staringclown

Got Water?

19 posts in this topic

Looking forward to seeing the murray basin water plan (when we get a government). In the mean time, straight from the environment today - the murrumbidgee is flowing :) , Canberras dams are at 66% :) and I can wash my car again soon. <_<

post-106-12836764267995_thumb.jpg

And canberra is green...

post-106-12836764465703_thumb.jpg

Floods in Victoria too.

Edit: punctuation

Edited by staringclown

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

and I can wash my car again soon. <_<

i just wait or a heavy rain and then back my car out from under the carport. break out the sponge and the car is clean in 10 minutes. of course the neighbours all think i'm mad, and one does get a little soaked...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yeah okaparinga river is flowing heavily out to sea, right past the de-sal plant. most damns here in SA are near capacity. may even see the mouth of murry washed out and some of that salt washed out to sea.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

...of course the neighbours all think i'm mad...

Is that the only reason though?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Water is big business in Australia.

Considering that most governments get water for nothing. Someone/something provides it.

They still know how to charge to get it to your kitchen sink.

Note this little article in the Gold Coast Bulletin.

COUNCILLOR Eddy Sarroff has today continued talking about his claims the Gold Coast can expect a major financial windfall from the new water regime, despite Mayor Ron Clarke banning him from discussing budget matters.

The fight between the two erupted this week after Cr Sarroff highlighted that council could expect to pick up between $1 and $2 billion now that Allconnex had taken over the water business for council.

Cr Clarke disputes the numbers and has taken away Cr Sarroff's right to talk about budget matters, even though he is the head of finance.

I'm all for paying for infrastructure costs, but why not tell the people the truth.

Edited by Solomon

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well it's out and it's big. 37%-45% cuts.The completely remodelling of the basin. How do we all feel about that?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The basin is the largest and deepest artesian basin in the world, stretching over a total of 1,711,000 square kilometres (661,000 sq mi), with temperatures measured ranging from 30°C to 100°C.[1] It underlies 23% of the continent, including most of Queensland, the south-east corner of the Northern Territory, the north-east part of South Australia, and northern New South Wales. The basin is 3,000 metres (9,800 ft) deep in places and is estimated to contain 64,900 cubic kilometres (15,600 cu mi) of groundwater.[2] The Great Artesian Basin Coordinating Committee (GABCC)[3] coordinates activity between the various levels of government and community organisations.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Artesian_Basin

Better info

http://www.derm.qld.gov.au/factsheets/pdf/water/w68.pdf

gabmap.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well it's out and it's big. 37%-45% cuts.The completely remodelling of the basin. How do we all feel about that?

Turns out that the ACT will cop a 45% reduction. <_< I'm now personally setting a copy of the report on fire.

Unfortunately everybody thinks somebody else should suffer in the competition for a scarce resource (in this wide brown land). If we solve it it will be a model for the rest of the world. (And I do believe they are watching) If we don't then those of us in affected communities will suffer equally in the longer term and with a lot less time to adjust. The drought has already seen people in the basin deal with 70% cuts. It's raining now but we're in a la nina. Drought is the norm. Even without global warming.

A few principles for discussion.

Reward those farmers who've moved toward water efficient farming already

Buy out those that are already struggling (price is always the issue) What is "fair value" if the farmer has a massive debt hangover and planned to trade out it when the drought broke?

Can communities diversify and survive? In large part it's up to the communities themselves. Some will no doubt. Some won't. A sweetener to remove the inefficient farmers from the land. (You know who you are!) Nothing too lucrative - but generous enough to work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Turns out that the ACT will cop a 45% reduction. <_< I'm now personally setting a copy of the report on fire.

Unfortunately everybody thinks somebody else should suffer in the competition for a scarce resource (in this wide brown land). If we solve it it will be a model for the rest of the world. (And I do believe they are watching) If we don't then those of us in affected communities will suffer equally in the longer term and with a lot less time to adjust. The drought has already seen people in the basin deal with 70% cuts. It's raining now but we're in a la nina. Drought is the norm. Even without global warming.

A few principles for discussion.

Reward those farmers who've moved toward water efficient farming already

Buy out those that are already struggling (price is always the issue) What is "fair value" if the farmer has a massive debt hangover and planned to trade out it when the drought broke?

Can communities diversify and survive? In large part it's up to the communities themselves. Some will no doubt. Some won't. A sweetener to remove the inefficient farmers from the land. (You know who you are!) Nothing too lucrative - but generous enough to work.

No comment on the artesian basin SC?

Always wondered about Alberqueque and Phoenix being desert 1M+ cities living on artesian water.

Aussie oi oi oi: Its underground and may be mineralised. f*ck that just burn reports.

Me: More cotton and rice growing too. Major water sucking contributors to the food bowl. Yay.

waterski holiday to Kununarra?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lake_Argyle

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry to gloat but just found out today we have a natural spring on our land.

The house will probably fall down but, hey, we will have water!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry to gloat but just found out today we have a natural spring on our land.

The house will probably fall down but, hey, we will have water!

Massive ammounts of subterrain water doesn't count (see my post a few above). Now flood your land to grow rice (we need rice grown in SE Australia :rolleyes: ); Refuse to move to the Kimberley if you refuse to grow anything else more sustainable; Appear on national TV bleating; and, burn a report...continue to grow rice. Bingo.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Could solar or wind powered desal make using that artesian basin water a practical proposition?

As for the water cuts, I really don't know anywhere near enough to say whether or not they are enough/too much, but it's quite clear to me that it's an inherently limited resource, and we can't keep taking as much water as we wish from the river system, so it seems reasonable to cap usage, and let the market price the water according to the scarcity that those limits create. If that means it's no longer economic to grow rice or cotton in SE aus, then so be it.

Bernard, the wiki link suggests there were issues with growing rice up north (the birds kept eating it), but it does seem more sensible to grow the water hungry crops where there's an abundance of it, and maybe these technical issues can be overcome.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No comment on the artesian basin SC?

Always wondered about Alberqueque and Phoenix being desert 1M+ cities living on artesian water.

Aussie oi oi oi: Its underground and may be mineralised. f*ck that just burn reports.

Me: More cotton and rice growing too. Major water sucking contributors to the food bowl. Yay.

waterski holiday to Kununarra?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lake_Argyle

Yeah sorry mate. Just no-one is arguing over the artesian basin at the moment. Plus from memory they cleaned their act up a few years back now. They went around and capped all of the wells that were open at least. Was also a big debate about whether it was a closed system but I believe that was debunked. Gotta watch the salt content though. The further west you go the saltier it gets. I think they're managing the basin sustainably at the moment. I haven't heard otherwise. Goes to show it can be done.

We used to holiday at lake argyle. Apparently they tried growing rice up there and the water fowl ate it all. Begs the question why aren't they farming water fowl but no ones made the connection yet. :)

Cotton and rice aren't the most suitable for an arid continent. For all the water Cubby station consumes they've still gone bust. (Actually I heard they might survive). I had prickly pear the other night with a mexican meal. Tastes fine with copious amounts of tequila.

There's a lot of pissed off people around here now. I can understand why. Gillard claimed during the election labour would adopt the plan wholesale. Now it's become a draft of a guide for a plan which they may, in the fullness of time, after appropriate checks and balances have been performed, implement as policy.

What was so hard about saying they consult up front? Was it a quick check to see how angry people would get? All that does is further harden attitudes toward anything they ever want to do in the bush good or bad. I haven't heard many people saying that that there is no overallocation of water but no-one now trusts the government.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had prickly pear the other night with a mexican meal. Tastes fine with copious amounts of tequila.

Didn't know you could eat them?

I like the look of the potential distribution you might be onto something ;) Just have to work out what foreign insect / toad etc to bring in to eath these parasitic moths...

Maybe this is what gen z is going to be faced with; the life of being a prickly pear farmer in Australia's deserts because we have "used all the other good land up".

S12-map.gif

http://www.weeds.org.au/cgi-bin/weedident.cgi?tpl=plant.tpl&ibra=all&card=S12

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Didn't know you could eat them?

I like the look of the potential distribution you might be onto something ;) Just have to work out what foreign insect / toad etc to bring in to eath these parasitic moths...

Maybe this is what gen z is going to be faced with; the life of being a prickly pear farmer in Australia's deserts because we have "used all the other good land up".

S12-map.gif

http://www.weeds.org.au/cgi-bin/weedident.cgi?tpl=plant.tpl&ibra=all&card=S12

Good lord man!

How to Eat Prickly Pear Cactus

My first suggestion would be to not peel them yourself but buy them in a jar. You are buying from mexico (given the high dollar they're a bargain) and apart from having to spit out the odd stray bullet, you avoid the spikes Ask for nopales and tell em the clown sent you.

They're like chokos - which I think are also mexican.

Enough cane toad stew with nopales and you start to believe that the murray darling will bloom forever given recent events. Government are walking away from the deal. The water is flowing again in Canberra. The restrictions are gone and ACTEWAGL are telling me to once again hose down my driveway rather than sweep.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Talking about the Murray-Darling Basin LINK

DRILLING fluid linked to a coal seam gas (CSG) project has leaked into a Queensland river that is part of the Murray-Darling Basin.

The leak occurred when contractors for coal seam gas company QGC were drilling to run a pipeline underneath the Condamine River in Queensland's southwest.

Environment Minister Andrew Powell released a statement today saying his department was investigating the spill but he did not say when the incident occurred or how much fluid polluted the river.

He said a limited amount of fluid seeped from the drill hole but had since been contained within a wall of sandbags and pumped out.

Drilling has stopped at the site while an investigation is underway.

Mr Powell said his department wants to address the risk of further potential impacts.

"Work will not resume until the department has reviewed the assessment and decided whether the operation can be undertaken without further impact," Mr Powell said.

"The operations of coal seam gas companies and their contractors are being closely monitored and where necessary, changes will be made to operational practices to ensure environmental safety is maintained."

More comment has been sought from Mr Powell.

Edited by Easy Tiger

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Talking about the Murray-Darling Basin LINK

[/size][/font]

CSG is completely safe and is subject to strict environmental standards. No way known will it screw up prime agricultural land. Go back to sleep Australia. You're government is in control.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And meanwhile on the other side of the continent the nascent mining industry in SA looks like it is largely dependent on using fossil water from the Great Artesian Basin.

It's either that, or a string of expensive and poorly planned privately owned desal plants pushing hypersaline brine into the Gulf.

Hurray for the mining boom!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now