Ruffian

Islay Malts

59 posts in this topic

I spent years loyal to Lagavulin and Laphroaig Islay whisky, got sh*tfaced one night, and went off them entirely - for a decade or so. Even just a whiff of peat put me off.

However, something clicked a couple of nights ago and I am suddenly back in the fray.

I will be able to pick a up a bit of duty-free in the next couple of months and would like to be able to buy strategically.

Anyone got any suggestions on what to buy to build up the basis of a decent collection?

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Bruichladdich is good. I had a bottle of a series they did with different casks. I think it was an 18YO. (I had champagne) but there was a bunch of others. A few highland distilleries are doing the same. Glenmorangie most notably. Another I tried was Caol Ila. 21YO and excellent.

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I spent years loyal to Lagavulin and Laphroaig Islay whisky, got sh*tfaced one night, and went off them entirely - for a decade or so. Even just a whiff of peat put me off.

However, something clicked a couple of nights ago and I am suddenly back in the fray.

I will be able to pick a up a bit of duty-free in the next couple of months and would like to be able to buy strategically.

Anyone got any suggestions on what to buy to build up the basis of a decent collection?

Ignoring all the special expressions I would go for:

Lagavulin; the king; but only a glass or two, water required.

Laphroiag a prince that can be drunk a few more

Ardbeg when you are a little angry

Bowmore when you are poor

not Islay but similar ish:

Scapa has more iodine and is your friendly uncle.

Talisker a bit sweeter

With those 6 any island lover would be happy I reckon. Buy more Scapa than you think. Non island drinkers will like it a lot.

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Lagavulin; the king; but only a glass or two, water required.

Laphroiag a prince that can be drunk a few more

Ardbeg when you are a little angry

Bowmore when you are poor

This is a certain kind of poetry. And unlike most poetry, addresses truth as well ;-)

not Islay but similar ish:

Scapa has more iodine and is your friendly uncle.

Talisker a bit sweeter

I agree re Talisker, used to like it alot. Haven't tried Scapa, but will certainly do so.

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Bruichladdich is good. I had a bottle of a series they did with different casks. I think it was an 18YO. (I had champagne) but there was a bunch of others. A few highland distilleries are doing the same. Glenmorangie most notably. Another I tried was Caol Ila. 21YO and excellent.

OK, will check the Br.. Brui... unpronounceable one out.

Not so keen on the highland distilleries, not sure why - it's probably a baseless prejudice - but I'm sticking with it for now...

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OK, will check the Br.. Brui... unpronounceable one out.

Not so keen on the highland distilleries, not sure why - it's probably a baseless prejudice - but I'm sticking with it for now...

Bruichladdich: Brook Laddy.

The only reason I don't include it in my "base" of island scotch is because they change their expressions every bloody week. I have had one or two that are nice enough but price wise and ability to buy it again if you like it is not there. If you like cool bottles (I have that weakness) they do have some great bottles.

Highland scotch is bland nonsense, that's why you are not so keen on it :)

(tell the truth there are a couple I do kind of like but if moving away from the islands I would stop in the lowlands first with a nice glenkinchie, has the sweetness of talisker minus the sea flavours I think)

Edit: Forgot to say I do like a macallan every once in a while which is highland. From memory they did a sherry cask once which was quite great, might have been a port cask.

Edited by tor

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Best

Thread

Ever.

I will consult with the peaty burned oil drum host and report back.

Not sure if I can afford an interest in this one. Perhaps the Gold Thread as a counterbalance.

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Bowmore when you are poor

that's what i used to think, but then i discovered that there is bowmore and there is bowmore. the scotch bar i recommended in the japan thread has all sorts of whiskies you never see in a regular shop. when i went i explained what kind of whiskies i liked and let him pick them for me. the first recommendation was a bowmore. i was rather disappointed when he said that, but the bowmore he gave me was really, really good. of course i have no idea what specifically it was (i had a good many more whiskies before i left).

in a recent trip to japan i discovered an 18 year old glenmorangie 18 year old in a 200 ml bottle--it was shockingly good & i've never been all that huge of a glenmorangie fan. i like the "i will kick your ass" smokiness of the lagavulin and laphroigs better. this was a lot more subtle but very rich, a lot of depth. man, i can't wait to get back to japan where i can buy whiskies at a reasonable price. a bottle of lagavulin in japan cost me ~70 AUD. for kicks i asked what it cost at a local shop & they said $160... meh. when in aus, drink wine i s'pose.

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that's what i used to think, but then i discovered that there is bowmore and there is bowmore. the scotch bar i recommended in the japan thread has all sorts of whiskies you never see in a regular shop. when i went i explained what kind of whiskies i liked and let him pick them for me. the first recommendation was a bowmore. i was rather disappointed when he said that, but the bowmore he gave me was really, really good. of course i have no idea what specifically it was (i had a good many more whiskies before i left).

In my defence I did say ignoring special expressions, bowmore is usually available in the younger expressions in Aus and is usually quite cheap. Not that cheap is bad, scapa is usually very cheap (when you can find it) and should be bought by the case when you do.

in a recent trip to japan i discovered an 18 year old glenmorangie 18 year old in a 200 ml bottle--it was shockingly good & i've never been all that huge of a glenmorangie fan. i like the "i will kick your ass" smokiness of the lagavulin and laphroigs better. this was a lot more subtle but very rich, a lot of depth. man, i can't wait to get back to japan where i can buy whiskies at a reasonable price. a bottle of lagavulin in japan cost me ~70 AUD. for kicks i asked what it cost at a local shop & they said $160... meh. when in aus, drink wine i s'pose.

Sounds like the scotch bars of japan are going to have a field day with me :)

Lagavulin in Aus I can normally get for 100 - 120. Even Dan Murphys is in that price range when they have it.

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Best

Thread

Ever.

I will consult with the peaty burned oil drum host and report back.

Not sure if I can afford an interest in this one. Perhaps the Gold Thread as a counterbalance.

When I have been poor I have had the habit of buying a cheap blended (although Cardhu used to be about the same as Johnny Walker Red from memory and is light years ahead of that nasty stuff).

Then have one nice glass of something great and spend the rest of the night on the cheap stuff. Takes a little bit of discipline. Once a bottle is opened you have a couple of years before it changes flavour noticeably (assuming you keep it in the dark and standing up) and at some 20 odd drinks to a bottle you'll get through it in a year easy. Even an expensive scotch that is maybe $5 a week. Anyone can save that much.

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Highland scotch is bland nonsense, that's why you are not so keen on it

Any port in a storm...

I had some a couple of years back in the very town. Still peaty but milder than the island malts.

Date of tasting: 8/12 2007

Appearance: Deep Gold or light copper<br>Nose: Relatively closed and prickly. The predominant impression is of some sort of kippery aroma. There are some leafy, spicy and fragrant hints, but they're all very suppressed. The diluted nose opens up a little bit to reveal some green tobacco whiffs along with some aniseed and kiwi fruits.

Body: Medium light

Palate: Much less closed off than the nose, some warming, husky flavours, toasted oak and some sulphuric hints, but not to the point of being unpleasant. It's quite potent and mouth filling. The finish is long and warming.

Kipper flavoured!

Customs duties on grog

$227 duty etc on $400 worth on wine.

I don't know if hard liquor is treated the same but it looks like you add a third. Probably hasn't got the WET tax. Must be some other tax lurking though.

Edit: Man that rich editor sucks. I used to wonder how zaph screwed it up so much. Sorry zaph. Never will I dabble again.

Edited by staringclown

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What is the reaction of most uninitiated people to peaty single-malts?

I'm interested but also scared that if I buy a bottle it will taste like horse's arse because I haven't acquired the taste and then I've wasted a hundred bucks I could have spent on :shocking:

I suppose the sensible thing for me to do is to try a glass in a pub or restaurant somewhere, but XXXX is the good stuff in the places that I frequent!

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What is the reaction of most uninitiated people to peaty single-malts?

I'm interested but also scared that if I buy a bottle it will taste like horse's arse because I haven't acquired the taste and then I've wasted a hundred bucks I could have spent on :shocking:

I suppose the sensible thing for me to do is to try a glass in a pub or restaurant somewhere, but XXXX is the good stuff in the places that I frequent!

gargle a sh*t blended straight, then a good blended (eg Chivas or Dimple), then a workers single malt (glenfiddich etc) then try the peaty.

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What is the reaction of most uninitiated people to peaty single-malts?

I'm interested but also scared that if I buy a bottle it will taste like horse's arse because I haven't acquired the taste and then I've wasted a hundred bucks I could have spent on :shocking:

I suppose the sensible thing for me to do is to try a glass in a pub or restaurant somewhere, but XXXX is the good stuff in the places that I frequent!

In my experience people either love it with a passion, the first sip is like "whoooah holy crap" then 10 minutes later they are asking for a top up. Or they don't like it at all and, I suspect, never will.

Add a drop or two of water to it (less than a teaspoon to 60 ml) and it does smooth out the flavours a lot on the heavier ones (laphroiag, lagavulin, ardbeg) or start with a lighter one (bowmore, caol ila).

I have seen the miniatures for laphraoig at Dan Murphy occasionally, pretty cheap way to try if none of the bars have it.

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Im just about to start on single malts after being on chivas 21yr and johnnie blue for a few years.

Glenlivet 21yr I scored for a good price, so I'm hoping it doesn't dissapoint.......Islay Malts seem to be the next progression.

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In my experience people either love it with a passion, the first sip is like "whoooah holy crap" then 10 minutes later they are asking for a top up.

That was my exact reaction to my first taste of Islay goodness about six years ago. And my second taste, and third, etc. All other whiskies now pale in comparison.

Quite timely to this discussion, I received a 'Friends of Laphroaig' email overnight (thanks to Mrs Ponder's regular Fathers' Day gifts, I'm now steward of a few plots - and plan to head over in 2015 for their bicentennary to collect my 'rent'). Included was news of two new batches:

Triple Wood

At the end of last year we released the second batch of 400 bottles of our new Triple Wood online and in our distillery shop. They sold out within hours so I said I would let you know when the final batch of 1 litre bottles became available. Well it has just arrived! This Triple Wood, (which is in the larger 1 Litre size)is now available online, to our Friends of Laphroaig exclusively. This is an awkward size for us so, as before, when ordering your Triple Wood please do not add anything else to the order. This way we can get it to you promptly. Go to http://www.laphroaig...triple_wood.asp to go directly to Triple Wood in our FOL shop. Remember to log into the FOL site first or you won't see the Triple Wood as it's for Friends only!

Cask Strength – batch 003

If you follow me on Facebook or Twitter you will have seen that I announced last week that we now have batch 3 of our Cask Strength on sale in our online shop. All our batches are bottled at natural distillery strength with all the depth of genuine taste and texture normally associated with sampling whisky at source.

This particular batch was bottled in January 2011 at natural cask strength of 55.3% ABV. Got to http://www.laphroaig...shop_item_id=72 to see this product in our online shop.

Anyone tasted anything fancier than their 10yo?

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Im just about to start on single malts after being on chivas 21yr and johnnie blue for a few years.

Glenlivet 21yr I scored for a good price, so I'm hoping it doesn't dissapoint.......Islay Malts seem to be the next progression.

A generous sibling has kindly given me three bottles of Johnnie Blue over the years - generally as a result of surplus duty free allocation :) The last one came shortly after my discovery of peat, and I struggled with the notion of suggesting that perhaps, next time, they could buy me three Laphroaigs instead - and keep the change.

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Anyone tasted anything fancier than their 10yo?

Have tried the cask strength and, at the time, thought the normal 10 was better. I was stupid enough to drink the lot before buying a comparison bottle of 10yo and comparing flavours though.

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In my experience people either love it with a passion, the first sip is like "whoooah holy crap" then 10 minutes later they are asking for a top up. Or they don't like it at all and, I suspect, never will.

Add a drop or two of water to it (less than a teaspoon to 60 ml) and it does smooth out the flavours a lot on the heavier ones (laphroiag, lagavulin, ardbeg) or start with a lighter one (bowmore, caol ila).

I have seen the miniatures for laphraoig at Dan Murphy occasionally, pretty cheap way to try if none of the bars have it.

I'll give the miniatures a go the next time I go in to buy a case of my usual poison.

One more silly question, do you drink it with or without ice?

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I'll give the miniatures a go the next time I go in to buy a case of my usual poison.

One more silly question, do you drink it with or without ice?

Without ice. Always.

Water is fine ... 'good' in fact, as it can open up the smoky/peaty deliciousness (as Tor mentioned above), but ice - or even iced water - closes them.

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Quite timely to this discussion, I received a 'Friends of Laphroaig' email overnight (thanks to Mrs Ponder's regular Fathers' Day gifts, I'm now steward of a few plots - and plan to head over in 2015 for their bicentennary to collect my 'rent'). Included was news of two new batches:

This is the time to go...

http://www.islaywhiskysociety.com/latest/islaywhisky_festival.html

http://www.scotlandwhisky.com/whisky-festivals/Islay-malt-and-Music-festival/

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