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What to cook this weekend...

36 posts in this topic

What to cook this weekend--i'm open to suggestions. ground rules are as follows:

*exotic spices/sauces should be kept to a minimum (or be easily replaced by more mundane equivalents)

*exotic cooking equipment is out--i don't have any.

*should take time. cooking while listening to audio book on ipod while drinking is the goal.

*kid friendly, no eggs, no nuts. (kids can handle the heat tho--better than me)

*if it involves making a bread from scratch you get extra points.

i've been doing the pizza, lasagna, roast chicken thing for too long.

in terms of ingredients that we have on hand (meats anyway) your standard beef, lamb, chicken cuts and a pretty nice pork leg roast (they mispriced a $12.00 roast for $1.20! woot!).

yours in anticipation...

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Don't cook. You are just playing into the food conglomerates' hands. Let them squeal through fasting. If we all stop eating we can take them down.

Edited by sydney3000

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What is the weather going to be like?

good question - since its canberra i'm guessing cold, wet and windy. just checked the weather forecast and yep, from -1 to 14. woot.

lol @ sydney. but i get to eat dead animals.... that's gotta count for something.

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good question - since its canberra i'm guessing cold, wet and windy. just checked the weather forecast and yep, from -1 to 14. woot.

lol @ sydney. but i get to eat dead animals.... that's gotta count for something.

I would go slow roasted pork with braised cabbage and apple with a roasted apple sauce.

Roast pork at about 130 for some 8 hrs in a tray with a rack and have the apples and onions underneath plus some water to keep the oven full of steam and stop stuff burning in the tray. Cooking at low temps usually gets me way more juices.

Then remove the pork skin and dry it with paper towels and score and salt it put aside. Wrap the pork in tinfoil and return to the oven.

Slice the cabbage (use that pickled red cabbage if you have some, normal raw savoy if not but then add a bit of vinegar to beat down the sweetness of the apple and sometimes some sugar to balance it) and put it in a pot with some of the apples and let it simmer for an hour adding water as required (or even some juices if you have lots).

Put the juices and onions and rest of the apples into something to let the fat rise to the top and skim it but chuck some into back into the roasting dish and add a little flour and make a dark roux (low temperatures and long cook til the flour browns). Use the juices to clean the bottom of the pan by scraping the roux to the side and deglazing vigourously in little areas at a time on a much higher heat.

The idea being that you get all the crud off the bottom of the pan into solution but don't let the roux go clumpy (so you have to keep stirring that stuff too).

Then add all the soft roasted onions and apples dripping with pork juices and let it simmer. Add water / stock if required. Pepper the crap out of it.

Take pork from oven.

Put the oven up to a million degrees and put the pork skin in to crackle.

Check the temperature of the pork and put it into the million degree oven if you need to (but hopefully you won't).

Bash the cabbage and apples a bit if they haven't gone way soft.

Eat it all up. Have a slice of bread with it :)

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thanks tor, that sounds very tasty. i could do a baguette to go along with it i suppose. the main problem, however, is that i only have small convection/microwave dual purpose thingy. its very good for small job and terrible for roasts (it has to rotate as the heat source is in one spot and big roasting pans bump into the side...). i could go on the bbq, i suppose. loosely covered with foil perhaps. it sounds damned good, though if i drink for 8 hours straight i won't be in any condition to eat (or care that i'm in no condition to eat).

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Don't cook. You are just playing into the food conglomerates' hands. Let them squeal through fasting. If we all stop eating we can take them down.

LOL!

That's all. I have no suggestion, I'm on lettuce all weekend.

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How about french onion soup? You can make the bread to use as the croutons on top if you want. You can also make the beef consomme if you want. Takes hours and makes the house smell nice. :) Great on a cold night.

French onion soup

60g butter, chopped

2 tablespoons olive oil

6 (1kg) brown onions, thinly sliced

2 teaspoons brown sugar

2 tablespoons plain flour

4 cups beef stock

Beef stock

2 kg beef bones lightly oiled and roasted till well brown

two sticks of celery

two carrots

two large onions

one leek

bouquet garni (fresh thyme, rosemary (not much), parsley, bay leaves)

one tomato halved

black pepper corns

Fry the roughly chopped onions, celery, carrots on low heat until onion is translucent.

add the roasted bones and everything else and cover with water. Let simmer for at least 4 hours. 6 is better.

Drain the stock. You can further reduce the stock if you want a stronger flavour.

You can use it as if you want. Or you can clarify it using eg whites and strain it through muslin cloth. Add the egg whites and shells to the boiling stock and stir til a raft of egg whites floats to the surface. You can use a spoon to skim it off. Then strain thought the muslin. This makes a clear consomme. You probably don't want to do this for french onion though as your adding flour to thicken slightly so it will be cloudy anyway. I generally try and make a big batch and freeze the leftover stock.

As an aside you can add pigs trotters to the recipe above and make "portable soup". This is an old fashioned stock cube. You just keep reducing the stock a the gelatine from the pork bones makes it set like a thick jelly. This can cut into cubes and frozen. It takes up less space than liquid stock as well. Handy for jus and soups. Aubrey Maturin books (Master and Commander etc) have a few references to it.

Ok back to the soup...

Fry on very low heat the onions in the butter until the onions are well cooked (40 mins) Add the sugar and caramelise them. Add the flour and cook for a couple of minutes stirring.

Add the stock until you get a not to thick liquid. It will thicken as you cook it and it reduces. Rub some garlic on some slices of bread (baguette style) with gruyere cheese on top.

Check the seasoning of the soup and add salt if required. Serve the soup with the bread on top.

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I would go slow roasted pork with braised cabbage and apple with a roasted apple sauce.

Roast pork at about 130 for some 8 hrs in a tray with a rack and have the apples and onions underneath plus some water to keep the oven full of steam and stop stuff burning in the tray. Cooking at low temps usually gets me way more juices.

Then remove the pork skin and dry it with paper towels and score and salt it put aside. Wrap the pork in tinfoil and return to the oven.

Slice the cabbage (use that pickled red cabbage if you have some, normal raw savoy if not but then add a bit of vinegar to beat down the sweetness of the apple and sometimes some sugar to balance it) and put it in a pot with some of the apples and let it simmer for an hour adding water as required (or even some juices if you have lots).

Put the juices and onions and rest of the apples into something to let the fat rise to the top and skim it but chuck some into back into the roasting dish and add a little flour and make a dark roux (low temperatures and long cook til the flour browns). Use the juices to clean the bottom of the pan by scraping the roux to the side and deglazing vigourously in little areas at a time on a much higher heat.

The idea being that you get all the crud off the bottom of the pan into solution but don't let the roux go clumpy (so you have to keep stirring that stuff too).

Then add all the soft roasted onions and apples dripping with pork juices and let it simmer. Add water / stock if required. Pepper the crap out of it.

Take pork from oven.

Put the oven up to a million degrees and put the pork skin in to crackle.

Check the temperature of the pork and put it into the million degree oven if you need to (but hopefully you won't).

Bash the cabbage and apples a bit if they haven't gone way soft.

Eat it all up. Have a slice of bread with it :)

Damn this sounds good.

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What to cook this weekend--i'm open to suggestions. ground rules are as follows:

*exotic spices/sauces should be kept to a minimum (or be easily replaced by more mundane equivalents)

*exotic cooking equipment is out--i don't have any.

*should take time. cooking while listening to audio book on ipod while drinking is the goal.

*kid friendly, no eggs, no nuts. (kids can handle the heat tho--better than me)

*if it involves making a bread from scratch you get extra points.

i've been doing the pizza, lasagna, roast chicken thing for too long.

in terms of ingredients that we have on hand (meats anyway) your standard beef, lamb, chicken cuts and a pretty nice pork leg roast (they mispriced a $12.00 roast for $1.20! woot!).

yours in anticipation...

I've posted a link to this recipe before. It's a real winner but fails on your "should take time" criteria - > Chorizo and Capsicum Soup

My brother cooked up a beer but chicken for us the other day. By far the best chicken I've ever had. Whilst I don't have the recipe that he used (he won't share :fyou:) I will be checking out a couple on the net and cook the easiest one this Sunday. Beer Butt Chicken The best thing is that the recipe forces you to buy beer. :thumbup:

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This has the bread thing in spades. A lovely young french girl made it for me when I was there, she said that serving it with sausages was a sin when I mentioned I had heard of it but never tried it and would really like to.

Her opinion was that if it is done right and you have a really good baguette it is the all time best food in the world. The baguette was important, at her local bakery she went through half a dozen before choosing one.

I was drinking wine with a lovely french girl (that admired my naginata skills) and obviously I thought it was excellent, so much so I didn't remember to ask for the recipe. I keep an eye out for tomme cheese because when i see it I am going to have a few goes at making it. Apparently anything except tomme is a waste of time.

Obviously I don't have a recipe but there are many on the net, I have saved this in my bookmarks because it reads as close to what she made, I suspect she used about 4 or 5 times as much garlic though as garlic was definitely there as a dominant flavour.

http://www.toomanychefs.net/archives/001250.php

Make that and eat it from the pot on bread with a light bodied red wine. I think we were drinking a beaujolais.

Stirring it took a longish time (maybe half an hour) and was fairly ad hoc, bit of a stir, bit of a drink, bit of a chat type thing. She did it on really low temperatures.

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This has the bread thing in spades. A lovely young french girl made it for me when I was there, she said that serving it with sausages was a sin when I mentioned I had heard of it but never tried it and would really like to.

Her opinion was that if it is done right and you have a really good baguette it is the all time best food in the world. The baguette was important, at her local bakery she went through half a dozen before choosing one.

I was drinking wine with a lovely french girl (that admired my naginata skills) and obviously I thought it was excellent, so much so I didn't remember to ask for the recipe. I keep an eye out for tomme cheese because when i see it I am going to have a few goes at making it. Apparently anything except tomme is a waste of time.

Obviously I don't have a recipe but there are many on the net, I have saved this in my bookmarks because it reads as close to what she made, I suspect she used about 4 or 5 times as much garlic though as garlic was definitely there as a dominant flavour.

http://www.toomanychefs.net/archives/001250.php

Make that and eat it from the pot on bread with a light bodied red wine. I think we were drinking a beaujolais.

Stirring it took a longish time (maybe half an hour) and was fairly ad hoc, bit of a stir, bit of a drink, bit of a chat type thing. She did it on really low temperatures.

Lovely young french girls, wine and cheesy mash do sound very appealing. :smoke:

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Lovely young french girls, wine and cheesy mash do sound very appealing. :smoke:

I freely admit that her presence and obvious enjoyment in making the food added to the situation.

(now that I am taken, tubby and old I doubt that type of thing is likely to ever happen again :))

It kicked the crap out of the usual "bung cheese in the mashed tatties" though.

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I freely admit that her presence and obvious enjoyment in making the food added to the situation.

(now that I am taken, tubby and old I doubt that type of thing is likely to ever happen again :))

It kicked the crap out of the usual "bung cheese in the mashed tatties" though.

Don't give up hope dude. A lot of young french girls have a penchant for the older, tubbier man. :) You see it a lot in french movies.*

*OK - I made that bit up

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Don't give up hope dude. A lot of young french girls have a penchant for the older, tubbier man. :) You see it a lot in french movies.*

*OK - I made that bit up

Given my current lifestyle I am astounded that I retain the "taken" bit... not going to _try_ to make things worse by chasing young girlies around :)

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well i think it will be the slow roast pork tomorrow, though 8 hours might be a bit much. may cut it down to 3 and see what happens... sounds mighty tasty though.

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*OK - I made that bit up

Not completely. Gerard Depardieu has starred in 94 movies, and as far as I can tell, has bagged at least 1 girl who is too young and too hot for him in every one.

That alligot sounds like the business.

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What to cook this weekend--i'm open to suggestions. ground rules are as follows:

*exotic spices/sauces should be kept to a minimum (or be easily replaced by more mundane equivalents)

*exotic cooking equipment is out--i don't have any.

*should take time. cooking while listening to audio book on ipod while drinking is the goal.

*kid friendly, no eggs, no nuts. (kids can handle the heat tho--better than me)

*if it involves making a bread from scratch you get extra points.

i've been doing the pizza, lasagna, roast chicken thing for too long.

in terms of ingredients that we have on hand (meats anyway) your standard beef, lamb, chicken cuts and a pretty nice pork leg roast (they mispriced a $12.00 roast for $1.20! woot!).

yours in anticipation...

Korean food!

I've been on a real Korean kick lately.

High flavour and relatively low calorie. There is a bit of chili but you can moderate that easily enough.

And you get to eat with these nifty steel chopsticks.

img55713129.jpg

Bulgogi, Bibimbap, pickles.

The food is much easier to cook than I thought, and although there are a lot of dud recipes out there (the US ones are often particularly dodgy) there are some which are really great.

http://www.hannaone.com/Recipe/gallery/Hannaone%27s_Korean_Recipe_Gallery.htm

I'm planning to make kimchi (which you can also buy in various plastic packages) as soon as I can get the right sort of cabbage.

The chili powder turns out to be easier to get than the cabbage - go figure - but that is OK as it also turns out to be very flavourful and not as hot as you might expect.

My folks used to make sauerkraut, so the whole fermenty cabbage thing is strangely enticing...

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Not completely. Gerard Depardieu has starred in 94 movies, and as far as I can tell, has bagged at least 1 girl who is too young and too hot for him in every one.

That alligot sounds like the business.

Good point! I'd forgotten about old Gerard. Only 94 films you say. Feels like a lot more. :D

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Korean food!

I've been on a real Korean kick lately.

High flavour and relatively low calorie. There is a bit of chili but you can moderate that easily enough.

And you get to eat with these nifty steel chopsticks.

img55713129.jpg

Bulgogi, Bibimbap, pickles.

The food is much easier to cook than I thought, and although there are a lot of dud recipes out there (the US ones are often particularly dodgy) there are some which are really great.

http://www.hannaone.com/Recipe/gallery/Hannaone%27s_Korean_Recipe_Gallery.htm

I'm planning to make kimchi (which you can also buy in various plastic packages) as soon as I can get the right sort of cabbage.

The chili powder turns out to be easier to get than the cabbage - go figure - but that is OK as it also turns out to be very flavourful and not as hot as you might expect.

My folks used to make sauerkraut, so the whole fermenty cabbage thing is strangely enticing...

My old man makes the best kimchi this side of Pusan. I try and prise a recipe from him.

I was given a set of pure silver korean chopsticks at my brothers wedding. They turn black in the presence of arsenic. Which was a handy thing in Korea back in the day I'm reliably informed.

Chap che noodles (sweet potato) and Bulgalbi (beef short ribs) are pretty good

Chap che

Ingredients:

8 oz mung bean or sweet potato noodles (might be called cellophane or glass noodles or Chinese vermicelli)

1 sweet onion, sliced into thin strips

2 cloves garlic, finely chopped

1/2 pound baby spinach, parboiled

2 carrots, julienned

3 scallions, chopped

1/2 cup chopped Napa cabbage

5 shiitake mushrooms, rehydrated if dried and then sliced

2 Tbsp vegetable or olive oil

2 Tbsp sesame oil

3 Tbsp soy sauce

1 tsp sugar

Salt to taste

Sesame seeds (optional)

6 oz. beef or pork (optional)*

Method:

Cook noodles according to package directions.

In a large pan or wok over medium heat, heat vegetable (or olive) oil and 1 Tbsp sesame oil.

Add onion slices and garlic and sauté for about 1 minute.

Add rest of vegetables and cook for 4-5 minutes, until the vegetables are half-cooked and still a bit crispy.

Turn heat to low and add cooked noodles, meat (if using), soy sauce, sugar, and the remaining sesame oil.

Mix to combine and cook for another 2 minutes.

Add salt or more soy sauce if needed.

If using sesame seeds, add them at finish

Bulgalbi

Ingredients : Serves 8-10 as an appetizer or 4 as a main dish

2 kg Beef short ribs

1/2 cup Soy sauce

1/2 cup Water

4 tablespoons Finely chopped spring onions

2 teaspoons Finely grated garlic

1 teaspoon Finely grated fresh ginger

1 tablespoon Sugar

1/2 teaspoon Ground Black pepper

2 tablespoons Toasted, crushed sesame seeds

Method :

Ask the butcher to saw through the bones to make cubes of about 5 cm size.

Hold pieces on board, bone downwards, and with a sharp knife cut halfway through meat in small dice to let marinade penetrate.

Combine the remaining ingredients in a large bowl, add the short ribs and mix well.

Cover and chill overnight, or at least 4 hours.

Prepare domed grill or hibachi well ahead of cooking time so coals have an hour or more to achieve the steady glow necessary for successful cooking.

Put meat on grill with bone side downwards and cook until brown.

Turn and cook other side until well done.

Turn pieces frequently, so that all sides are grilled brown and crisp.

The short ribs are intended to be picked up with the fingers for eating.

Note : Bulgalbi can also be cooked under a preheated griller or oven-roasted. Short ribs should be in one layer in roasting pan. Roast in moderately hot oven for 1 hour, turning pieces over halfway through cooking.

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My old man makes the best kimchi this side of Pusan. I try and prise a recipe from him.

I was given a set of pure silver korean chopsticks at my brothers wedding. They turn black in the presence of arsenic. Which was a handy thing in Korea back in the day I'm reliably informed.

Chap che noodles (sweet potato) and Bulgalbi (beef short ribs) are pretty good

I envy you both your chopsticks and your recipes! I'll try the Chap che as soon as I get the noodles.

Your Bulgalbi is the same as my 'bulgolgi', (probably the result of a dodgy translation).

The recipe I use has about half a nashi pear in with the garlic and spring onion, which is all vitamised together to create the marinade. It's to add sweetness I think, and there is also a fairly generous slosh of vinegar which improves it in some mysterious but quite noticeable way. Otherwise, it's very similar and really, really good.

Please post the Kimchi recipe if you can.

Each family seems to have their own way, and it would be great to try a proper recipe rather than a generic off the net. Some other pickle recipes would be good, too - all those dozens of side dishes, each unique and tasty...mmm...

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korean is fantastic but the wife makes it so much better than i do. keep us informed of your home-made kimchi experiments, ruffian--would be fantastic to make better-than-store-bought kimchi. i had an extended business trip to korea a few years ago with kimchi for breakfast lunch and dinner and *man* was it good! after you eat it regularly for a little while meals without kimchi just seem a bit barren... the local korean shop isn't bad but not the same. i do love korean food--had the best bbq of my life in cheongju. kind of depressing, actually, because i doubt i will ever meet its equal (worth trying tho).

wife and kids are off to the ancestral home for 3 weeks, so i have ample opportunity to experiment in the coming days. much easier to be ambitious in one's cooking when you are going to be the only victim. mastering a korean dish or two that the wife doesn't already do (her bulgogi is pretty amazing tho) is on the list. chorizo soup sounds pretty good too...

but for tomorrow its pork roast with a baguette (just because).

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thanks for all the suggestions. in the end somewhat slowly roasted pork was the winner. roasted for about 3 hours instead of 8, ditched the cabbage too (i like my cabbage raw or not at all... i know, i'm a freak) but it went over well the family. kids loved the roast potatoes and applesauce, wife loved it all (esp. as i did the washing up too). didn't have time back the bread though... that's the only fly in the ointment. a crunchy baguette with butter to sop up some of the gravy would've been perfect...

looking forward to experimenting with the other recipes next weekend.

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My old man makes the best kimchi this side of Pusan. I try and prise a recipe from him.

Got it!

This is for rather a lot of kimchi. My folks used to have Korean boarders so they went through a bit of the stuff. The recipe can be adjusted proportionally

Old man clowns kimchi recipe

Ingredients:

6 chinese cabbages

1 1/2 cups korean chilli powder (Must be korean and is available in big bags)

1 daikon radish julienned

1 carrot julienned

1 onion

1 bunch green shallots

1 bunch garlic chives

1 head garlic

1 tsp sugar

2 inch knob of ginger

thai fish sauce (you can get korean fish sauce but the koreans I know prefer the thai)

salt

Method:

Cut the cabbages in quarters length wise and place into a big container

sprinkle salt onto the cabbages and leave overnight

Rinse the salt from the cabbages and drain stacked together and upside down.

Important: Squeeze as much moisture from them as you can so you don't end up with watery kimchi

The cabbages should be limp by now.

In a blender blend the garlic. ginger, chilli powder, onion and enough fish sauce to make a thin toothpaste consistency.

Chop up the cabbage into reasonably large chunks.

Add everything and mix well so that all the leaves are coated with the chilli mixture.

Place glass jars into the oven on 120 c and leave for twenty minutes.

Place the kimchi mix into the jars and leave out to ferment for a few days (Qld) in canberra they can be left longer. SA depends on the season.

Don't overfill the jars because apparently the mix will expand slightly when fermenting.

Eat.

Edited by staringclown

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Just took a call from some frantic Koreans insisting that the salting time should be three hours rather than o/night. They were insistent that the cabbage crunchiness is important. Do with it what you will.

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