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Increasing your Wage

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Thanks for the encouraging words guys.

 

Not counting chickens yet until I have a signed hard copy of the employment contract in my hand. Then there is a 3-month notice period in my current position before I can make the move for a start in February next year.

 

BTW, I can't believe it's only 7 weeks to Christmas!

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Back in 2009 I received a job offer after out of work for about six months. A few days later I was offered a position at about 50% more salary, but the recruitment process dragged out four months due to a hiring freeze.

 

It wasn't really that comfortable but when I explained the seniority of the position and salary (and potential political aspirations as I was working in government at the time) they seemed to take it ok.

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The severance package landed today. Was bigger than expected. I've never seen six figures in my bank account before, a weird feeling. It's like winning the lottery, get paid a sh*tload to leave a job I was thinking of quitting. Think I might start a hedge fund. ;)

 

Too bad my contracting gig fell through due to a hiring freeze. Getting that payment and landing a higher paying job would have made for a very nice fortnight.

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The severance package landed today. Was bigger than expected. I've never seen six figures in my bank account before, a weird feeling. It's like winning the lottery, get paid a sh*tload to leave a job I was thinking of quitting. Think I might start a hedge fund. ;)

 

Too bad my contracting gig fell through due to a hiring freeze. Getting that payment and landing a higher paying job would have made for a very nice fortnight.

Good luck Mr M.

What are you going to do with the windfall? Buy an investment property?

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Good luck Mr M.

What are you going to do with the windfall? Buy an investment property?

Thinking about buying an apartment in Russia. Hard logistically to do as you really need to be on the ground to check out places. I'll buy some audio/video equipment to start video blogging (you could blow six figures on gear, my god it is expensive!) I also have a music project which looks close to materialising (finally).

 

Other than that just boring savings account for now, paying rent and settling the invoices as they roll in. Honestly 100k is not that much living in the West.

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I have a dilemma.

I am currently contracting independently, money is good. But it's only a three month contract and the program may be in trouble so I'm considering other options.

In the last three months I hit four hiring freezes which tells me the market isn't all that hot at the moment. Two were for jobs I probably would have got, and one I eventually did get - only three months later.

So I need to decided whether to commit to looking at more contracting work (more money) or a perm role (more predictability). My preference is probably more for contracting but the market is cool.

If I stick around in my current gig then money is unlikely to be higher elsewhere... but it could come to a grinding halt and I'm burning savings looking for a gig.

So do I jump early or take my chances and stick around? Or do something else? What would you do?

 

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On 3/2/2017 at 11:38 PM, Mr Medved said:

I have a dilemma.

I am currently contracting independently, money is good. But it's only a three month contract and the program may be in trouble so I'm considering other options.

In the last three months I hit four hiring freezes which tells me the market isn't all that hot at the moment. Two were for jobs I probably would have got, and one I eventually did get - only three months later.

So I need to decided whether to commit to looking at more contracting work (more money) or a perm role (more predictability). My preference is probably more for contracting but the market is cool.

If I stick around in my current gig then money is unlikely to be higher elsewhere... but it could come to a grinding halt and I'm burning savings looking for a gig.

So do I jump early or take my chances and stick around? Or do something else? What would you do?

 

I've found early in my career that there really is no more job security as a permanent vs contracting. I got 'chewed up & spat out' during my second job out of Uni and made me decide to go contracting as soon as I had the skills to do so. I've now been contracting for about 30 years and probably wasted < 6 months looking for a contract. I've seen under performing permanent employees terminated whilst I've been retained. It boils down to your marketable skills and competence.

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I am definitely leaning towards contracting, just there aren't that many opportunities at the moment and the market seems to be cool. That's why I'm thinking about perm roles.

Edited by Mr Medved

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First bit of contracting is the hardest. After that you have a network and things are easier. I doubt the market will make much of a difference to that really.

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2 hours ago, Mr Medved said:

I am definitely leaning towards contracting, just there aren't that many opportunities at the moment and the market seems to be cool. That's why I'm thinking about perm roles.

Biggest problem now is that large companies only hire through agencies, who are often useless. In the good ol' days, I had a list of places with the technology I knew and cold called them directly.

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OR you could look at retraining in areas which are currently (or futurely) in demand. I'm personally keen on a masters in data science. I'm working on somebody else paying for it from a permanent position. A masters from ANU with them footing the bill. If push come to shove I'll pay for it myself. IT security and data science are the vogue areas ATM

 

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Data Science looks like being the same as network admin in the late 90's :)

 

Lot's of enthusiastic people with enough skills to really make a mess of it. The number of people that ask me about designs they have come up with that are just startlingly sh*t is incredible.

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14 hours ago, staringclown said:

OR you could look at retraining in areas which are currently (or futurely) in demand. I'm personally keen on a masters in data science. I'm working on somebody else paying for it from a permanent position. A masters from ANU with them footing the bill. If push come to shove I'll pay for it myself. IT security and data science are the vogue areas ATM

 

IT security is certainly a money spinner. Where I'm contracting now, they hire a company to do penetration testing every time a system is changed. They send somebody who connects to the system and runs a special software on his notebook to do the penetration testing. A couple of hours later, the software spits out stats which are then copied & pasted into a formal 'recommendation' report. For that, they charge $$$$.

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10 hours ago, Mr Medved said:

Does it do much more than a port scan?

Have no idea as I didn't talk to him.

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On 5 March 2017 at 8:50 AM, tor said:

Data Science looks like being the same as network admin in the late 90's :)

 

Lot's of enthusiastic people with enough skills to really make a mess of it. The number of people that ask me about designs they have come up with that are just startlingly sh*t is incredible.

There is a bit of that. :) 

I'm not seeing anyone first hand doing any data science really well. I've been to a couple of conferences of late though and there are a few examples of useful analytic systems. Telstra use real time streaming of log data from a various sources and have intrusion detection alerts based on machine learning 'patterns'. Anything out of pattern raises an alert. Apparently they busted a bunch of their developers going around the proxy server direct to the web.

I think it's probably useful for marketing companies targeting advertising. I think it was Walmart that pitched some baby product at some girl in the states. Her dad saw the pitch and went down to Walmart to complain. The girl was pregnant and Walmart knew before the family based on search activity. 

The Centrelink robodebt debacle illustrates the limitations of the data matching side. Especially when false positives cause people a lot of angst. They don't have much fuzzy logic ability so if clients don't enter their employers business name identically on both ATO and Centrelink systems they get pinged for overpayments.

Risk based systems like operational decision making can benefit I suspect. 

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On 6 March 2017 at 7:51 AM, cobran20 said:

Have no idea as I didn't talk to him.

I'd be surprised if it's a simple port scan. There's online sites that'll do that for you at no cost using nmap.

More likely they scan ports and send requests to discover software versions then see if the version has any exploits. Metasploit has good tool for this.

They should if they are worth their salt be checking the owasp top ten web vulnerabilities as well. Though these are likely integrated into pen testing tools.
 

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My father was notified of redundancy today. You guessed it - replaced by outsourced Indian IT company! Not sure how many people are impacted in his company but sounds like their IT division is closing down. Doesn't sound like he'll be back doing consulting/contracting for them as that particular vendor is highly protective of their turf.

Given he is in his 60s he would have preferred to work another year or two, as it's hard to find work at that age and he's used to working from home... he has done so for at least 20 years I think. So early retirement it is for him. Apparently he pays bugger all tax on the redundancy payment so it's not all bad news.

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