Max Carnage

I like trees and I like shrubs and plants and trees and shrubs and plants

36 posts in this topic

I planted one of these in the backyard today:

weeping_elm.jpg

Or:

ulmus_glabra_pendula_horiz.jpg

Also with leaves:

212.jpg

I've always liked Camperdown Elms - this is similar, if not secretly the same. It's funny - the main tree is grafted on to sturdy rootstock, and the weeping bit is grafted on top. I wonder why?

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Same reason roses and fruit trees are grafted?

I took stock of my potted plants yesterday. I got a bit carried away with pepper trees and olive trees. Not native, but I have a big empty paddock at the other house where these things grow well so I might take a box of them to the next inspection and stick em in the backyard. It gets really hard frosts there, we got -2 the other night and they got -10 :shocking:

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Same reason roses and fruit trees are grafted?

Yeah, but with those they usually have just 1 graft. This has one at the base and one at the top.

I think the reason is that the top is taken from a mature tree, the stem from a juvenile. You can't propagate the form of the top via seed because the genetic deformation doesn't make the transition, and you can't just take a big cutting and graft it to the base because it would look like a branch not a tree.

Or maybe it's just a quick way to get a 'standard' form. Lovely tree anyway (providing I can keep the elm beetles off it).

Those Peppercorn Trees have nice forms too IMO, but my wife hates them because they 'stink' and are invasive weeds around here.

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I planted one of these in the backyard today:

weeping_elm.jpg

Or:

ulmus_glabra_pendula_horiz.jpg

Also with leaves:

212.jpg

I've always liked Camperdown Elms - this is similar, if not secretly the same. It's funny - the main tree is grafted on to sturdy rootstock, and the weeping bit is grafted on top. I wonder why?

I like em too. But natives generally. I just can't resist their cute little survival tricks. Toxic leaves and fire generated germination (scarification). Like little phoenixes arising from the ashes.

Edit Oops germination not flowering.

Edited by staringclown

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I have a few natives I love, including Kanuka/Kanooka/Water Gum and the Currajong for trees (incidentally both very good bonsai!) and most 'boronias', Olive Berry, Lilacs (Hardenbergia), native violet, some hakeas... some flowering grasses too (names escape me). But I'm no fan of natives that are scraggly, prickly, grabby or cutty. Probably the result of years doing surveys in the bush.

Mostly I like traditional European formal and cottage gardens. And Japanese gardens (not those sandy ones though):

dsc03322.jpg

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I have a few natives I love, including Kanuka/Kanooka/Water Gum

Here's an ancient local (+/- a couple of hours drive) example:

giantkanuka.jpg

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Damn, you have serious green out your way.

I live smack bang in the middle of some quite productive farming areas so it is wheat and barley for miles and miles, with the occasional bit of trees only where its too rough to farm - eg, there is a beautiful spring fed gorge about 20 minutes drive away. Go a bit further and you hit the Mount Remarkable National park and of course the Flinders Ranges, but thats a bit over an hour away and has more of a reputation for red than green.

Mind you we do have the oldest plantation forest in Australia or something about 5 minutes down the road but those are straight trees in rows, just not the same :(

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Damn, you have serious green out your way.

I live smack bang in the middle of some quite productive farming areas so it is wheat and barley for miles and miles, with the occasional bit of trees only where its too rough to farm - eg, there is a beautiful spring fed gorge about 20 minutes drive away.

Farm land can be pretty too though. Here's where I was yesterday:

thefarm.jpg

I'm guessing yours is a different colour?

Go a bit further and you hit the Mount Remarkable National park and of course the Flinders Ranges, but thats a bit over an hour away and has more of a reputation for red than green.

We have some mountains too (just a bit past the farm). This was a week ago (right before I came home and the snow arrived to cover the tops of those shrubs):

themountain.jpg

All this within a couple of hours drive. Plus of course, the beach is well close. Okay, I'm done showing off now. ^_^

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I'm guessing yours is a different colour?

Not at this time of year! It is VERY green here in winter.

Snow ... infrequent. It *does* snow, just not often and not much. Closest I've seen was a hailstorm that covered the entire backyard in drifts of little white pellets, and they took a whole day to melt :shocking:

This is about 20km away, but is fairly indicative of the terrain out here. I just like the photo :)

yarcowieroad.jpg

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Oh! Colour me ignorant. I visited Flinders Ranges 27 years ago and that week long sample left a picture something like this in my mind:

the-outback.jpg

Your version of the outback is very nice.

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Here's an ancient local (+/- a couple of hours drive) example:

giantkanuka.jpg

Nice. I used to do a bit of bushwalking on the Lamington plateau in SEQ. I saw an antarctic beech forest in the fog once. Absolutely awe inspiring. Araucarias are also cool (Hoop, Bunya Kauri and Wollemi) A last vestige of gondwana.

post-106-12814461237144_thumb.jpg

Edit: Nice photos all. Makes me want to travel more.

Edited by staringclown

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Oh! Colour me ignorant. I visited Flinders Ranges 27 years ago and that week long sample left a picture something like this in my mind:

Your version of the outback is very nice.

We're too south to be Flinders Ranges - google the Clare Valley, its one of the big SA winemaking regions. We're geographically in the same valley just 70km further north, so we get much the same weather. We use Clare as the reference point for all our forecasts, its about the same but fractionally colder here and a little less rain so its all grain crops here not grapes. And of course this town has pretty much zero tourist attractions, its 'just' a service centre (ie, it has jobs ;) ). There's also a permanent creek running through this town that has been dammed to make a small lake, complete with assorted waterbirds that cross the main street on foot at inconvenient times, which lets local real estate agents advertise houses on Creek St using photos of ducks and described as 'waterfront' :rolleyes:

The drive from here to Adelaide is absolutely gorgeous - fields of grapes, oodles of very postcardy tourist towns, gorgeous English autumn foliage, the works.

It was a lot drier in my old town, more like Broken Hill (which is a few 100km further up the same road my old town is on) but more rain than the Hill ... it may only be 35km from where I live now but we're on one side of a reasonably tall ridge (900m, it has the wind farm in my avatar on top of it) and my old town is on the other side. The ridge blocks TV, mobile and radio reception, and also manages to block rain clouds. The clouds here sit much lower than the top of that ridge - it always used to hurt my brain seeing the wind turbines sitting ABOVE the clouds. Clouds are supposed to be behind large terrain objects, not in front!

The photo in my last post is actually taken from just below the top of the ridge, looking east.

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Another reason I like our exotic trees: they grow exotic toadstools.

The red and white one looks tasty :)

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Yes, Amanita muscaria var. muscaria I believe. Psychoactive in small doses, toxic in large doses...

Not my 'cuppa tea'!

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Planted 15 fruit trees 6 weeks ago and it has never stopped raining since. They're now under water - who would have thought that was ever going to be a problem? Damn the rain!

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"We'll all be rooned," said Hanrahan. :P

Do you have a bit of property, fed up? Or just a packed back-yard? I'm hopeless at keeping the bugs and grubs off fruit trees, but our place used to be an orchard so it came with a couple of apples, one of which grows two or three varieties, and a couple of plums. We planted an orange and a lemon but they grow mostly pith - I don't know if it,s the soil or the climate or the variety.

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"We'll all be rooned," said Hanrahan. tongue.gif

Do you have a bit of property, fed up? Or just a packed back-yard? I'm hopeless at keeping the bugs and grubs off fruit trees, but our place used to be an orchard so it came with a couple of apples, one of which grows two or three varieties, and a couple of plums. We planted an orange and a lemon but they grow mostly pith - I don't know if it,s the soil or the climate or the variety.

I've got a hectare. I planted 2 apples, 2pears, 2 cherries, 2 plums , a plumcot, 2 apricots, fig, nectarine, peach, all in the ground but with soil built up in a single layer of topsoil surrounded by a timber frame. I knew it was potentially a wet area but I'm not sure that my topsoil solution is going to work given the crazy amount of rain we have had. I haven't much practical experience but I have read an enormous amount, so I'm hoping that will help.

I've also got various citrus started in pots within a cafe curtained back porch. Tahitian lime. lemon. kaffir lime, orange and mandarin. I actually hold out more hope for these than the ones planted in the ground.

I think it might be hard to do really well with citrus if they are not protected, but that very much depends on where you are. Having said that, I've seen some good citrus produce off local acreage in Sth Gippsland - so it is possible.

There are various sprays you can apply for bugs etc but I can't advise about the success of them personally because I haven't got to that stage yet.

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We've got a long thin block (15x45m, give or take) and I have this vague notion of planting fruit trees down one edge of the block. The house came with several fruit trees but they were old and very badly neglected, I think they are actually beyond salvaging. The almond tree is massive but rather large bits are prone to falling off it.

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...rather large bits are prone to falling off it.

Wait til you have to get guys with abseiling equipment to come and take the top third off a tree and when it is cut up you have firewood for a decade.

That was a cool day, they trashed the old chicken shed, the neighbours grey water line and various other bits and pieces but avoided hitting the house :)

On the bright side the cockatoos that have been playing in the junction just before the cut do have babies and seem to have got through the ordeal okay. The kookaburras have been checking out the cut bits for bugs and stuff which has created a bit of a turf war over the past few weeks but it seems to have quietened down, I think they might have a new baby too so that might explain their lack of cockatoo taunting though.

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Went for a drive around the snowy mountains today and took some nice picks. Got all four seasons and the place is stunning after all the rain.

The escarpment. Mt Kosz.. is just behind the highest peak in the middle. You can't actually see it.

eajigl.jpg

Cabramurra - The highest 'town' in Australia

jfw2sx.jpg

Thredbo in summer

c8dup.jpg

Leather bottle creek

35buk2t.jpg

All the snow gums seemed to be dead but regrowing. They looked eerie and there was a lot of them. The white appearance of the mountains is mainly these.

2daj6kn.jpg

And of course the Adaminaby giant trout...

bhiww5.jpg

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Yes, Amanita muscaria var. muscaria I believe. Psychoactive in small doses, toxic in large doses...

I read that the host trees have an influence to their psychoactive properties, and that the only really good amanitas are in Siberia/Russian Far-East. Not sure if it is true or not.

They're not to be eaten without first being dried. I recall watching a documentary on the Russian Far-East. The natives would eat them but not touch vodka, the Russian would not eat them but drink vodka. Different strokes.

Edited by Mr Medved

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Went for a drive around the snowy mountains today and took some nice picks. Got all four seasons and the place is stunning after all the rain.

Nice photos. What filter did you use to get the effects on the 'Leather bottle creek' photo?

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