tor

Kitchens are food related right?

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Am getting a new kitchen. Involves demolishing a few walls and such.

Does anyone have cool arse kitchen ideas?

Ideally things they know work from experience. If anyone mentions the jamie oliver "bin in the chopping board" I will kill them as they obviously never had one, I made one and it is probably the worst idea that looked good on paper ever.

Currently looking at about 15m of stone top with all the walls removed to make it a big arse kitchen. Effectively from the pole in the left of frame all the way round to slightly behind the camera in the attached shot. The mid and back walls are going away down to level with the bottom of the mid frame window. Intend to replace the gas cook top with some fancy stuff because I can.

So the kitchen will kind of turn into a little self contained area from the current stovetop back all the way round but will no longer have the walls so I can chat to people over the other side of the wall.

I have started plans for a massive long term storage pantry so don't worry about the pantry being gone.

I have a half arsed idea of hanging my fry pans from the post closest the cook top and a magnetic knife rack is already on the wall between the two windows. Fridge is out of shot at the back right and will stay there.

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What an awesome space you have there Tor! Just WOW!

For me, kitchens have to be symmetrical and minimal in design, can't stand wall ovens positioned to one side with nothing the other side balancing it out (might mean buying 2 ovens, side by side smack bang in the middle of kitchen) Even doors have to be balanced if possible. It's just a personal preference, easier on the eye. Can't stand knick knacks on display, has to be streamlined, sleek and sexy.

I'm a fan of IKEA kitchens for bases, not benchtops, same shell as any of the top quality ones, all made of chipboard. Seen IKEA kitchens used in a few Grand Design episodes recently looking very stylish with fancy splashbacks and stone/granite benchtops.

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What an awesome space you have there Tor! Just WOW!

For me, kitchens have to be symmetrical and minimal in design, can't stand wall ovens positioned to one side with nothing the other side balancing it out (might mean buying 2 ovens, side by side smack bang in the middle of kitchen) Even doors have to be balanced if possible. It's just a personal preference, easier on the eye. Can't stand knick knacks on display, has to be streamlined, sleek and sexy.

I'm a fan of IKEA kitchens for bases, not benchtops, same shell as any of the top quality ones, all made of chipboard. Seen IKEA kitchens used in a few Grand Design episodes recently looking very stylish with fancy splashbacks and stone/granite benchtops.

Yeah it is an excellent area for a kitchen. It is pretty much why I bought place (alongside the whole "you can only see trees" thing). To be honest I don't really get why someone that claimed to have kitchen as their focus would have tolerated the crappy door hinges and all for 10 years. Also 2 of the gas burners had obviously not been used ever. It took until a few months back to get them to light and stay lit in roughly the same time as the two other burners. The fish fryer in the middle (or as I think of it, the gravy making flame) still doesn't work properly.

I have waited 2 years prepaying the mortgage so we are now some 20 years ahead on it and now have cash free to do it the way I like. I have told the designer guy that it has to be functional for me and pretty for the girlfriend (after all she cleans it).

I took him to see a network port which has recently been put in which is a cm out of whack with the power socket above it and explained how much that sh*ts me. He seems to have understood.

I am looking at spending way way too much on this for resale value, it was actually one of the first things he asked. I said "no do it f*cking properly or I will hunt you down and kill you". Admittedly I was kind of drunk at the time.

We are going through final designs this week and I am hoping I haven't missed anything for a domestic kitchen (sorry ruffian).

The builder that is going to take down the walls almost wet himself when I explained where the beer lines have to go :)

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There is no way I could not comment on this thread...

What works for someone else probably won't work for you, on principle. (It's a kind of natural law, I think)

However you have a head start on, well, everyone, having a space like that to begin with.

Off the top of my head, and assuming you are prepared to spend up big -

Build everything around the holy trinity of sink, fridge and cooktop. Minimise commuting distances between them.

Check bench height. Make sure it is right for you - an inch either way makes a huge difference.

Check bench depth - if you have the option, make it an inch or two deeper, but not so deep that you (or whoever does the cleaning) can't get to the splashback.

Light everything up to nuclear level, and then put a dimmer on a couple of crucially located mood lights, so you can have the best of both worlds. Don't forget under-cabinet lighting for your work area, and also feature lighting as it is in an open space. Yes, that adds up to four different lighting systems but it will be worth it, I promise.

Include more counterspace than you think you need. Then add a bit more. If you are a minimalist all that flat smooth surface will thrill you every time you see it, if you are not then, Yay! there is more space to put stuff.

A HUGE exhaust fan over the cooktop. A big open plan space like that doesn't want to remind you of last night's dinner, or worse, the night before last's...

No pots hanging anywhere. All that exposed crap looks good but is a pain to clean as they collect greasy kitchen dust, no matter how careful you are.

No glass doors on anything except a few carefully located brag cupboards. That way no-one needs to see your less than perfect mixing bowls or heritage listed hand mixer, but glassware or artist's one-ofs are nicely on show.

Lots of bin space, convenient to your work area.

Slightly more contentious ideas -

Minimise white. Some people swear by it, as it's easy to clean. Others swear at it, because it is not. You don't have kids and I think you said your GF likes to clean so maybe you could get away with it. I couldn't.

No stone countertops - or stone floors, either - but you seem to have fumbled that one already. ;-) This is because nothing survives the falls. I personally like stainless steel countertops - smooth, cool and easy to care for, and the breakages are far fewer, and timber floors. (BTW cork looks ugly but is great to walk on, and I once saw someone actually bounce a glass plate on one - very few breakages there)

Watch the quality of stainless steel appliances as some mark horribly and some mark permanently (I currently have a SS dishwasher with a large permanent drip mark on it and it drives me bonkers). Quality, quality, quality - or consider -gasp!- going back to enamel finishes, which are easy to clean.

No more bloody straight lines and sharp edges and pointy bits. It's fashionable perhaps, but hard to clean and uncomfortable to move around. Also I think the angular trend is on it's absolute last legs and something softer and more organic is coming in. And, I don't think it would suit the rest of your place particularly well.

Dish drawers - instead of cupboards - are of limited use. Soft closures and internal liners slow, but don't stop, movement when they close and I found that some platters and dishes developed wear patterns on their flat surfaces due to minute movement every time the drawers were opened. They also hold less than a well planned cupboard. So, OK for cups, cutlery and some pots and pans but not for anything else you value!

And never, ever buy Kleenmaid anything, ever. Every single appliance of that brand I have ever used has been a dog.

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I have told the designer guy that it has to be functional for me and pretty for the girlfriend (after all she cleans it).

hmm sounds like you are not going for stainless then, though you could mention it is a lot easier to clean than stone.

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We just cook in the kitchen, we don't think too hard about it, most of the stuff we cook takes < 30 minutes to make anyway. Our new house is a 'just good enough' for a few years anyway, after that we'll be fishing for somewhere bigger so the soon-to-be-teenager has somewhere to escape properly from the very little people (my largest age gap between kids is almost 10 years). A cool kitchen isn't actually on our list. We just left the standard design much as it was because the layout seemed fine, picked bench colour, splashback tiles, vinyl wrap cupboards (cos they are cool and don't have seams) and whacked in some overheads. My furniture in that room is all cherry red and the rest of the room is boring beige so we went a black granite look countertop.

But as to stone ... I have to admit I like plain ol laminex, it comes in a basquillion colours. But if you do go stone, go REAL stone, the various manufactured stones I've heard so many bad stories about I'm scatching to think of anything positive to say about them. Everyone raves about the stuff before they own it and after they own it it is just one complaint after another.

The MIL wants a kitchen with those pot drawers and a higher bench top, she's tall. She goes on about all the cool things she wants in a kitchen quite frequently when we visit them. In the time she's been talking about it, we've bought TWO kitchens. So good to hear you're one of those people that does things, not just talks about them :) Not that we didn't know that already lol

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There is no way I could not comment on this thread...

Hook line and sinker! hehehe.

What works for someone else probably won't work for you, on principle. (It's a kind of natural law, I think)

Yep there are compromises for the girlfriend already. I would have probably gone all stainless stuff on wheels so it can be rolled out and water blasted once a year easily. This required detachable water, gas and power which I started researching and designing bits that don't exist already. Unfortunately this is apparently not allowed in domestic kitchens and so has been ruled out.

Build everything around the holy trinity of sink, fridge and cooktop. Minimise commuting distances between them.

cooktop, bin and sink check, fridge not so much as it means having a tall thing in the middle which I don't want. So the fridge will stay where it is currently. Am used to it now and think the openess will be cooler than saving a few steps.

Check bench height. Make sure it is right for you - an inch either way makes a huge difference.

Check bench depth - if you have the option, make it an inch or two deeper, but not so deep that you (or whoever does the cleaning) can't get to the splashback.

Light everything up to nuclear level, and then put a dimmer on a couple of crucially located mood lights, so you can have the best of both worlds. Don't forget under-cabinet lighting for your work area, and also feature lighting as it is in an open space. Yes, that adds up to four different lighting systems but it will be worth it, I promise.

Include more counterspace than you think you need. Then add a bit more. If you are a minimalist all that flat smooth surface will thrill you every time you see it, if you are not then, Yay! there is more space to put stuff.

A HUGE exhaust fan over the cooktop. A big open plan space like that doesn't want to remind you of last night's dinner, or worse, the night before last's...

Bench height and depth done, lighting done (there are no cabinets above the bench so not an issue). Bench space ought to be about 15m which should be absolute over kill. It means I can have all my useful stuff ready to go, rather than having to haul stuff out if I want use them.

The current exhaust does the trick at the moment and I have the big industrial ventilators up top which means I don't have to rush into this just yet but I suspect I might need a better one in future as I want to raise the hood higher which might make it not work so good.

Someone has a bit of a passion for lamps so with the lighting we will probably end up with more than 4 lighting sets :)

No pots hanging anywhere. All that exposed crap looks good but is a pain to clean as they collect greasy kitchen dust, no matter how careful you are.

No glass doors on anything except a few carefully located brag cupboards. That way no-one needs to see your less than perfect mixing bowls or heritage listed hand mixer, but glassware or artist's one-ofs are nicely on show.

Lots of bin space, convenient to your work area.

Bins sorted, I was thinking of having some of my cooler pots and one off things hanging but that has been given a decidedly lukewarm reception, you are probably right :) I don't believe we are having any glass doors at all.

Minimise white. Some people swear by it, as it's easy to clean. Others swear at it, because it is not. You don't have kids and I think you said your GF likes to clean so maybe you could get away with it. I couldn't.

No stone countertops - or stone floors, either - but you seem to have fumbled that one already. ;-) This is because nothing survives the falls. I personally like stainless steel countertops - smooth, cool and easy to care for, and the breakages are far fewer, and timber floors. (BTW cork looks ugly but is great to walk on, and I once saw someone actually bounce a glass plate on one - very few breakages there)

We are having all white doors and black stone bench tops. This has been decided ;) All of the woodwork I have ensured is curved cuts so you don't get the impossible to clean internal corners. I'd have gone brushed steel tops too. Replacing the stone floor is not really something I want to include and I am assured that the black floor and benchtop will look good with sh*t in between. We already have an awful lot of wood and more has been specifically stated as not required. The only breakages we ever get are when she slips doing the dishes, for some reason despite my usual drunkeness I never drop stuff. Even when I burn the crap out of my hand in the process :)

Watch the quality of stainless steel appliances as some mark horribly and some mark permanently (I currently have a SS dishwasher with a large permanent drip mark on it and it drives me bonkers). Quality, quality, quality - or consider -gasp!- going back to enamel finishes, which are easy to clean.

No more bloody straight lines and sharp edges and pointy bits. It's fashionable perhaps, but hard to clean and uncomfortable to move around. Also I think the angular trend is on it's absolute last legs and something softer and more organic is coming in. And, I don't think it would suit the rest of your place particularly well.

Dish drawers - instead of cupboards - are of limited use. Soft closures and internal liners slow, but don't stop, movement when they close and I found that some platters and dishes developed wear patterns on their flat surfaces due to minute movement every time the drawers were opened. They also hold less than a well planned cupboard. So, OK for cups, cutlery and some pots and pans but not for anything else you value!

I am doing the pencil cut on the stone (think of the eraser end of the pencil, not the pointy end) I also get sh*tty when I connect with pointy bits as I have mostly soft bits.

Yeah drawers are for utensils and cutlery. there will be some massive ones which I might use for a pantry type thing but I am somewhat dubious about that. Designer guy has got these lazy susan type deals for the corner cupboards which sound interesting as I hate corner cupboards as you get stuff in the back which you just can't get.

And never, ever buy Kleenmaid anything, ever. Every single appliance of that brand I have ever used has been a dog.

Agreed. Thanks for the ideas. I am petrified I have forgotten something and will only realise when it is too late.

Oh I am getting ducting put in everywhere as well so I can run cables as and when required for speakers, computers etc too.

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We just cook in the kitchen, we don't think too hard about it, most of the stuff we cook takes < 30 minutes to make anyway.

You've seen my recipes :)

But as to stone ... I have to admit I like plain ol laminex, it comes in a basquillion colours. But if you do go stone, go REAL stone, the various manufactured stones I've heard so many bad stories about I'm scatching to think of anything positive to say about them. Everyone raves about the stuff before they own it and after they own it it is just one complaint after another.

In the apartments I have lived in about the best of the stone tops I found was the synthetic ones in mottled black. They can be repaired which is a massive bonus idea. I am getting it thicker than the default though just in case. I'd prefer stainless but understand that my aesthetics can be considered a non functional part of my brain. I really hate the laminates though too many places have had burns in them.

What problems have you heard with artificial stone? I will check the manufacturer.

So good to hear you're one of those people that does things, not just talks about them :) Not that we didn't know that already lol

It can take me a couple years of thinking before I do anything :)

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I don't know if there are children in your future, but if so I'd suggest having a single entry point that can possibly be gated off with a baby gate. We have a single door to our kitchen with the baby gate in it and honestly I don't know how people with children have big open plan kitchens without going insane.

Don't discount the value of a nice big or even walk in pantry right on location.

You might not care about resale value, but resaleability can become an issue when people come up with their perfect idiosynchratic kitchen. A potential buyer could say "what the hell did they do that for?" and look at a more conventional place.

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Sage advice from Ruffian. Can't argue with any of it really. I was going to say that I like the idea of having things hanging on hooks for ease of access but the grease would stick to them and it's probably a bad idea overall. Having worked in a few commercial kitchens I would say the main concern was having plenty of bench space and not so much floor space. The ability to turn and get stuff without having to walk very far is the key to efficiency. I would want a couple of "stations". Ms clown and myself often work together in the kitchen and get in each others way a bit. You have a nice starting point there tor. I'm envious. I would go for stainless steel tops with full SS splash backs.

Check out these for some kitchens. Actually some look like cleaning nightmares but are pretty swanky.

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Edited by staringclown

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Sage advice from Ruffian. Can't argue with any of it really. I was going to say that I like the idea of having things hanging on hooks for ease of access but the grease would stick to them and it's probably a bad idea overall. Having worked in a few commercial kitchens I would say the main concern was having plenty of bench space and not so much floor space. The ability to turn and get stuff without having to walk very far is the key to efficiency. I would want a couple of "stations". Ms clown and myself often work together in the kitchen and get in each others way a bit. You have a nice starting point there tor. I'm envious. I would go for stainless steel tops with full SS splash backs.

Check out these for some kitchens. Actually some look like cleaning nightmares but are pretty swanky.

post-106-020393600 1288486602_thumb.jpg

post-106-099974700 1288486645_thumb.jpg

post-106-057584900 1288486657_thumb.jpg

post-106-031047800 1288486666_thumb.jpg

post-106-072071500 1288486677_thumb.jpg

Hmmm. Buggered up the image sizing.

take 2

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post-106-071491300 1288486888_thumb.jpg

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I don't know if there are children in your future...

Not in my future. It would be relatively simple to implement if required though. Entry is a choke point deliberately, I hate when people come into the kitchen when I am cooking. Especially when they want to help. There will be ample seating for people that want to talk to me while I am in there but they will be safely walled off :)

Don't discount the value of a nice big or even walk in pantry right on location.

hehehe I am building a 6m x 3m pantry in a weird bit of crawl space. It is only about 4 ft high but it is unused currently and it is beside where I am cutting through to downstairs for a stair case. I figure may as well put in a landing which has a door into long term storage area there for tupperware and tins and such. I also have a large "immediate" use pantry already in the plan but that will depend on whether I need it or not and will go in after I have used the kitchen a bit.

You might not care about resale value, but resaleability can become an issue when people come up with their perfect idiosynchratic kitchen. A potential buyer could say "what the hell did they do that for?" and look at a more conventional place.

Oh I am screwed for that already :) this whole house is insanely idiosyncratic. Selling it is not likely to ever be a realistic option. That said I think the final design looks quite normal.

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Hook line and sinker! hehehe.

Man, you clearly have it covered - you didn't need our advice... you just wanted to torment the less kitchenly endowed!

The only breakages we ever get are when she slips doing the dishes, for some reason despite my usual drunkeness I never drop stuff. Even when I burn the crap out of my hand in the process :)

I bet you are like the dude I saw at a party once. He was pushed squarely backwards into/onto a large glass coffee table, shoulder rolled and landed on his feet on the other side, coffee table unmarked and he didn't lose even a drop of his beer in the process. God smiles on drunks and small children...

Oh I am getting ducting put in everywhere as well so I can run cables as and when required for speakers, computers etc too.

Excellent idea. Cables are a phenomenal pain in the arse.

We have just ducted the cables leading to a large coffee table in the centre of our living area, which has become some sort of impromptu domestic technology hub - four laptops on it virtually 24/7, plus misc other crap. Well worth the trauma, as it can now be politely concealed from casual observers (It's a big coffee table,with some storage capacity) and injuries/damages from cable-related trippage have abruptly dropped to nil.

The other nifty idea I saw recently is to have a purpose-built recharge area in a very central cupboard in the kitchen, for phones and cameras and whatever.

Hoolaman - we had our kids crawling/toddling in open-plan kitchens and had no problems. We didn't use much in the way of baby-proofing, either, as it seemed to involve too many hassles for the parents. Our oldest understood the 'no' concept very well from an early age, and even better liked to enforce it on his little sister a little later on. If anything, an open-plan kitchen means that you can keep a good close eye on the little buggers...

RE - yes, I've heard bad reports about artificial stone, too. Scratches and stains mostly. It wouldn't be high on my list. Off on another track, I have a friend with an 18 month old corian countertop and that seems to be going OK, but I don't know how much use it actually gets.

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Man, you clearly have it covered - you didn't need our advice... you just wanted to torment the less kitchenly endowed!

It may seem that way but I do actually want to ensure I have covered everything. Too much cash to spend and find you have missed a basic thing. I spent most of the afternoon measuring heights and such and firing them off tot he guy to ensure I am covered on your bench recommendations.

I bet you are like the dude I saw at a party once. He was pushed squarely backwards into/onto a large glass coffee table, shoulder rolled and landed on his feet on the other side, coffee table unmarked and he didn't lose even a drop of his beer in the process. God smiles on drunks and small children...

I once got hit by a car where I was running between the campus at Sydney uni in the rain and the cars had stopped. Unfortunately the inside lane which normally has parker cars didn't and a car was coming up. I had well worn skate shoes and it was raining so no traction at all. I was wearing my "old man flasher" grey wool raincoat and managed to jump and slide across his bonnet and land almost like a stunt guy.

Mentally a child and certainly a drunk :)

Excellent idea. Cables are a phenomenal pain in the arse.

We have just ducted the cables leading to a large coffee table in the centre of our living area, which has become some sort of impromptu domestic technology hub - four laptops on it virtually 24/7, plus misc other crap. Well worth the trauma, as it can now be politely concealed from casual observers (It's a big coffee table,with some storage capacity) and injuries/damages from cable-related trippage have abruptly dropped to nil.

The other nifty idea I saw recently is to have a purpose-built recharge area in a very central cupboard in the kitchen, for phones and cameras and whatever.

I am thinking about this, the new wireless power chargers mats seem pretty cool. Too soon to tell really but I am thinking of making a door ide table with charger mats once the tech goes wide spread. In the mean time I use wireless where I can (sucks for HD playback) and only buy usb rechargeable mobile devices, that way any notebook can recharge them. Ubiquitous wireless net and power is going to be so awesome.

RE - yes, I've heard bad reports about artificial stone, too. Scratches and stains mostly. It wouldn't be high on my list. Off on another track, I have a friend with an 18 month old corian countertop and that seems to be going OK, but I don't know how much use it actually gets.

I have mistreated the crap out of artificial stone in my renting days with nary a problem. Am starting to wonder if it is the quality or if people just mistreat way more than I do. No point in a chunk of stone if it craps out in a few days.

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i used to think net in the kitchen was wank. but i find myself taking the laptop into the kitchen and looking up recipes more and more. the soy sauce on the keyboard is becoming a problem.

i'd want a touch screen net enabled device of some sort, preferably disguised as a cupboard so people didn't think i was a wanker. either that or a massive wide screen thing i could see the recipe from anywhere in the kitchen.

tor, i only skimmed responses, but am i right in saying you are going to have stairs down to the cellar (don't tell the rea it's a pantry, and certainly don't tell them it's a vault)? it would be really cool if you conceal this somehow, so when the door to the 'cellar' is closed you wouldn't know there is anything else there.

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i used to think net in the kitchen was wank. but i find myself taking the laptop into the kitchen and looking up recipes more and more. the soy sauce on the keyboard is becoming a problem.

i'd want a touch screen net enabled device of some sort, preferably disguised as a cupboard so people didn't think i was a wanker. either that or a massive wide screen thing i could see the recipe from anywhere in the kitchen.

Yep the girlfriend watches her stories while doing the cleaning and dishes and many more of those stories are HD so not really great for wireless.

I have most of my recipes in a database.

I am also working on a series of databases which do recipe / accounts and stock management which means I will need barcode readers by the bin (oh RFID why have you let me down).

Mostly I use notebooks because I tend to have lots of them lying around and they are cheap and easy to upgrade. You can get reasonable quality waterproof skins for most notebooks, you won't be able to touch type but they are used in serious environments so a kitchen will be fine. You will also find that most notebooks have a pretty decent membrane under the keyboard so a wine spill will actually only toast the keyboard in most situations. New keyboards should be about $30 from most repair places as it is really a 5 minute job.

tor, i only skimmed responses, but am i right in saying you are going to have stairs down to the cellar (don't tell the rea it's a pantry, and certainly don't tell them it's a vault)? it would be really cool if you conceal this somehow, so when the door to the 'cellar' is closed you wouldn't know there is anything else there.

The stairs are actually to go to the downstairs house. Currently there is no internal connection between them. Concealing them would be tricky and anyone that comes to the house can see the downstairs house. It stands out a bit :)

Concealing the door into the pantry shouldn't be hard though and I do love secret things. Will talk this through with the builder for sure.

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Okey dokey. I now have no kitchen, Presumably for at least 4 or 5 days.

No sink. No oven. No gas top.

Empty room with some stainless steel work benches hauled up from the manly room, a microwave and a small desktop type oven. I have a barbecue.

Recipes please.

Tonight is takeaways but I can't face that for days on end and salads get boring plus I only pre washed enough lettuce for maybe two salads.

Think of this as your chance to convert me to some kind of easy quick cooking :)

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Oh and ruffian your nuclear lighting idea got the builder thinking (unlike the kitchen designer guy who added no new lights).

We are pulling out the ventilator hood but we decided to leave the wood bit sticking down with the power cable live and will chuck a remote control dealy (some $20 thing from china) in there and have 4 halogens pointed straight down at the cooking surface (but focus moveable). No dimmer on them due to the remote control aspect but an easy repair / upgrade if something better comes along.

Gotta say the builder is totally on my wave length and is coming up with ideas as silly as mine now. He just rebuilt the entire window to make it symmetrical with the other one and I grabbed some lights to match the others over the sink.

I think looking and smelling like a scumbag helps in these situations, anyone I don't get on with tends to not come back, the ones that do understand that I will be pissed if something is not lines up correctly.

I spent the afternoon carrying crap with some 16 yr old apprentice. Best fun I have had in a while.

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Okey dokey. I now have no kitchen, Presumably for at least 4 or 5 days.

No sink. No oven. No gas top.

Empty room with some stainless steel work benches hauled up from the manly room, a microwave and a small desktop type oven. I have a barbecue.

Recipes please.

Tonight is takeaways but I can't face that for days on end and salads get boring plus I only pre washed enough lettuce for maybe two salads.

Think of this as your chance to convert me to some kind of easy quick cooking :)

Simple soups - udon noodles/pho/laksa - heat the broth, fill your bowls with fresh (supermarket) or recently boiled (microwave?) noodles and any herbage or flavourings you might like, (including mint, basil, beansprouts, spring onion, a few prawns, sliced redcooked pork if you have it, curry paste, wakami, chilies) whatever you have and that sounds good together. Pour the boiling broth into the bowls, leave for a couple of minutes. Eat. Not much washing up, and very satisfying because it can be exactly as you want it to be.

Baked sweet or irish potatoes, with whatever topping sounds good at the time.

Some sort of frittata, using cold cooked vegetables (canned or frozen will do in a pinch, defrost and drain and then dust with a little flour to stop them being watery) mixed with whatever bacony/cheesy flavourings you have on hand and herbs (spring onion, dill, basil, whatever). Add enough seasoned beaten egg mixed with about one quarter volume milk to cover the veggie mix.

Pour into a flattish greased pan, sprinkle with more cheese if you like. This can be cooked in a toaster oven (use a flatter dish, it will take a while, on a lower temp), and possibly on the dying embers of a BBQ if you are careful, and the best thing is that it is great cold and so can provide excellent snacks and lunches.

Bruschetta - chunky slices of bread toasted and rubbed with lots of garlic, drizzled with oil, sprinkled with coarse salt. (This is good on it's own - try it). Or you can add just about anything as a topping. Toaster ovens were made for this!

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Honestly I'd see this point in my life (ie waiting for a new kitchen) as a perfect time for evaluating my local takeaways. (We've got no choice babe)

I thought for a long time (as much as the ADHD drugs allowed anyways) I came up with a sausage in a bun. No sink means no hygiene in the kitchen and that kills all my cool BBQ ideas.

Order in.

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Honestly I'd see this point in my life (ie waiting for a new kitchen) as a perfect time for evaluating my local takeaways. (We've got no choice babe)

I thought for a long time (as much as the ADHD drugs allowed anyways) I came up with a sausage in a bun. No sink means no hygiene in the kitchen and that kills all my cool BBQ ideas.

Order in.

After two mornings of making coffee with no sink or running water the hassle involved in doing anything is making this the attractive option :)

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Honestly I'd see this point in my life (ie waiting for a new kitchen) as a perfect time for evaluating my local takeaways. (We've got no choice babe)

I thought for a long time (as much as the ADHD drugs allowed anyways) I came up with a sausage in a bun. No sink means no hygiene in the kitchen and that kills all my cool BBQ ideas.

Order in.

Cop out!

Tor seems to have been blessed with a GF who loves the clean, and so I'd bet my bottom dollar the laundry is plenty clean enough for most kitchen purposes. Most other kitchen needs can be sorted out with a jug for the clean water and a bucket or big bowl for the not-clean water.

Take away isn't as appealing as you think it will be, any how. I recently returned from a holiday where most of the family wanted takeaway every night, and it gets downright queasy-making after the second or third night in a row. It is (assuming it is of a decent standard) tasty enough but doesn't have enough veggies etc, as well as the general tendency to too much fat/salt etc. Except maybe sushi. I do love the sushi.

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Cop out!

Tor seems to have been blessed with a GF who loves the clean, and so I'd bet my bottom dollar the laundry is plenty clean enough for most kitchen purposes. Most other kitchen needs can be sorted out with a jug for the clean water and a bucket or big bowl for the not-clean water.

Take away isn't as appealing as you think it will be, any how. I recently returned from a holiday where most of the family wanted takeaway every night, and it gets downright queasy-making after the second or third night in a row. It is (assuming it is of a decent standard) tasty enough but doesn't have enough veggies etc, as well as the general tendency to too much fat/salt etc. Except maybe sushi. I do love the sushi.

Laundry is downstairs :(

However she is on the hunt now for a camping sink, if she can't find one I will jerry rig a sink when the kitchen is delivered and installed, tuesday.

By takeaway we are actually thinking of doing a roaming restaurant test for those 4 nights. There are at least 4 that we want to try in the local area.

Aside from that I bought a bunch of paper plates today and, if the install works but we have no power or other problems, I then can cook in tinfoil and eat of paper for a few days quite happily.

With the noodle thing you described (which is currently on the agenda as I will certainly get bored of leaving the house for food) what do you use for broth? Just chicken stock in a box is okay? I have used that as a fudge a few times and it was acceptable (I did learn not to reduce it though hehehehe)

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Laundry is downstairs :(

However she is on the hunt now for a camping sink, if she can't find one I will jerry rig a sink when the kitchen is delivered and installed, tuesday.

By takeaway we are actually thinking of doing a roaming restaurant test for those 4 nights. There are at least 4 that we want to try in the local area.

Aside from that I bought a bunch of paper plates today and, if the install works but we have no power or other problems, I then can cook in tinfoil and eat of paper for a few days quite happily.

With the noodle thing you described (which is currently on the agenda as I will certainly get bored of leaving the house for food) what do you use for broth? Just chicken stock in a box is okay? I have used that as a fudge a few times and it was acceptable (I did learn not to reduce it though hehehehe)

Camping sink?? By that you mean a bucket... don't you?

Re broth,

I often have some (pork and chicken) in the freezer, reduced down to jelly so it doesn't take up too much room. It's a by-product of a couple of dishes I make.

Failing that I prefer Massel stock cubes (not the Massel powder, which quite different - and is crap).

These are (allegedly) vegetarian - even the chicken and beef flavours - but they produce a broth that is savoury if not exactly chickenly. The boxed stuff just doesn't taste like food to me. Either way, use LOTS of herbs/seasonings to freshen up the flavour.

Japanese instant wakame or tofu soup will do, too, (but don't boil it).

You can get it in most supermarkets now, for about $4 for three sachets. As it beats the hell out of cup-a-soup there is usually some of that about the house also. If you go the Japanese route consider poaching a egg (runny yolk) to add to the noodle soup, it is unusual at first, but strangely addictive. A few sh*taake mushrooms sliced in don't hurt either.

And an aside about herbs fresh from the garden - I brought in a very big bunch of basil today, to make some pesto for the freezer.

Apparently I also brought in a large aggressive female red-back spider which scared the crap out of me a couple of hours later.

She was apparently planning to shack up next to the breadboards (on the bench next to the basil) and was prepared to defend her patch against all comers.

She's gone to god now (with the aid of a well aimed pint-glass), but just keep an eye out, all you green-thumb types...

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Camping sink?? By that you mean a bucket... don't you?

I don't have a kitchen downstairs, just a few stainless steel tables so I thought getting something slightly above a bucket would be cool as then I can use it downstairs.

I prefer Massel stock cubes

Japanese instant wakame or tofu soup will do, too, (but don't boil it).

Will look for that brand and I know the soup thingys but don't actually have any left (I use them for left over pork).

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