tor

f*ck this country

89 posts in this topic

Definitely HK over Singapore if you're going Asia.

Pros vs. cons? Have you lived in Singapore before (or done business there)? Anecdotes to share...?

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Pros vs. cons? Have you lived in Singapore before (or done business there)? Anecdotes to share...?

I live in HK and have been many times to Singapore to stay with people who live there but have also lived in HK. I have investigated and asked lots of questions about the possibility of moving there because we have twice been told that was going to happen, but it didn't eventuate. I also have many friends here in HK who lived previously in Singapore.

Singapore is quite a nice place to live and is cleaner (air wise) and has a bit more space than HK in terms of the actual living areas. HK has a lot of green but living is quite compact with the space being walking trails over lots of green hills (most visitors don't see that part). The heat is relentless in Singapore but in HK you at least get some seasonal changes which are a welcome relief.

It seems pretty much unanimous among those that have lived in both that they prefer HK. It's just a more vibrant and fun place and definitely preferable for singles.I'm not sure about the stats but it certainly seems like there are a lot more single expats here. If you like a drink and want to meet people there are a multitude of little bars and restaurants where it is normal to turn up and start talking to the people sharing your table. Singapore appears much more family orientated and people complain a lot about the lack of good places to go out. Eating of course is good in both.

This could be a big incentive - No tax on alcohol in HK so you can buy wine from Australia and the rest of the world at very reasonable prices. Wine is very expensive in Singapore. Also better food ingredients here in HK. There's a supermarket called Great and it's great. You can get the best of the best from the four corners of the globe. It's not cheap but neither is Singapore for food. Generally I'd say food is cheaper here.

English is more widely spoken in Singapore so that could be advantageous employment wise.

The two places have similar tax regimes and are also keen to encourage entrepreneurs to start up businesses. I did a bit of investigation on starting a business here and it seems that if you can demonstrate that you're adding some value to the local economy and might employ people down the track then there are few barriers to entry. I'm not sure about the situation in Singapore but I do know a couple of people who have started businesses there so it's certainly doable. In terms of being employed by a firm, I think you need to be sponsored in both places.

I gather there are huge numbers of IT personnel over the border in China who will work for a knock down price but I would think many companies would prefer the skills of a western trained IT person who understands how western businesses operate - same as it is in banking and other fields. I guess it depends on your target market for work.

I'm sure that both would offer comparable business/work choices so maybe the decision comes down to which one has an available opportunity. However, work can't be the only consideration and socially I would highly recommend HK over Singapore, particularly for a single.

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The games people play...

Usually NSW raises lottery prices by five to ten cents per game every once in a while. On this occasion the state didn't go for raising its revenue by raising its game price but it went for raising its revenue by raising the minimum amount of games one can play. The gambled dollars might go up by 30% this week and the revenue for the state might go up by 15% this week.

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Australia is reaching new lows. One vested interest attacks another vested interest. When did the world realise that money can only be spent once?

http://www.smh.com.au/small-business/trends/retails-silent-killer-20120516-1yptg.html

They're right though. Housing has taken all the money. What can you do?

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Anyone else getting shafted by this govts ( :fyou: ) superannuation shafting ($25K cap)? :pooh:

I pay over $60K in tax eaxh year without remorse. Now the c*nts are coming after my retirement.

This captures the "Hobson's choice"

http://www.smh.com.au/opinion/political-news/abbott-bad-but-labor-is-worse-says-poll-20120603-1zq7m.html

http://www.smh.com.au/opinion/politics/leaders-neck-and-neck-in-plunge-to-bottom-of-unpopularity-pit-20120603-1zq50.html

In 2013 I'm going to vote for a right wing nut job driven by a lust for power. :sadwalk:

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I thought of this thread when I read the the front page of the Australian this morning about how some good people, who borrowed money for a property, got forgiven their debt after suing the evil lender when they couldn't make the payments.

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Hey tor... how did you go with the tax office and splitting with the ex amicably?

Still working through it all. Am down to 80K in ATO fines which have not been reversed which is good but have had the property settlement rejected by the courts which is tiresome.

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I thought of this thread when I read the the front page of the Australian this morning about how some good people, who borrowed money for a property, got forgiven their debt after suing the evil lender when they couldn't make the payments.

When you thought they could not top it they cover the entire saga again the day after for an entire page on the second section's front page of the paper.

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Had dinner with a guy who is a partner for this web site

The site publishes a free newsletter about structuring your tax affairs in lower tax jurisdictions. Nothing illegal AFAIK. Not applicable to PAYE. You need to pay a subscription to get more detailed information on "investment opportunities". Anyhoo he was an interesting fellow. His own speciality was merger arbitrage.

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