rice.

Next night was a Malay Prawn Curry, again on rice (cooked rice keeps in an Esky).

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Last Thursday after 24hours of failed power after Yasi, I dived into the thawing freezer, pulled out 3 Crayfish and made Lobster Mornay via torchlight.

Served on rice.

Next night was a Malay Prawn Curry, again on rice (cooked rice keeps in an Esky).

Have you got power back yet?

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Truffles! Was at the farmers market at EPIC this morning and managed to score some. $2.50 per gram. We asked for a 20 gram deal and the nice woman at the stall very kindly gave us an extra 13 gram truffle for free. :) No idea why.

Anyway I've never cooked them before, mainly due to lack of availability, but have had them in a few restaurants. They are not the most attractive thing. They look like the scats of some kind of small mammal.

I have had them with scrambled eggs, icecream and under the skin of roast chicken.

truffles.jpg

I was thinking doing of this recipe from the Canberra Times tomorrow night. :drool:

TRUFFLED CHICKEN BALLOTINE

This is the winning recipe in our truffle competition. It was submitted by Stewart Roberts, of Macquarie. You can watch him cook it on Saturday, June 23, at the Exhibition Park markets.

Serves 4-6

This recipe is a bit of a fiddle; but I figure anyone foodie enough to buy fresh truffles is up for some serious cooking. You can take care of the first five or six steps the day before if you like.

1.5kg free range chicken

1-2 red shallots, finely chopped

clove garlic, finely chopped

30ml Calvados

250-300g of pork mince

1/4 cup of pistachio nuts

1/4 cup of dried apple, finely chopped

small pinch thyme leaves

6-8 very thin slices of black truffle

1 teaspoon of finely chopped black truffle (use ends and rough bits of a whole truffle).

Debone the chicken, leaving the skin intact. This will take a while. Turn off your phone and put some music on. Season the inside with salt and pepper and set aside.

Sweat the shallots in a small pan for around 5-10 minutes until transparent. Add garlic and allow to brown slightly. Deglaze the pan with Calvados and allow to cool.

In a bowl, combine the pork mince, pistachios, dried apple, thyme and cooled shallots/garlic; and season liberally with salt and pepper. Work the mixture slightly by slapping it about in a bowl - you want to make it bind a little bit without getting tough. Set aside.

Take the deboned chicken and gently break the skin away from the breast meat by sliding your fingers in underneath the skin. Carefully insert the slices of truffle under the skin, trying not to break them up. If you do, it's not the end of the world, but it won't look as pretty.

Lay the chicken skin side down on a double layer of clingwrap. Lay the pork mince mixture in the body cavity and fold the chicken up around it. Try to keep the meat inside the skin as much as possible. Wrap the clingwrap around the chicken and roll up into a sort-of sausage. Pop in the fridge to set for an hour or two (this will make the next step easier).

Take the "sausage" out of the fridge and truss it up with string or sillicone ties. You don't have to do this, but the end result will be so much prettier if you do.

Pop on a trivet in an casserole pot/dutch oven with about 1cm of water under it. Put into the oven at 180. When it's cooked, lift the lid and crank the heat up to 200C to crisp the skin. Take out of the oven and let it rest for at least five minutes (preferably 10).

Stewart Roberts, winner of the Canberra Times truffle recipe competition, cooks his truffled chicken ballotine at the Exhibition Park farmers markets.

While that's happening, pour the water from the bottom of the pot into a saucepan. Thicken with a little flour to make a thin gravy. If you need to, add some chicken stock for a little more volume. Add salt and pepper to taste. Remove from heat, allow to cool slightly and whisk in the chopped truffle.

Cut the ballotine into thick slices (Carve it at the table. Show a little class, ferchrissakes) and pour a little of the gravy over. Serve with seasonal roast veggies (Spuds, parsnips and pumpkin are all dead good at the mo').

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