staringclown

Got wine?

47 posts in this topic

The long overdue wine thread.

I do enjoy a tipple on a hot day. But only ever in the strickest moderation. very-drunk.gif

Current favourites are WA whites.

Howard Park Sav Blanc, Voyager, Cape Mentelle, Capel Vale, Stella Bella and Leeuwin estate riesling I've always found top notch.

I went through a NZ sav blanc phase but I think I OD'ed on them and now drink them every other day. Huia, Isobel and Cloudy Bay are favourites. But there are so many.

Yarra valley Chardonnay in the clown household was huge for a while. I like the creamy malolactic fermentation chardonnays with lots of wood. :thumbsup:

Until I discovered mornington peninsula pinot noir. :drool: (Main ridge, stoniers, t'gallant to name a few)

Hunter valley semillons are excellent. Most notably Audrey Wilkinson and meerea park and de iulius but there's nothing wrong with mt pleasant.

Anyway enough for a first post. What are you drinking? (preferably accompanied by a some tasting notes) Don't worry if you sound a bit of a tosser. This thread is about being a tosser. It's about wine I wanna see the words used I've never associated with wine before. Go nuts. :)

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Flying Fox shiraz is one of my goto favourites for daily wine as recommended by the diet people.

Really dense and fruity. Has a cool picture on the bottle. About $15 a bottle.

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if you're visiting wineries in the canberra region clonakilla (presumably named after a clown-killing gangsta) makes a mighty nice bottle. we got a bottle of the ballinderry for a special occasion and it did not disappoint if you like a very full-bodied red. looks like you can order online now too... hmmm.... we tasted all they had out when we visited and *everything* was good...

http://www.clonakilla.com.au/index.php/

i'm still in my NZ Sauv blanc phase for the most part, though... will have to work on my pretentious bombast a little before i make another post.

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if you're visiting wineries in the canberra region clonakilla (presumably named after a clown-killing gangsta) makes a mighty nice bottle. we got a bottle of the ballinderry for a special occasion and it did not disappoint if you like a very full-bodied red. looks like you can order online now too... hmmm.... we tasted all they had out when we visited and *everything* was good...

http://www.clonakilla.com.au/index.php/

i'm still in my NZ Sauv blanc phase for the most part, though... will have to work on my pretentious bombast a little before i make another post.

I forgot about Clonakilla. The scourge of clownkind. If I ever catch up with that fellow I'm going to 'pop a cap' into his bottom. Canberra was underrated as a wine district but I think that is changing. It is pricier now it won some awards.

Or am I thinking of Brian Schmidt.

If you can work the words panacea and libidinous into a review you have my respect.

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jeir creek gets an honourable mention too--they are a lot less pricy than clonakilla but still quite good. got a few very nice bottles for around the $15 mark (needless to say they are but fond memories now) at the winery.

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Recently returned from a wine odyssey in Vic/SA. Visited Coonawarra, Barrossa valley, McLaren vale. Didn't get to the Clare valley. Ran out of time. :wine:

Coonawarra was nothing like I was expecting. It's just a long strip of red dirt. One metre deep oxidised limestone soil over a white limestone soil. The 'terra rossa' - when discussing coonawarra wine with anyone about be sure to throw in this term at least twice and if you're feeling confident utter the phrase 'unique terroir'. We stayed in the town of Penola which is at the bottom of the strip. St Mary McKillopp taught there and there is an archeological dig happening as we speak looking for the actual site of the school.

Went to Bowen estate and Wynns for tastings. Bowen has a nice Shiraz and a Chardonnay. The Chardonnay was quite woody which suits me. I was never fond of the unwooded. It was a attempt to compete with NZ sav blanc IMHO and I much preferred the rich french style. Yarra valley carried on the wooded tradition and real chardonnay has survived better than the unwooded fad.

The red is a big, peppery, mouth filling shiraz. Big tannins, big headache kind of stuff. Excellent for discussing world domination. Better to cellar for a few years to tone it down a bit. By that time the world domination discussion will involve less obvious violence.

Wynns is the earliest winery in the Coonawarra. Although Wynns bought out an earlier maker they were the first to start focussing on making quality table wines in the early fifties and are considered one of the visionaries of the wine industry here. At least that's what this cute little sth african girl was telling me at the cellar door and I wasn't in an arguing mood.

Bought some V&A (Victoria and Albert) lane (a side road off the main drag) 2009 shiraz. It can be drunk now. Less tannins and more fruit. Plum, chocolate and tobacco notes. Doesn't suck the moisture from your salivary glands like the bowen estate. Apparently if you cellar it till 2018 it will taste even better but I've already devoured our supply. Might need to order some more.

Haven't started on the Barrossa Valley or McLaren Vale stuff yet so I will reserve my comments until I have.

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had a couple of nice bottles of bunnamaggoo (which i bought because 1. they were on sale and 2. it has a funny name that reminded me of mr. magoo) the 2008 shiraz was very good, esp. for $16. I won't try to describe it, but if you like a wine with a lot of flavour and depth, you won't be disappointed. a 2009 (i think) bunnamaggoo merlot-shiraz-cabernet was good but not outstandingly so. they had run out of the shiraz but there were plenty of the merlot-shiraz-cabernets left, so i suppose that says something...

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This thread has tremendous potential at both ends of the scale!

As an introduction: I have a taste for big joosy reds and unwooded / sav-b whites. Regarding "value" I have no issue paying a bit too much to the guy who actually made the wine. That said the good "under $20 bottle" is always a nice, rewarding find. Very easy to get good wine by spending a lot but that is not nessessarily the goal, is it? Somebody told me they thought $20 was "a lot" for a bottle of wine. Everything is relative.

Study Material: Either (or both) of the James and Oz wine series .

Currently on heavy rotation: Jouney's End Cab Sav (Coonawarra)

I think a nice way to start is on the topic of Touring. Through equal parts good luck and design I have been able to autotour most of Australia's wine regions over the past 5 years. Good fun!

Coonawarra. Facinating in that the journey to get there and back can take longer than the time you spend there tasting! The Wine Gods determined that this strip of soil must be placed so out of the way to weed out the weak among us. Stayed at Must and had a really nice dinner at Pipers. Beautiful, all of it. The only problem is afterwards you have to drive home! This can be offset by a boot full of wine.

Advice: Sometimes they taste better at the cellar door. Buy one, take it home in a a month or so if you still like it then call the winery and have them ship more.

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This thread has tremendous potential at both ends of the scale!

As an introduction: I have a taste for big joosy reds and unwooded / sav-b whites. Regarding "value" I have no issue paying a bit too much to the guy who actually made the wine. That said the good "under $20 bottle" is always a nice, rewarding find. Very easy to get good wine by spending a lot but that is not nessessarily the goal, is it? Somebody told me they thought $20 was "a lot" for a bottle of wine. Everything is relative.

Study Material: Either (or both) of the James and Oz wine series .

Currently on heavy rotation: Jouney's End Cab Sav (Coonawarra)

I think a nice way to start is on the topic of Touring. Through equal parts good luck and design I have been able to autotour most of Australia's wine regions over the past 5 years. Good fun!

Coonawarra. Facinating in that the journey to get there and back can take longer than the time you spend there tasting! The Wine Gods determined that this strip of soil must be placed so out of the way to weed out the weak among us. Stayed at Must and had a really nice dinner at Pipers. Beautiful, all of it. The only problem is afterwards you have to drive home! This can be offset by a boot full of wine.

Advice: Sometimes they taste better at the cellar door. Buy one, take it home in a a month or so if you still like it then call the winery and have them ship more.

Hey I stayed at Must! How about that 70's besser block pub in the middle of Penola! The food was good but it didn't look it from the outside.

I didn't buy any cases cos I knew I'd be lugging it around the state decreasing my fuel efficiency. Taste and order online. Plus it's great receiving cases of wine in the mail.

I'm currently supping 2010 "Noon eclipse" from McLarenvale. Swapped with a work colleague for a Koonunga "seventy six"cellar door release recently garnered from Penfolds. :)

First time I've honestly tasted chocolate. 4 stars

I think for $20 you should be able to get "good" wine. Good wine to me is something that has a noticeable difference in flavour from the mainstream.

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I'm currently supping 2010 "Noon eclipse" from McLarenvale. Swapped with a work colleague for a Koonunga "seventy six"cellar door release recently garnered from Penfolds. :)

First time I've honestly tasted chocolate. 4 stars

Which is Chocolate...Noon Eclipse or Seventy Six? Interesting...

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Which is Chocolate...Noon Eclipse or Seventy Six? Interesting...

The Noon eclipse was the chocky one. I'll ask my guy where it can be got.

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Grange price battle heats up

Dan Murphy's has lowered its price for the latest Penfolds Grange 2007, dropping it to $479.99 this afternoon to offer the lowest local price for the iconic label.

This morning, Costco had trumped the major supermarkets in the battle to offer the lowest price, selling Grange for $489.99.

The US discounter revealed its pricing for the 2007 vintage after Coles said it would have a $499 price tag at its 1st Choice liquor outlet - a 20 per cent discount to the recommended retail price of $625.

Cut it out Dan Murphy. If you send Penfolds broke I'm comin' for ya!

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Grange price battle heats up

Cut it out Dan Murphy. If you send Penfolds broke I'm comin' for ya!

Evil bastard, Dan.

If he were truly evil we'd be looking at dollar beers. Warm.

Once you get past $60 / bottle for wine things get very confusing.

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Once you get past $60 / bottle for wine things get very confusing.

I choke on anything over 10 bucks.

If its wet, red and alcoholic, it will do.

Occasionally it can be wet, white and alcoholic as well.

$500 for a bottle of wine!!!

Does it come with a guarantee that its drinkable.

Such is only for people who have no idea how much sweat goes into earning that amount of money.

Sorry. You will never convince me its worth it.

I've always known I never belonged to the upper gentry.

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In the past goods and services were priced as cost plus margin. Today goods and services are priced as ability to pay which means they are sold anywhere between negative (below cost) and positive infinity. It is the power of valueless money.

Edited by sydney3000

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In the past goods and services were priced as cost plus margin. Today goods and services are priced as ability to pay which means they are sold anywhere between negative (below cost) and positive infinity.

Are you sure about that? In the specific case of grange I don't think that has ever been the case.

In a general sense I believe one of the basic principles of pricing has been supply and demand for the majority of (non mandated) pricing models.

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I choke on anything over 10 bucks.

If its wet, red and alcoholic, it will do.

Occasionally it can be wet, white and alcoholic as well.

$500 for a bottle of wine!!!

Does it come with a guarantee that its drinkable.

Such is only for people who have no idea how much sweat goes into earning that amount of money.

Sorry. You will never convince me its worth it.

I've always known I never belonged to the upper gentry.

I have to reply to my own post.

That's not to say I won't drink the $500 stuff, if someone else is offering it.

In fact, I often find that it has an extra sweet taste that way.

At one point in my life, all I could afford was cask wine.

One of my friends once labelled me; (after the 9th or 10th glass)

Cabernet de Card Boardet

Uncouth!

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I have to reply to my own post.

That's not to say I won't drink the $500 stuff, if someone else is offering it.

In fact, I often find that it has an extra sweet taste that way.

At one point in my life, all I could afford was cask wine.

One of my friends once labelled me; (after the 9th or 10th glass)

Cabernet de Card Boardet

Uncouth!

i think the most expensive bottle of wine i ever had was about $250... and that was at a restaurant so it actually probably only cost about $50... needless to say i was not paying :P.

there's wine and there's wine. after living in japan for 10 years, coming to aus. i was amazed at the quality of wine you could get for $20 and under. and with the exception of wedding anniversaries and xmas, i very rarely go over $20

precisely at the $20 mark are some white wines i bought at the affleck vineyard a couple of weeks ago on the way home from a day trip. by lake george (the sometimes lake) about 30 or so minutes north of canberra, i more or less randomly picked the vineyard and at the tasting the whites were really good--the reds not so much. bought a bottle of chardonnay and a bottle semillion sauv blanc for $20 each and they were very, very nice. one of them... the semillion? can't remember... had a strong taste of honey--almost meady--but it worked.

if you find yourself driving past lake george and see the signs for "lake george wineries" its worth stopping by for a taste.

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I guess I'm fortunate to have had Grange three or four times, different vintages each time, courtesy of a relative with more money than judgement.

It's certainly a fine wine; well structured in the classic Penfold's style... but is it worth the outlay?

Nope.

Call me a heathen, but I would never actually shell out my own hard-earned in order to drink it again.

It's slightly old-fashioned to my palate, too, a solid old-school shiraz with a bit of cabernet added for good measure.

Penfold's make a number of good wines, all of them identifiably that SA/Penfold's style, and all much more affordable.

St Henri is less than $100, and Kalimna or Bin 128 are about $30 - vastly better value if you ask me.

Incidentally, the Penfold's flagship, the original vineyard, which still grows the original shiraz grapes even though it is now in a sea of suburbia, is only a few km from here.

They do tasting flights there, and tours for well-heeled tourists.

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In the past goods and services were priced as cost plus margin. Today goods and services are priced as ability to pay which means they are sold anywhere between negative (below cost) and positive infinity. It is the power of valueless money.

I thought grange sold out every year fairly quickly. It is the iconic wine of australia. It may be expensive but the demand is there. Especially when you can snap it up for a mere $479 a bottle. :down:

I guess I'm fortunate to have had Grange three or four times, different vintages each time, courtesy of a relative with more money than judgement.

It's certainly a fine wine; well structured in the classic Penfold's style... but is it worth the outlay?

Nope.

Call me a heathen, but I would never actually shell out my own hard-earned in order to drink it again.

It's slightly old-fashioned to my palate, too, a solid old-school shiraz with a bit of cabernet added for good measure.

Penfold's make a number of good wines, all of them identifiably that SA/Penfold's style, and all much more affordable.

St Henri is less than $100, and Kalimna or Bin 128 are about $30 - vastly better value if you ask me.

Incidentally, the Penfold's flagship, the original vineyard, which still grows the original shiraz grapes even though it is now in a sea of suburbia, is only a few km from here.

They do tasting flights there, and tours for well-heeled tourists.

I thought seriously for a few seconds about getting a bottle. If only to confirm my suspicion that it is not 10X as good as St Henri. ($60 per bottle from the cellar door)

It's like easter eggs. When I was a child I would ask for blocks of chocolate rather than easter eggs. The bars were better quality chocolate at a cheaper price and there was more of it. Perfick. :)

I can't recall ever having had grange. Anyone want to form a syndicate? :wine:

I'll check out Lake George - thanks urchin.

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I seem to recall some wine guy or another saying that grange was a wood aged red wine and was therefore something most people weren't used to and wouldn't like. Sort of like if someone gave you laphroiag as your first scotch.

Unlike laphroaig there is apparently no easy way of building up that appreciation of the unusual flavours.

But I suck at wine.

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I seem to recall some wine guy or another saying that grange was a wood aged red wine and was therefore something most people weren't used to and wouldn't like. Sort of like if someone gave you laphroiag as your first scotch.

Unlike laphroaig there is apparently no easy way of building up that appreciation of the unusual flavours.

But I suck at wine.

Whilst I haven't had grange I have had plenty of wood aged, old fashioned reds. I believe it is the dominant style of the barossa if not the country. It seems to me that aging 'mellows' the wine significantly. If you buy big, saliva sucking reds from competent makers and cellar them you can luck in with investment opportunities but best of all you will have ready supply of good wine. So what I'm saying is that you can buy wine that may well be as good or better than grange. This is why should cruise quality wine shops chatting up the staff.

Is it a feasible theory that whatever flavours you are introduced to become the norm? (E.g. peaty whisky) After this taste can be acquired. I didn't like beer when I first tasted it but I have overcome the initial shock now. :)

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I seem to recall some wine guy or another saying that grange was a wood aged red wine and was therefore something most people weren't used to and wouldn't like. Sort of like if someone gave you laphroiag as your first scotch.

Unlike laphroaig there is apparently no easy way of building up that appreciation of the unusual flavours.

But I suck at wine.

I wouldn't really agree with that theory.

I've had - and enjoyed - both laphroiag and grange, and of the two, grange is way more accessible.

Anyone who likes a big red wine could easily appreciate grange, whereas you do have to kind of ease your way into laphroiag, no matter how much Johnny Walker Red you may have had previously. :laugh:

I also think that SC is right about wines that are as good, or better, being available to those who are canny and/or patient.

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This region produces exquisite Shiraz. Swoon inducing flavours.

http://www.heathcoteshiraz.com/index.html

Tassie Pinot Noir is quite nice as well.

Pipers Brook and Bay of fires pinot. You have to try mornington pinot (main ridge, stoniers) or even a bellarine peninsula (scotchmans hill)

I also think that SC is right about wines that are as good, or better, being available to those who are canny and/or patient.

Currently supping a Kaesler 2007 vintage "The Bogan". It has the same chocolate/tobacco notes as the noons eclipse Dose but is more available (Dan Murphys) $38 but a nice tipple.

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