tor

Handy Dandy Tips

10 posts in this topic

Posting that hint is just an act of compassion, plain and simple.

Even better, I have a couple of those onion bags lounging around under the sink doing nothing...

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Posting that hint is just an act of compassion, plain and simple.

Even better, I have a couple of those onion bags lounging around under the sink doing nothing...

I normally buy my onions in handfuls on a regular basis and have a rotation system of wire baskets so I use them in order and always have good ones. After reading that tip I figure I will get at least one of these bags.

The clean up is actually the main reason I don't make my own pasta very often. If it works I see fresh pasta going back on the menu.

Oh another good tip:

Keep ginger and chillis in the freezer. They last forever and become so easy to chop / grate.

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I normally buy my onions in handfuls on a regular basis and have a rotation system of wire baskets so I use them in order and always have good ones. After reading that tip I figure I will get at least one of these bags.

The clean up is actually the main reason I don't make my own pasta very often. If it works I see fresh pasta going back on the menu.

Oh another good tip:

Keep ginger and chillis in the freezer. They last forever and become so easy to chop / grate.

you should get a column in the sunday courier mail. you'd give what's her name a run for money.

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Oh another good tip:

Keep ginger and chillis in the freezer. They last forever and become so easy to chop / grate.

A beauty. I've had Habs in the freezer for years, ready to flood the world with death sauce come the revolution.

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When buying mince for future use always ask for it in half kilo bags.

When you get it home untie the knot and then use a rolling pin to smush it down to about half a centimetre depth and try and make it even at the top (where the rolling pin has made it all wavy).

Then freeze it.

They stack better in the freezer (mince has at least a 6 month freezer life) and they defrost in a few hours in a fridge rather than a day two due to the increased surface area (even less in warm water if your body can deal with the odd bit of stuff, and et's face it everyone does this on occasion, on a stainless bench they also defrost fast because of the huge contact area).

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When buying mince for future use always ask for it in half kilo bags.

When you get it home untie the knot and then use a rolling pin to smush it down to about half a centimetre depth and try and make it even at the top (where the rolling pin has made it all wavy).

Then freeze it.

They stack better in the freezer (mince has at least a 6 month freezer life) and they defrost in a few hours in a fridge rather than a day two due to the increased surface area (even less in warm water if your body can deal with the odd bit of stuff, and et's face it everyone does this on occasion, on a stainless bench they also defrost fast because of the huge contact area).

Mince.

The most versatile meat product of all.

When the children were growing up, we would go through 3 or 4 kilo's of mince a week.

It used to be the most economical meat as well. Not quite the case now.

When we killed our own, anything that was not stewing meat, was minced.

Nothing like your own mince.

We still have a mincer attachment for the mix-master, and occasionally will buy cheap cuts of meat and mince them cheaper than buying processed mince.

My wife could have a mince dish on the table in about 10 minutes, if we had been out and the kids were tired.

She would often defrost in the microwave

Shepherds pie is still one of my favourites, even though I know to be pure, you're supposed to use lamb.

Curried mince on toast was a regular with the kids.

Ah! Memories....

Thanks tor.

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Mince.

The most versatile meat product of all.

When the children were growing up, we would go through 3 or 4 kilo's of mince a week.

It used to be the most economical meat as well. Not quite the case now.

When we killed our own, anything that was not stewing meat, was minced.

Nothing like your own mince.

We still have a mincer attachment for the mix-master, and occasionally will buy cheap cuts of meat and mince them cheaper than buying processed mince.

My wife could have a mince dish on the table in about 10 minutes, if we had been out and the kids were tired.

She would often defrost in the microwave

Shepherds pie is still one of my favourites, even though I know to be pure, you're supposed to use lamb.

Curried mince on toast was a regular with the kids.

Ah! Memories....

Thanks tor.

The girlfriend makes a brilliant shepherds pie. She uses mince and random fridge veges. I eat it with branstons chilli relish (which I fortunately bought a case of as they don't make it anymore).

I used to make fried mince at uni where you fry onions then mince, add some frozen peas and beans and worcestershire sauce. Served on spuds is awesome.

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Shepherds pie is still one of my favourites, even though I know to be pure, you're supposed to use lamb.

Curried mince on toast was a regular with the kids.

Ah! Memories....

Thanks tor.

You could call it cottage pie.

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When a bit of eggshell gets into the egg you just cracked into a bowl, use a larger, empty part of the eggshell to scoop it back out again.

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