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mattau

Saving on your Grocery Bill

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Every week, I am confronted with the massive grocery budget that I spend, which amounts in the hundreds. Bigger families have it even tougher.

Other forum posts have talked about the increasing proces of gas, electricity and water bills, but grocery bills are getting higher too!

I think it helps to be strategic about your grocery shopping. For instance, use a shopping list so that you don't make impulse purchases. Also check out unit prices and compare those so you get a better deal per unit. Another trick is to shop later at night so that you can get late-in-the-day deals, such as for bread.

What tips do you have for saving money at the grocery shop?

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let the specials influence what you eat!

I generally only buy things that are on special, it is typically only some of the fresh produce that I buy when not on special because sometimes I need to get a key ingredient here and there. Gradually over time, I've stocked up on the packaged items that have a long shelf life when they are on special due to a brand promotion. This week for example, Bega Cheese has been on a promo special, so over the next week or two, meals will feature cheese!

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Seasonal vegetables? I bought limes for 2.98 kg today. ABS tells me veges are cheap at the moment. Butternut pumpkin < 2.00 kg.

Grow your own if you can. Better varieties and fresher. Best of all you know where they've been.

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The list in the article is a good one.

  • Stockpile non-perishables so that you almost always only buy during discount periods.
  • Buy at Vic Market or other cheap markets, much better than supermarkets both in quality and price.
  • Keep a track of any food that you throw out, and adjust your shopping that you don't waste any foods.
  • Make your own. You may find making your own foods is less expensive than processed foods, with the 'added' benefit of no additives.
  • Buy fresh foods that are in season and plentiful.
  • Stay away from Coles and Woolworths if you can help it.

And as staringclown said, if you can grow your own that is always a great option.

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The list in the article is a good one.

I agree, however there is another method and that is have an actual dollar budget. Years ago with one income we had a strict grocery budget (i think $200/week) which meant if there was a few unexpected or costly items (eg. bulk olive oil that lasts months) then something else got trimmed. You will eat a few lentils and rice meals sometimes but you will know what you are spending.

It's important to use cash or you will always spend more.

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[*]Stay away from Coles and Woolworths if you can help it.[/list

Avoid them, but only up to a point.

Both have significant loss-leaders at certain times of year, and then I ruthlessly buy cases of whatever it is that they are selling at half price, and that we use a lot of.

This can save a LOT of money. Just don't buy anything else while you are there :thumbsup:

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use a shopping list so that you don't make impulse purchases

There is a step before this.

Raising 5 children meant that groceries was our biggest budget item.

During a particularly tough period, my wife and I produced an entire month's menu - (All meals including after-school snacks)

This then required particular ingredients, which we purchased.

In particular, we ate a lot of mince related meals. (rissoles, savoury mince, sphagetti, lasagne, shepherds pie, etc)

We also ate a lot of stir fries, with more vegies than meat. (mainly chicken and lamb)

The first 15 years of my marriage, we probably only went to a restaurant, or dined out with the children (at that stage all that was available was fish and chips and KFC), a handful of times.

We also always cut fruit up into pieces - less waste. (Give a child a whole apple and see how often they eat the lot)

Desserts were normally ice-cream with fresh fruit. (Occasionally my wife would make dumplings - flour and water)

Never underestimate either how economical sandwiches are.

Hope that contributes something to this topic.

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Never underestimate either how economical sandwiches are.

This is really true.

Strategic sandwich usage is probably ploughing an extra $5k in to our mortgage per annum.

(I'm starting to hate them with a passion, but I have to admit that they do save money - a lot of money.)

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Avoid them, but only up to a point.

Both have significant loss-leaders at certain times of year, and then I ruthlessly buy cases of whatever it is that they are selling at half price, and that we use a lot of.

This can save a LOT of money. Just don't buy anything else while you are there :thumbsup:

i have enough toilet paper to survive dysentery for 6 months.

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I just picked up a small leg of ham 1.5kg for $3.50/kg = $5 from the supermarket + tomatoes for $1/kg.

I'm quite happy with that. Especially the ham.

It's weird that even now I earn a good wage I still get excited by the small savings.

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It's weird that even now I earn a good wage I still get excited by the small savings.

It's not weird. In the long run that's going to make you richer than the next man. That's a good thing.

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It's not weird. In the long run that's going to make you richer than the next man. That's a good thing.

Yeah, I'm earning more this year than last year, and I'm still looking for savings. I don't like paying the usual price for most things. I prefer the bargains.

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here in adelaide local foodland store has ad for cans of baked beans for 39c a tin, i went and grabbed a case of 24. may grab another case before sale is over. to store with my cases of cheesy macaroni. gotta try em out see if they are indeed eddiible

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here in adelaide local foodland store has ad for cans of baked beans for 39c a tin, i went and grabbed a case of 24. may grab another case before sale is over. to store with my cases of cheesy macaroni. gotta try em out see if they are indeed eddiible

Sorry to have to tell you SG;

Wooden cases are not eddiible, no matter how extreme it gets.

Unless you're a beaver, or a wood borer! :lol::thumbup:

(My weird sense of humour - and grammar sensitivity)

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