tor

The Mandatory recipe Thread

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How did Ewa's grandmother like the goose? The pictures look pretty good but the blog didn't go to the taste!

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Oh right yeah. I think she (Ewa's Mum, Grandma is long gone) was okay with it. Tasted okay to me. With all the creative scheduling (military precision), lack of a roasting pan with tray (seriously? wtf!!!!), lack of thermometer (again for f*cks sake wtf?) and so on I reckon I could do it better next time.

 

I poured the boiling water over the goose and it tightened it up pretty damn well. The skin was crispy like duck and the meat basically, to me, was close enough to duck. Over the next few days it seemed to slowly move up the hierarchy of "which leftover will I pillage" judging by the altering volumes of left overs.

 

I should probably go and learn to carve a bird though, I think the "I don't know how to approach this in front of mum" slowed people down and I can't carve birds.

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BBQ

 
Charcoal BBQ is the best. Hands down.
 
Following tor's US odyssey has made me jealous that in Aus we pay a premium
for good BBQ if you can find it.
 
Additionally, cooking whilst travelling is difficult. Ms 
Clown and I tend toward self catering accommodation where possible because IMHO there is 
nothing worse than coming across some market with some amazing local produce and not being able to
cook any of it. Plus eating out all of the time is vexatious to the spirit...
 
With this in mind I've been examining options for cooking whilst travelling.
 
Recently we've discovered short back beef ribs. I always assumed they were tough but if 
you can find well marbled ribs they are fantastic!
 
Back to cooking while travelling. There are a couple of issues I can see with BBQ.
 
  • Lugging around loads of ingredients or the expense of chucking stuff out.
  • Access to a BBQ
 
The first can be solved with single purchase marinades. In particular Chimichurri sauce
 
I bought this one and it makes an excellent marinade (As well as a sauce)
 
71-QDbX2QbL._SX522_.jpg
 
Another excellent marinade is Korean Bulgogi (or Kalbi) marinade for beef
 
Available in a bottle and quite cheap.
 
The next problem is the BBQ. There are disposable charcoal grills available reasonably cheaply
 
This one is from BBQs Galore in Aus but Walmart in the US stock similar items. 
The downside is you have to shop at Walmart
 
disposableBBQ-01-lrg.1827.jpg
 
 
Recipes
 
Quality cut of beef from local market
marinade in a bottle
 
OR
Chimichurri
 
bunch of parsley
bunch of coriander
few sprigs of rosemary
few sprigs of thyme
3 cloves of garlic
salt
pepper
2-3 hot chillies
4 Tblsp red wine vinegar 
5 Tblsp oil
 
Blend and marinade for at least 24 hours
 
BBQ over coals (15 minutes with coals at glowing level - no flame) hotter and less if you 
like rare
 
24 hours marinade
 
1/2 Chimichurri 1/2 Kalbi
 
DSC_3955_zpsyz0hap5i.jpg
 
Cooking
 
DSC_3974_zpswzpeylt7.jpg
 
The completed product
 
DSC_3975_zpslvu9aevl.jpg
 
 
Serve with salad or whatever
 
Ms clown put together 
 
Roast pumpkin
Celery 
Sun-dried tomatoes
Capers
roasted flaked almonds
Roquette and spinach leaves
 
Dressing:
pinch allspice
pinch cinnamon
tsp maple syrup
Tbsp olive oil
2 Tbsp Sherry vinegar
 
DSC_3976_zpsd9cr6m8u.jpg
 
Buon appetit!

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BBQ

 
Charcoal BBQ is the best. Hands down.
 
 

 

I own 2 Webber charcoal kettles and would not consider gas!

For the roast vegetables (pumpkin, sweet potatoes, potatoes, onions) I like to marinade them with a mixture of olive oil, balsamic vinegar, salt & oregano.

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I saw a self extinguishing folding BBQ grill on kickstarter or something recently. Looked interesting. Can't find it now though.

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I own 2 Webber charcoal kettles and would not consider gas!

For the roast vegetables (pumpkin, sweet potatoes, potatoes, onions) I like to marinade them with a mixture of olive oil, balsamic vinegar, salt & oregano.

 

It always amazes me that Australians believe they are good at BBQ. What we do is take a frypan outdoors.

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Back on the BBQ theme...

 

Burgers. In some countries they are a staple.

 

The burger I am always trying to replicate is the local milk bar burger.

 

A slightly herbed meat pattie, toasted bun, beetroot, pickles, lettuce, tomato, fried onions, cheese, bacon, tomato sauce (or BBQ if you're feeling a bit exotic)

 

I've been trying for a while and i think i've come up with the optimal recipe. It's a bold claim I know but it's built solely from my own memory so recollections may vary.

 

The important thing for me is burger integrity. A good burger should hold together until the last bite. This means the bun needs to be tough(ish) For this experiment I sourced my buns from my local franchise bakery. They are quite a flat bun and reasonably moisture repellent.

 

recipe:

 

The burger:

 

I used a mix of 60% (600g) premiumTM beef (mainly because my health conscious butcher didn't have hamburger mince) To compensate I used 40% (400g) sausage mince. It helped to bind the pattie as well rather than egg and bread crumbs

 

To this mix add

 

1.5 tsp mixed herbs

1 Tbsp Dijon mustard

2 Tbsp tomato sauce (for sweetness and that extra tang)

1Tbsp worcestershire sauce

1 Tsp salt 

1 Tsp pepper

 

Mix well with your hands - there is no other way 

 

Mold into 4 patties of 250g each

 

Tip: I flattened mine to about 1.5 cm thick and although they seemed quite wide (at least 20 cm) they shrink during cooking so they end up the right size for the bun. (Maybe 15cm across)

 

Fry onions - take them down to as caramelised as you like. I like them reduced almost to dust.

Fry your bacon how you remember it, Do enough for 4 massive burgers - 12 rashers or less if you're stingy or have a family

 

 

If you have good enough bacon and it has rendered enough fat then dip your buns in said fat ready for toasting. (Waste not want not and frankly I didn't claim this was a low cal dish)

 

BBQ the burgers (chargrilled is best) until the desired doneness (personal taste but at least 4 minutes each side as a minimum)

 

 

DSC_3987_zpsu64j6lin.jpg

 

Rest the burgers under foil - You can have a glass of wine here and relax.

 

Cut up all the other ingredients (AKA salad) and grate the cheese (or buy pre-grated)

 

Drain your pickles and beetroot from t'tin

 

Have everything ready to go because we are entering a crucial stage...

 

The assembly:

 

Fire up the oven grill 

 

Grab a base bun and add the pattie, add the bacon layer and the cheese. Place burger under the grill. 

 

DSC_3989_zpsvoblgln6.jpg

 

The egg:

 

This step is optional though for the traditional milk bar burger it isn't 

 

Non stick frypan - heat add egg and break the yolk and spread the yolk through the white. 45 seconds - turn 15 seconds more and egg is done.

 

Add egg to the burger stack.

 

DSC_3995_zpsvb2quoco.jpg

 

Add lettuce, tomato, pickles, beetroot (the order is unimportant)

 

Top with the other side of the toasted bun

 

DSC_4003_zpscxanwrti.jpg

 

 

Perfection is achieved.

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If you put the cheese on the patty in a fry pan with a lid on it the cheese melts, steams and burns just a tiny bit where it drips off the patty. If you can't get american fake yellow cheese I find this to be essential and use jarlsberg.

 

Oh and I just go to the butcher and ask him to mince up 80% lean 20% fat chuck steak coarsely.

 

If you have a strong bun you should experiment with the tomato at the bottom of the stack. I prefer this now.

 

Your bacon fat fried buns are correct and obligatory.

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If you put the cheese on the patty in a fry pan with a lid on it the cheese melts, steams and burns just a tiny bit where it drips off the patty. If you can't get american fake yellow cheese I find this to be essential and use jarlsberg.

 

Oh and I just go to the butcher and ask him to mince up 80% lean 20% fat chuck steak coarsely.

 

If you have a strong bun you should experiment with the tomato at the bottom of the stack. I prefer this now.

 

Your bacon fat fried buns are correct and obligatory.

 

 

I've watched an episode of man vs food tonight and i'm tempted to try making my own pastrami (smoking a corned beef (after boiling) with a BBQ rub) 

 

Your frypan cheese tip is one for the traveler 

 

My buns are strong so I will try the tomato base suggestion  ^_^

 

bed and Ms clown are beckoning.  :ph34r:

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Finally got around to pastrami.

 

Tor has hit New York. At least with the delayed telecast so this recipe is quite apt.

 

My theory was that essentially, pastrami is corned beef smoked rather than boiled. I did have some initial concern about whether the cut of meat that the US use is the same (brisket) but having visited a lot of sites I think what I am using is in fact brisket. In any case most of the sites I visited talk about the "eye" piece that you have a choice between in the corned beef stakes is also a preferred cut for pastrami anyway.

 

So, corned beef is an old school "Australian" dish likely inherited from the Irish. It has fallen out of fashion in recent times, I suspect as a result of intergenerational purging of "old food". Maybe also due some bad cooks that seem to boil corned beef beyond recognition and then serve it with over boiled cabbage and spuds and not even any white sauce. (shame)

 

Good corned beef is worthwhile but even good corned beef probably wouldn't be served at a swanky dinner party. 

 

Pastrami has the advantage of having none of this baggage... 

 

Back to my theory... It was entirely correct!  :yes:

 

So, no more fear of an old cut, which incidentally is reasonably priced. Enough ranting.

 

The recipe:

 

I rinsed the beef just to wash off excess brinage.

 

1 piece of corned beef

2 Tbsp fresh ground black pepper

2 Tbsp smoky (spanish) paprika

2 Tbsp ground coriander

2 Tbsp whole coriander seeds roasted and roughly ground

 

Rub the combined spice rub and apply liberally on to the rinsed beef. Let sit for 24 hours (or not) I did but I don't know if it really affects anything

 

I smoked mine in the Kamado (webber) for about 5 hours with Mequite on about 120 degrees C (covered tightly with foil.

 

Alternatively, you could add a bit of liquid smoke and bake on low for the same time.

 

Cool in the foil. 

 

Consume

 

The results are beyond succulent. It really does give a new purpose to this archaic cut. 

 

DSC_4010_zps4m1dczbs.jpg

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Had another go at bacon.

I feel this attempt was far more successful. It looks like and tastes like bacon.

I did a couple of things differently. This time I used Prague powder #1. (Sodium nitrite) in my curing mix. I bought it online. I didn't use it last time but you really should as it prevents botulinum poisoning. Bacon is less risky as you cook it further before eating but sausages are a definite no-no without it.

I used the maple bacon recipe

http://amazingribs.com/recipes/porknography/making_bacon_from_scratch.html

Last attempt I wet brined. This time I used the dry curing method in gallon bags in the fridge. Much more economical as far les salt was used.

The other major change was a cold smoking rig of my own design. Although I didn't actually cold smoke due to botulinum risk outlined on the above link. I was able to maintain a constant 107 degrees Celsius (which is enough to kill the dreaded lergy)

I bought a cheap smoker, a bit of heat proof flexiduct. Aluminium tube. And regulate the temp using tin foil and a towel. It's not pretty but it did the job. The towel was hosed however.

Smoked for 2 hours at 107ish. Canberra was 6 degrees this morning so the insulation around the pipe was necessary to get the temp right. I shortened the pipe for the same reason. Also the thermometer on the cheap smoker was registering 107 but I suspect the internal temp was higher. I'll try 80 next time.

Here's my rig...

image_zpst0ordzxq.jpeg

Other improvements were the purchase of a proper slicer (a la tor) and a vacuum packing device.

The results were quite pleasing... Just like a bought one.

image_zpsljwhipti.jpeg

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I have no doubt that you all have been waiting for this moment:  :rolleyes:

 

The Colonel’s original chicken recipe found in scrapbook

 

 

Personally, I can't even remember the last time I ate such sh!t.

I suspect the secret is not in the herbs and spices but rather the soaking in milk.

 

KFC did a great marketing con in removing the fried from the name. KFC is not the same as the Kentucky Fried Chicken I had as a kid. 

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