The Claw

How to replace piles of DVD's

23 posts in this topic

I am drowning in DVD's and wonder if there is a better solution. I have:

* store bought movies

* backups and images of PC

* archive of video camera footage

* digital photos

* backups, rips and reformats of store bought movies/series

* MP3 rips of bought CD's

* downloaded material (all public domain of course)

What are the alternatives?

* Bluray writer

* portable hard disks

* the delete key

* the cloud

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I think you're overdoing the backups Claw. Send some to the recycler. I believe that 70% of those discs will never see the light of a red laser.

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whats wrong with putting it all on externals (apart from the bit where you have to put it there)...

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:offtopic:

I always rent my DVD's. Can I just copy them so I can watch them at a better time?

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I am drowning in DVD's and wonder if there is a better solution. I have:

* store bought movies

* backups and images of PC

* archive of video camera footage

* digital photos

* backups, rips and reformats of store bought movies/series

* MP3 rips of bought CD's

* downloaded material (all public domain of course)

What are the alternatives?

* Bluray writer

* portable hard disks

* the delete key

* the cloud

Buy a new pc with eSATA and you can whack 8 or so 2TB drive in there most of them have built in RAID now. Or grab a NAS.

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Buy a new pc with eSATA and you can whack 8 or so 2TB drive in there most of them have built in RAID now. Or grab a NAS.

i think sata's a good brand of hard drive? i prefer pea beu to raid myself. and what would a computer be doing with a national affordability scheme?

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I'm planning to get a NAS with some serious capacity with RAID mirroring. The disks can then go in the cupboard for backups but I'll probably sell the DVDs I wouldn't miss having.

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I store everything in my photographic memory.

i store everything in my pornographic memory.

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I'm planning to get a NAS with some serious capacity with RAID mirroring. The disks can then go in the cupboard for backups but I'll probably sell the DVDs I wouldn't miss having.

won't someone tell me what an NAS and RAID are?

edit - changed the 'a' to 'an' before the NAS. i think it deserves an 'an' because it is an acronym. is that right?

Edited by zaph

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I store everything in my photographic memory.

i store everything in my pornographic memory.

I store everything in my Write Only Memory.

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won't someone tell me what an NAS and RAID are?

edit - changed the 'a' to 'an' before the NAS. i think it deserves an 'an' because it is an acronym. is that right?

:) I thought you were joking before.

NAS: Network attached storage. Kind of a misnomer now as they are generally more powerful computers than existed 10 years ago. They used to be dedicated hardware but are now usually a very small pc with a huge amount of hard drives. Generally speaking they are sort of like a file server without the operating system overhead (not so true anymore) and with specialised hardware for handling large amounts of file serving. Most of them offer other services which are often of a centralised nature too nowadays: torrent server, ftp server, mySQL server etc.

RAID: Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks. A whole bunch of disks (at least 2 commonly 8 for consumer devices) which are configured so that at least one disk can die without you losing your data. Has a bunch of different levels of configuration. RAID 1 (2 disks) or 10 (4 disks+) is usually the quickest an basically just makes a complete copy of each disk to another disk (also called mirroring for that reason). It is also the most wasteful as you need twice as much space as data stored. RAID 5/5.1/6 is the other common level where at least 3 disk are used and instead of a basic copy of the data a checksum is created which allows the data to be recreated in the even of a single disk failing. 6 can usually handle 2 disk failures though and doesn't waste quite as much space.

Basically the NAS is the little box of hard disks and the RAID is the way those disks are configured.

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I dont see why you would want to back up, backup's anyway.

you can get it off the net within a few hours.

It's only the home movies/pics that you really want to keep storage of. and a 2tb drive (less than $100 these days) will do more than enough.

store it at a family members place for a true fire preventative measure.

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I dont see why you would want to back up, backup's anyway.

you can get it off the net within a few hours.

It's only the home movies/pics that you really want to keep storage of. and a 2tb drive (less than $100 these days) will do more than enough.

store it at a family members place for a true fire preventative measure.

It can be a real hassle trying to download stuff rather than having it on hand. Much easier just to buy some disk space.

With uncompressed home videos the AVI files are ~1GB/4mins so they eat up a lot disk space. My home vids are still only on tape for that reason.

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It can be a real hassle trying to download stuff rather than having it on hand. Much easier just to buy some disk space.

With uncompressed home videos the AVI files are ~1GB/4mins so they eat up a lot disk space. My home vids are still only on tape for that reason.

I agree Med, but..

Tapes only last about 2 - 3 years in the tropics, and then mildew hits, unless you can store them in an humidity free room.

Lost heaps of family video's this way, with the old VHS system. The smaller tapes for video camera's do seem to be better, but have now had them all transferred to DVD, and some are stored on hard-drives.

Some people have apparently uploaded their tapes to an internet site, that stores stuff for minimal price.

Thanks tor, for that explanation by the way.

Us old codgers struggle to keep up with all the latest acronyms.

Very helpful.

Edited by Solomon

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It can be a real hassle trying to download stuff rather than having it on hand. Much easier just to buy some disk space.

With uncompressed home videos the AVI files are ~1GB/4mins so they eat up a lot disk space. My home vids are still only on tape for that reason.

I've got an older Camcorder that uses nearly the same.

we don't film much else than the kids or holidays so there isn't much.

the software that came with the camcorder converts it to DVD. Thats good enough storage and compression for me. Also if you want a back up of that, use something like DVD shrink and it will save it in good quality as a proper backup. onto a cheap HDD and off to someone elses house.

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Hello Claw,

I'm going through the same. We've got too much stuff and not enough storage, and the DVDs take up a lot of space considering each disc gets played on average less than once every few years.

My solution was an 8TB NAS ($500 second hand, new would have been $1100) and an Apple TV ($129) hacked to run xbmc ($free).

I'm using Handbrake ($free) to convert my DVDs to decent quality .mkv files with h264 format and constant quality. This uses on average 500mb/hr for encodes that are indistinguishable from the original DVD. The same quality produces larger files from HDTV and obviously larger again from Bluray (but I couldn't be bothered ripping them).

I try to encode a disc a day, then I'm throwing out the cases and packing the DVDs and covers into bags which go into a plastic tub which will be sealed and stored in the shed. Except for the fancy boxed sets and autographed copies. And finally I'll reclaim the cupboards and bookshelves! The process has uncovered lots of memories and nostalgic connections. And I've (ahem) rediscovered the joys of Buffy...

A faster option if your ratio of discs to storage is okay, is to rip the DVDs in full. Instead of reencoding the video you just remove the DRM and wrap the entire TSVIDEO in an mkv file, maintaining the menus and extras. This only works with a selection of media players though.

If I had my time over, I'd probably just buy this and stick a 3TB HDD inside:

http://www.engadget.com/2011/03/08/androids-everywhere-xtreamer-pvr-to-serve-up-a-heaping-helping/

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thanks for the link to handbrake.

i've been looking for somehting like that.

VLC Media player, pretty much plays anything and uses very little resources, comparably.

nothing flash, but it works almost every time.

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VLC Media player, pretty much plays anything and uses very little resources, comparably.

nothing flash, but it works almost every time.

Yep VLC is great if you are watching from a pc.

As a side note I upgraded my PS3 media player (which runs from an old pc reading from a NAS (100Gbps) and streams to 2 PS3's (also 100Gbps wired connection) to the latest beta release and the fast forwarding issue has been fixed. Still have to use the clunky PS3 interface of course.

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Hello Claw,

I'm going through the same. We've got too much stuff and not enough storage, and the DVDs take up a lot of space considering each disc gets played on average less than once every few years.

My solution was an 8TB NAS ($500 second hand, new would have been $1100) and an Apple TV ($129) hacked to run xbmc ($free).

thanks for that post max - i've been thinking about how to get everything on hard drives and streaming. had been thinking about apple tv but am not willing to convert everything to itunes readable format. xbmc using a couple of 1 tb drives attached to my old semi-defunct laptop might be the answer.

have you played with airflick at all? i wonder if that might be a simpler solution than xbmc? might have to go out and buy it this weekend to see how it works. would be awesome to have everything on HDD and dispense with DVDs/CDs.

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I haven't tried airflick. Does it transcode on the fly? I'd rather not.

The real beauty of xbmc is that it goes and fetches all the covers/art/metadata. Here's how mine looks:

A warning though, Apple have updated the version of iOS on the new AppleTVs and last I checked it required a bit more effort (downgrading firmware) to get things going. I'm sure this will get fixed soon. For $129 it's a cheap solution.

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I haven't tried airflick. Does it transcode on the fly? I'd rather not.

The real beauty of xbmc is that it goes and fetches all the covers/art/metadata. Here's how mine looks:

A warning though, Apple have updated the version of iOS on the new AppleTVs and last I checked it required a bit more effort (downgrading firmware) to get things going. I'm sure this will get fixed soon. For $129 it's a cheap solution.

yeah it supposedly transcodes on the fly--i picked up an apple tv today and airflick is a fail. i just need to grab a micro usb cord and, apparently, there is a fix out there now that will allow for xbms installs. looks really nice once it's up and running.

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