tor

Increasing your Wage

195 posts in this topic

Linkedin mails are interested in my mad skillz. This is vaguely encouraging in a time of austerity in government... Might be time to enjoy a hiatus from the APS. Or use it as leverage. :sly:  Same job, same duties but double the wage. I've asked for 180K  :lol: Cheap at half the price. My fear is they will accept. 75% of the time will be on client sites away from Canberry unfortunately which won't please Ms Clown.

 

Best of luck with the "offer you can't refuse"!

 

LinkedIn seems to work for you? I never get approached with offers.

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Best of luck with the "offer you can't refuse"!

 

LinkedIn seems to work for you? I never get approached with offers.

 

Not even recruiters wanting to be your friend? I've had a few this year but don't add them unless I know them.

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Best of luck with the "offer you can't refuse"!

 

LinkedIn seems to work for you? I never get approached with offers.

 

Thanks Anders. 

 

I've had about three offers in the last twelve months through LinkedIn. As Mr Medved says I have a bunch of recruiter friends. 

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Not even recruiters wanting to be your friend? I've had a few this year but don't add them unless I know them.

 

No, not even recruiters. I think I have had too many career changes - leading to a Jack of no trades skill set.

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No, not even recruiters. I think I have had too many career changes - leading to a Jack of no trades skill set.

 

Some (un)helpful tips - know the key words recruiters look for and add them to your profile (looking at job ads can help); if you performed multiple roles under the one title add them in the description (a form of key words); write some some articles if you're confident in your writing skills and you have something to say. For the latter you could post them here first to get feedback...

 

It's hard if you are in a specialised field - easy to be pigeon holed. I'm trying to transition into management and it's hard as I don't have any formal people management roles but have led teams for a number of years (informally).

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Some (un)helpful tips - know the key words recruiters look for and add them to your profile (looking at job ads can help); if you performed multiple roles under the one title add them in the description (a form of key words); write some some articles if you're confident in your writing skills and you have something to say. For the latter you could post them here first to get feedback...

 

It's hard if you are in a specialised field - easy to be pigeon holed. I'm trying to transition into management and it's hard as I don't have any formal people management roles but have led teams for a number of years (informally).

 

Thanks for the tips, Mr Medved.

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That sounds awful. If you did that recruiters would be mailing you even more!

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That sounds awful. If you did that recruiters would be mailing you even more!

 

The last time I used a recruiter/agent was in 1994. All my jobs and contracts since then have been through contacts, except the latest job here in Sweden. The longest break between jobs has been the one month after our move here.

 

It is just a bit of a mystery that no recruiter wants to touch me when I have had no trouble finding jobs myself so far. Perhaps I have a really crap CV. You can check it out since we are connected on LinkedIn. Tips are greatly appreciated - be brutal with the feedback!

 

Perhaps recruiters generally want to put competitive bids to their clients with experienced young-ish candidates that have clearly defined expertise. Otherwise they lose the clients to some other recruiter. Makes a 50+ year-old "never-was" not so attractive to put forward.

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I wouldn't crop the photo :)

 

To be honest looks like a solid profile to me so I am guessing it is your last guess with the "experienced youngish" thing happening.

 

Also If I were looking at your profile I would be surprised if you were interested in job offers from outside your network as that level of experience would indicate to me someone with a decent network. As a recruiter I might not waste my time or yours unless I had an actual network connection to you.

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I wouldn't crop the photo :)

 

To be honest looks like a solid profile to me so I am guessing it is your last guess with the "experienced youngish" thing happening.

 

Also If I were looking at your profile I would be surprised if you were interested in job offers from outside your network as that level of experience would indicate to me someone with a decent network. As a recruiter I might not waste my time or yours unless I had an actual network connection to you.

 

Thanks, tor! (it wasn't brutal, though)

 

OK, I should probably replace my vacation photo with a boring suited up portrait with studio lighting. I just haven't been arsed to get one done.

 

Very interesting point about me looking uninterested in offers outside my network… hmmm...

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Well hard to be brutal about it really. Just a series of facts. I guess you could go the whole "engage the audience and create a narrative"  I am sure a resume consultant would suggest something like that. I get a few of them sent my way so I figure it might be a "thing" now.

 

But I would never hire you if you had that kind of dross, I figure it is the kind of story I only want to hear over beers.

 

For the photo I don't think I have even bothered with one. I don't see linkedin as worth the investment really and just do drunken rant style updates every year or two.

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I've heard that Australians don't view kindly to "international experience". I know that sounds dumb (and is) but may be something you're facing if you're down under.

 

The other thing (without seeing your profile) is if you're coming across as over-qualified. That's less dumb but could scare people off depending on the roles you are looking for.

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Nah Anders is Euro cool now. He's doing the Swedish pop star style. Hot blondes, tons of booze etc...

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Thanks, tor! (it wasn't brutal, though)

 

OK, I should probably replace my vacation photo with a boring suited up portrait with studio lighting. I just haven't been arsed to get one done.

 

Very interesting point about me looking uninterested in offers outside my network… hmmm...

 

Funky CV makes applicant stand out as tiresome little sh*t
26-01-15

cv4251.jpg
 
HAVING an innovative multimedia CV makes you stand out from the pack as a particularly tedious person, according to employers.

IT company boss Mary Fisher said: “Most CVs just arrive typed out an a sheet of A4 with the section headings in bold.

 

“But in today’s highly competitive jobs markets some individuals go the extra mile, for example by making a mock newspaper about themselves or including a CD of them rapping about their project management experience.

 

“Imagine being shut in an office with someone like that for months, even years, on end. You would murder them.”

 

Recruitment consultant Roy Hobbs said: “People who do funky CVs are overly keen little bastards with no integrity, which is exactly what we’re looking for to fill an array of marketing and sales positions.

 

“It also helps if they have mean, piggy little eyes.

 

 

The recruitment dude hasn't got back to me about the job @ 180k. So I guess that's a no...

:)

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I've heard that Australians don't view kindly to "international experience". I know that sounds dumb (and is) but may be something you're facing if you're down under.

 

The other thing (without seeing your profile) is if you're coming across as over-qualified. That's less dumb but could scare people off depending on the roles you are looking for.

 

I can verify this as far as the building industry goes. I have a friend that was managing building sites in Ireland. He arrived back in Melbourne and his experience was summarily dismissed as not being relevant to the Australian industry. The reasons stated were that contacts were more important locally than experience in quantity surveying. The "mates rates" paradigm was in operation. As was the ability to manage the unions which may not have applied in other countries. I don't know that it's widespread. Given the number of foreign IT workers I work with it doesn't apply to my industry...

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Have recently accepted a new job (with a 30% pay rise). Trying to find the right words (and state of mind) for my current employer, which doesn't end with me marching off with two fingers raised high. I figure it is probably not good to burn bridges so vigorously in such a small town. I struggle with not being honest if asked for my view. I just need to find a way to be honest in a polite way...which could be a topic for a new thread.

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"More money, what would you do?"

 

To be honest I have never really felt the desire to do the whole burning bridges thing. Not out of any sense of sanity, just because it is just work, why put energy into something I am leaving?

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Well I don't wish to burn bridges either, but I also don't want to get into a situation in which I am tempted to describe all the reasons why I am leaving. It does not help me and it won't change them. I could squib and say 'for personal reasons' but that is not quite true either.

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Well I don't wish to burn bridges either, but I also don't want to get into a situation in which I am tempted to describe all the reasons why I am leaving. It does not help me and it won't change them. I could squib and say 'for personal reasons' but that is not quite true either.

 

 

I wouldn't burn the bridges. I've burnt far too many in my time and strangely you sometimes end up needing a job. If your industry is small the sweet taste of revenge can be tempered by the bitter taste of humble pie later down the track.

 

If you have scored a pay rise then consider the phrases:

 

  • I have been offered a rewarding role in blah...
  • The new role aligns more with my long term goals of blah
  • I feel I'm growing stale in my current role and would benefit from broadening my profile in blah
  • I am thinking of the offer as a sabbatical (this is really pushing the I'll be back don't worry barrel)

 

You can start a new thread if you like but I think this thread can cope with the traffic.  :)

 

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Congrats on the new job, Ugg!

 

Seems like you are itching to tell the old employer a few hard truths.  :)

 

Just make a list of the positive motivators for changing jobs. If they ask, just tell them a few of them. Keep a few positive reasons up your sleeve if they keep pressing you for an explanation.

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The recruitment dude hasn't got back to me about the job @ 180k. So I guess that's a no...

:)

 

How did you go, SC? Has the recruiter contact you yet?

 

It seems recruiters have a bit of a reputation, where the paying client (employer) is everything and the candidates can be treated any which way.

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At Telecom NZ they made me do management training (a good use of resources that was) and one bit of that was how to do exit interviews. I said they were pointless and I think this topic shows why. Their data indicated no one ever left for money. I laughed my arse off.

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At Telecom NZ they made me do management training (a good use of resources that was) and one bit of that was how to do exit interviews. I said they were pointless and I think this topic shows why. Their data indicated no one ever left for money. I laughed my arse off.

 

Exit interviews… don't get me started.

 

I used to work for a veeery dysfunctional company. The majority of the top layers of management did a mutiny and opened up a competing company.

 

I never noticed that HR ever acted on "constructive feedback" from exit interviews - the very rare occasions that some brave soul actually offered such advice.

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How did you go, SC? Has the recruiter contact you yet?

 

It seems recruiters have a bit of a reputation, where the paying client (employer) is everything and the candidates can be treated any which way.

Well Anders, I thought it was all dead in the water as the dude promised to be in touch by the friday after I posted the initial post. Then he rang me last friday and said he'd only just put my offer in. So I still don't know. I suppose it's encouraging that HP haven't set the dogs on me yet...  ^_^

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If you have scored a pay rise then consider the phrases:

 

  • I have been offered a rewarding role in blah...
  • The new role aligns more with my long term goals of blah
  • I feel I'm growing stale in my current role and would benefit from broadening my profile in blah
  • I am thinking of the offer as a sabbatical (this is really pushing the I'll be back don't worry barrel)

 

yes that is the way I will need to do it.

  • i need to fufill my desire to be a meglomaniac
  • I'm ..like...a rolling stone maaan

Just don't like the farce, especially when both sides know it's a farce.

Edited by Ugg

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