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The Mandatory recipe Thread

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I've made smoked chicken risotto with those smoked chicken breasts you can buy in the shops. They have tough "skin" even though they're skinless so I wasn't that enamoured by the result.

Those things are awful! I used to occasionally buy them for sandwiches but now you'd have to pay me to eat them. Not even remotely similar. I think they might be quite hot smoked.

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Those things are awful! I used to occasionally buy them for sandwiches but now you'd have to pay me to eat them. Not even remotely similar. I think they might be quite hot smoked.

I don't know how they actually get them that tough. You might be right about the hot smoking. Bloody horrible.

Smoked my bacon and the good news is it worked! It tastes and looks like bacon. It's actually pretty good bacon. :) Had some for breakfast yesterday.

It came out like black forest/gypsy bacon.

The brine was clear as a bell (I replaced the initial 6.4% brine with a 60 degree (625g salt/1.25 gallons water) on day two) all of the blood and everything gone. Left for a further 6 days. 7 days total. Rinsed and soaked the meat for 2 hours. This is important. Otherwise you get very salty meat.

Smoked at 130 for 1.5 hours with a final 45 minute burst at 150. This is the magic number for killing off botchalism.

The next time I will definitely try with nitrites and save myself sweating over whether I will poison myself. You get the pinker colour using nitrites as well.

Voila! 3 kg home smoked.

DSC_0933_zpsaa9df3c3.jpg

DSC_0930_zps59e17bcb.jpg

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Lord of Pork Indeed!

hmmm now you have tempted me to follow in the footsteps. It would be an excellent argument for why I need a much better meat slicer...

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Lord of Pork Indeed!

hmmm now you have tempted me to follow in the footsteps. It would be an excellent argument for why I need a much better meat slicer...

I was thinking about your meat slicer and how I now need one. I have a blister. :o I thought yours was pretty good? Ms Clown says they had them at Aldi for <100 bucks but I _want the industrial model. :)

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I was thinking about your meat slicer and how I now need one. I have a blister. ohmy.gif I thought yours was pretty good? Ms Clown says they had them at Aldi for <100 bucks but I _want the industrial model. smile.gif

you do not want the aldi slicer. trust me. it's completely useless.

let me know how the nitrates go - where did you order them from? i was going to just ask a butcher to sell me some of theirs but i am too shy...

i've been wanting to do my own baconing for a while but, like you, botulism seemed to me like less fun that it sounded. of course nitrates kill you too, but you can't have everything.

i wonder if using belly with skin on will make any real difference (costco is skin off, yeah?)... oh my, but do i want some really good bacon now.

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you do not want the aldi slicer. trust me. it's completely useless.

let me know how the nitrates go - where did you order them from? i was going to just ask a butcher to sell me some of theirs but i am too shy...

i've been wanting to do my own baconing for a while but, like you, botulism seemed to me like less fun that it sounded. of course nitrates kill you too, but you can't have everything.

i wonder if using belly with skin on will make any real difference (costco is skin off, yeah?)... oh my, but do i want some really good bacon now.

I suspected as much about the Aldi slicer. Their coffee machine (with the pods) is OK and that seems to have sucked Ms clown in. ^_^

I have ordered 1kg #1 prague powder (6.25% nitrite) from redbacktrading. I got the link from this SBS blog.

I spent a week worrying about whether it would turn out so I think it's worth tracking down. $24.60 (10 bucks for the salt and 12.60 for P&H) You only need a small amount for each cure so it should last a while. The bacon forums make a particular point of dismissing the nitrite health issues. You'll see as soon as you search. Meh I choose to believe.

All of the forum sites say remove the skin and make crackling with it. It doesn't help the baconation. The costco whole belly is skinless and TBH I was after a replica of streaky and I think it's pretty close.

I'm going to try maple bacon with the nitrites next time. Hmmm. Maple... :D

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I suspected as much about the Aldi slicer. Their coffee machine (with the pods) is OK and that seems to have sucked Ms clown in. happy.gif

I have ordered 1kg #1 prague powder (6.25% nitrite) from redbacktrading. I got the link from this SBS blog.

I spent a week worrying about whether it would turn out so I think it's worth tracking down. $24.60 (10 bucks for the salt and 12.60 for P&H) You only need a small amount for each cure so it should last a while. The bacon forums make a particular point of dismissing the nitrite health issues. You'll see as soon as you search. Meh I choose to believe.

All of the forum sites say remove the skin and make crackling with it. It doesn't help the baconation. The costco whole belly is skinless and TBH I was after a replica of streaky and I think it's pretty close.

I'm going to try maple bacon with the nitrites next time. Hmmm. Maple... biggrin.gif

mmmm maple..... that does sound good.

nitrates - well it can't be any worse than the mass produced stuff, right? and if i say it's potentially dangerous i won't have to share it with anyone else :P.

let me know how it goes :)

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I was thinking about your meat slicer and how I now need one. I have a blister. :o/> I thought yours was pretty good? Ms Clown says they had them at Aldi for <100 bucks but I _want the industrial model. :)/>

Mine was good compared to other domestic ones I have used but:

The blade rusts at the drop of a hat

The exit of sliced meat is not that accurate and ends up with a pretty hard cleanup job

The action is not _really_ smooth and accurate so slices are not perfect

All of which made me less likely to use it and made some things like paper thin slices of meat out of the question. I want one of those terrifying ones with the smooth as a very smooth thing action that you get in a good deli. Expensive though and sort of kind of hard to justify. But I am working on justifications :)

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Bigos.

Traditional Polish peasant food thing. Not remotely related to choucroute garnie in any way shape or form. Plus the French are a smelly inferior race.

New Zealanders are a nice race though and plus have long held the opinion that an electric frypan is an essential element in any kitchen worthy of the name.

I am a proud (and perceptive) New Zealand man.

Bigos Nowa Zelandia moda

Go to deli. Buy 2 of any sausage that has Polish or Smoked in the name and looks pretty firm. Stupid soft yellow German frankfurters which are smoked (and stupid) should be excluded (unless you like them and then you will get all of them because Polish Ladies don't like them). I had 6 good sausages (2 each of juniper, smoked and hunter) and 2 stupid soft yellow German ones.

Grab a couple of pre cooked duck breasts, the ones with the fat and juice still in the there.

And some nice bacon, 4 rashers or 6. Nice smoked bacon.

Put electric frypan on a meeeellion degrees. Snigger a little, you're allowed to. Do not put little finger to mouth! Kiwis are a subtle race.

Chop bacon into little wee bits. Fry it til fat starts rendering out well.

Drop temperature because that thing is getting smoky.

Work out how to turn off smoke alarm.

Chop duck boobs into bite size pieces and scrape all the jelly and fat in as well. Giggle a little. heh, boobs.

Chop sausages into "double bite" size pieces, maybe 3 inches. Dump them into bacon and fat.

Add a tin of edgells sauerkraut including liquid.

Black Pepper it up a tad.

Simmer on 2 for an hour or so. It will do that cool "Not hot enough, Go To FULL!, oh that was overkill, go to NOTHING" thing which makes electric frypans so much fun. Moderation is for the mediocre!

Add some water.

Get bored.

Add some fresh cabbage.

Go get a drink or two until the cabbage is cooked like the way grandma would have approved of.

Stir occasionally, add water when it looks like it is needed. Basically any time you get a drink give it a drink.

Add another tin of sauerkraut just because it is kind of looking pretty meat heavy in there.

Bowl, Fork, Eat, Culture - 2 at once even! Leftovers in fridge for 3 days and it is even better.

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Bigos.

Traditional Polish peasant food thing. Not remotely related to choucroute garnie in any way shape or form. Plus the French are a smelly inferior race.

New Zealanders are a nice race though and plus have long held the opinion that an electric frypan is an essential element in any kitchen worthy of the name.

I am a proud (and perceptive) New Zealand man.

Bigos Nowa Zelandia moda

Go to deli. Buy 2 of any sausage that has Polish or Smoked in the name and looks pretty firm. Stupid soft yellow German frankfurters which are smoked (and stupid) should be excluded (unless you like them and then you will get all of them because Polish Ladies don't like them). I had 6 good sausages (2 each of juniper, smoked and hunter) and 2 stupid soft yellow German ones.

Grab a couple of pre cooked duck breasts, the ones with the fat and juice still in the there.

And some nice bacon, 4 rashers or 6. Nice smoked bacon.

Put electric frypan on a meeeellion degrees. Snigger a little, you're allowed to. Do not put little finger to mouth! Kiwis are a subtle race.

Chop bacon into little wee bits. Fry it til fat starts rendering out well.

Drop temperature because that thing is getting smoky.

Work out how to turn off smoke alarm.

Chop duck boobs into bite size pieces and scrape all the jelly and fat in as well. Giggle a little. heh, boobs.

Chop sausages into "double bite" size pieces, maybe 3 inches. Dump them into bacon and fat.

Add a tin of edgells sauerkraut including liquid.

Black Pepper it up a tad.

Simmer on 2 for an hour or so. It will do that cool "Not hot enough, Go To FULL!, oh that was overkill, go to NOTHING" thing which makes electric frypans so much fun. Moderation is for the mediocre!

Add some water.

Get bored.

Add some fresh cabbage.

Go get a drink or two until the cabbage is cooked like the way grandma would have approved of.

Stir occasionally, add water when it looks like it is needed. Basically any time you get a drink give it a drink.

Add another tin of sauerkraut just because it is kind of looking pretty meat heavy in there.

Bowl, Fork, Eat, Culture - 2 at once even! Leftovers in fridge for 3 days and it is even better.

Excellent! I have a smoked duck boob and I've been struggling with what to do with it. Next weekend is polish sausage weekend at the white eagle club. Sorted.

A quick question for a polish lady. I bought a jar of Winiary Barszcz Czerwony (instant) - Doskonaly smak i aromat. Any recipes? I have no idea what to do with it. :huh:

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A quick question for a polish lady. I bought a jar of Winiary Barszcz Czerwony (instant) - Doskonaly smak i aromat. Any recipes? I have no idea what to do with it. ???/>

This one?

http://wygodny-market.pl/upload/images/products/big/Winiary_barszcz_czerwony_instant_150g_817.jpg

What does it say on the back? It is just instant borscht which you add water to, probably about 2 teaspoons to 250ml and then taste.

You can then put noodles or pierogi or whatever into it. At christmas we had it with uszka (which are _not_ pierogi, they are "ears") that had mushrooms in them. I think they were my favourite dish that night. They will probably be for sale at the Polish meeting thing.

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This one?

http://wygodny-market.pl/upload/images/products/big/Winiary_barszcz_czerwony_instant_150g_817.jpg

What does it say on the back? It is just instant borscht which you add water to, probably about 2 teaspoons to 250ml and then taste.

You can then put noodles or pierogi or whatever into it. At christmas we had it with uszka (which are _not_ pierogi, they are "ears") that had mushrooms in them. I think they were my favourite dish that night. They will probably be for sale at the Polish meeting thing.

Yep that is the stuff I bought. :)

On the back is a string of unending consonants with little vowelage. Thank you polish lady!

I have the germ of an idea that I will make some dumpling pastry from the stock itself (hopefully they will turn out purple) Maybe double down on the borsht theme and bathe them in the soup! :) Modern polish?

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The limitations of smoker/roasters.

Bought a charcoal grill (weber) small thing today. Instead of the full smoker this fills a niche recently identified where you want really hot grilling but don't need the full egg. Rather you want charcoal grill with high temps close to the meat. This is more useful for satay and street vendor food (Asia)

The charcoal is within centimetres of the meat.

Satay_zps0e36c95a.jpg

$109 from BBQ galore.

It was a first attempt but it has worked a treat. It works as a smoker as well or so the man told me. Did satays. Used this recipe.

Chicken Satay Recipe

Ingredients:

4 chicken legs and thighs (preferred) or 4 chicken breasts (boneless and skinless)

Spice Paste:

1 teaspoon coriander powder

2 stalks lemongrass, white parts only

6 shallots (peeled)

2 cloves garlic (peeled)

4 tablespoons cooking oil

1 teaspoon chili powder

2 teaspoons turmeric powder (kunyit)

4 teaspoons of kecap manis (Indonesian sweet soy sauce)

1 teaspoon oyster sauce

Bamboo skewers (soaked in water for 2 hours to avoid burning)

1 cucumber (skin peeled and cut into small pieces)

1 small onion (quartered)

Method:

Cut the chicken meat into small cubes. Grind the Spice Paste in a food processor. Add in a little water if needed. Marinate the chicken pieces with the spice paste for 10-12 hours. Thread the meat onto the bamboo skewers and grill for 2-3 minutes on each side. Serve hot with the fresh cucumber pieces and onions.

I like Malay. Thai/vietnamese/ would work equally well I suspect. The flavour is right.

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The limitations of smoker/roasters.

Bought a charcoal grill (weber) small thing today. Instead of the full smoker this fills a niche recently identified where you want really hot grilling but don't need the full egg. Rather you want charcoal grill with high temps close to the meat. This is more useful for satay and street vendor food (Asia)

The charcoal is within centimetres of the meat.

Satay_zps0e36c95a.jpg

$109 from BBQ galore.

It was a first attempt but it has worked a treat. It works as a smoker as well or so the man told me. Did satays. Used this recipe.

I like Malay. Thai/vietnamese/ would work equally well I suspect. The flavour is right.

nice - i have my eye on one of those but it will take some convincing... i have a new weber gas grill for everyday bbqing, the gas pizza oven... justification for the small grill is weak but if i am hoping i can justify it by using the "authentic japanese bbq" argument. either that or i will just buy it when she's home visiting the rellies and tell her i got it cheap on sale... i suspect that will be the way to go.

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nice - i have my eye on one of those but it will take some convincing... i have a new weber gas grill for everyday bbqing, the gas pizza oven... justification for the small grill is weak but if i am hoping i can justify it by using the "authentic japanese bbq" argument. either that or i will just buy it when she's home visiting the rellies and tell her i got it cheap on sale... i suspect that will be the way to go.

They actually had a cast iron hibachi for $100 at the shop. I was tempted... but it was a bit heavy.

Here's a couple more selling points for Ms urchin.

  • It folds up neatly and securely so can be taken camping and on picnics. Picture yourself sending mouth watering aromas across the park to the envy of all others. :)
  • In Canberra it can double as a brazier.

They also have throw away charcoal grills for $6. You could try one of these to prove the superior flavour.

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First, lessons from science: I tried doing the smoked rice thing with the chicken the other day. I used jasmine rice. Then I made risotto with it. Don't do this unless you like semi savoury rice pudding.

Next more fun thing. I have a couple of those gas powered burners from when I redid the kitchen. I grabbed one of the "multi roast" dishes from the local Korean supermarket and made a half arsed version of Korean barbecue meat. I am pretty sure even Anders would find this easy enough:

Meat, sliced thing (I used an eye fillet I had in the freezer and let it almost thaw as partially frozen makes slicing thin easier, meat with more fat is probably better though).

Some ginger, garlic, honey, sesame oil and soy marinade and into the fridge (maybe a tablespoon of each and two of soy) for an hour.

Heat up the pan, fry the meat without oil or anything, eat it as it comes off the pan.

Fun dinner on the balcony.

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Lazy Man Dinners (American edition)

 

I figure a lazy man dinner means you cook once seriously for the week then the rest of the week is easy leftovers which morph into completely different meals with as little waste as possible.

 

I have probably expounded on the virtues of cooking a decent size rump whole at low temperatures for a long time before. I now have a new addition to the options for the left overs.

 

Americans like these sloppy rolls with meat on them they call a french dip. We can use left over slow and very rare roast beef for them. When you have finished having your roast dinner either freeze the left over slices or slice some more off into slices as thin as you can make and freeze them. Freeze the beef in roughly the serving size you need as they won't be thawed when used. Trim the cap fat though.

 

If you have way too much juices for the gravy instead of making tons and throw it away just pour it into a bowl and when freezing some meat for the rolls pour it evenly amongst all the freezer bags (I often have too much juice for gravy as I tend to roast the beef over water or red wine with garlic and onions in it)

 

On the night of the lazy man dinner which impresses ladies:

 

Grab some frozen rolls from the freezer, let them thaw. Ideally do this before going to work or something if you go to work. Most rolls seem to take about half an hour so you might get away with it if you remember when you get home from work (microwave thawing them is bloody awful., don't do this)

 

Then just boil up a bit of stock (over the top of some fried onions, carrots and celery leaves if possible, makes it noticeably better, if you have a habit of doing celery and carrots with a blue cheese dip on friday with wings you will have these already cut up and in the fridge unless some trollop scarfed them all over the weekend) and dump a serving size of frozen beef in there. Within a few minutes the beef will separate (tongs help a bit for speeding up the process) and then give it a bit of a wiggle so all pieces are uniformly warm (you're not aiming to cook the bejesus out of it but cooked well is okay as it is thin).

 

Whip the slices of beef to a bowl and turn the heat to million for the pot of stock so it reduces down quite quickly. Pour some stock into the bowl of beef to keep it warm.

 

When the stock is getting dark and almost burned in appearance slice the rolls and dip the sliced face into the stock. Rapidly (because these rolls are already losing structural integrity) chuck the beef on the roll and whatever garnishes you like. The beef should be ludicrously vast in quantity. At least half an inch depth of beef and an inch is better. Eat quickly.

 

Garnishes we like:

 

Basic lazy man: Horseradish

Weird Polish thing: Good gherkins, lettuce and some of the floaty onions and carrot

Phasing out to Chicago: Gardineria (I like this a lot, the vinegar really cuts through the fatty stock)

Cheesy: Super thin slices of cheese (I use jarlsberg) that will melt at least a little. Cheddar won't make the grade

 

I have also put jalapenos in all of those varieties just cause jalapenos are fun.

 

Garnishes one person likes:

Garbage: Put every salad vegetable you can find on there. These are impossible to eat and make you look silly. It is good that person has other redeeming features.

 

Serve the rolls with a bowl of the reduced stock on the side for further dipping in case the rolls are not actually collapsing from the juice. Plus napkins.

 

All in all once you have the hang of it the time required is not more than maybe ten minutes to go from freezer to plate.

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I admit it. I'm the frog.  :beer:

 

What I am curious about Anders is how you came across the link. Seems a bit gourmet for you.  :)

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Lazy Man Dinners (American edition)

 

I figure a lazy man dinner means you cook once seriously for the week then the rest of the week is easy leftovers which morph into completely different meals with as little waste as possible.

 

I have probably expounded on the virtues of cooking a decent size rump whole at low temperatures for a long time before. I now have a new addition to the options for the left overs.

 

Americans like these sloppy rolls with meat on them they call a french dip. We can use left over slow and very rare roast beef for them. When you have finished having your roast dinner either freeze the left over slices or slice some more off into slices as thin as you can make and freeze them. Freeze the beef in roughly the serving size you need as they won't be thawed when used. Trim the cap fat though.

 

If you have way too much juices for the gravy instead of making tons and throw it away just pour it into a bowl and when freezing some meat for the rolls pour it evenly amongst all the freezer bags (I often have too much juice for gravy as I tend to roast the beef over water or red wine with garlic and onions in it)

 

On the night of the lazy man dinner which impresses ladies:

 

Grab some frozen rolls from the freezer, let them thaw. Ideally do this before going to work or something if you go to work. Most rolls seem to take about half an hour so you might get away with it if you remember when you get home from work (microwave thawing them is bloody awful., don't do this)

 

Then just boil up a bit of stock (over the top of some fried onions, carrots and celery leaves if possible, makes it noticeably better, if you have a habit of doing celery and carrots with a blue cheese dip on friday with wings you will have these already cut up and in the fridge unless some trollop scarfed them all over the weekend) and dump a serving size of frozen beef in there. Within a few minutes the beef will separate (tongs help a bit for speeding up the process) and then give it a bit of a wiggle so all pieces are uniformly warm (you're not aiming to cook the bejesus out of it but cooked well is okay as it is thin).

 

Whip the slices of beef to a bowl and turn the heat to million for the pot of stock so it reduces down quite quickly. Pour some stock into the bowl of beef to keep it warm.

 

When the stock is getting dark and almost burned in appearance slice the rolls and dip the sliced face into the stock. Rapidly (because these rolls are already losing structural integrity) chuck the beef on the roll and whatever garnishes you like. The beef should be ludicrously vast in quantity. At least half an inch depth of beef and an inch is better. Eat quickly.

 

Garnishes we like:

 

Basic lazy man: Horseradish

Weird Polish thing: Good gherkins, lettuce and some of the floaty onions and carrot

Phasing out to Chicago: Gardineria (I like this a lot, the vinegar really cuts through the fatty stock)

Cheesy: Super thin slices of cheese (I use jarlsberg) that will melt at least a little. Cheddar won't make the grade

 

I have also put jalapenos in all of those varieties just cause jalapenos are fun.

 

Garnishes one person likes:

Garbage: Put every salad vegetable you can find on there. These are impossible to eat and make you look silly. It is good that person has other redeeming features.

 

Serve the rolls with a bowl of the reduced stock on the side for further dipping in case the rolls are not actually collapsing from the juice. Plus napkins.

 

All in all once you have the hang of it the time required is not more than maybe ten minutes to go from freezer to plate.

 

I have a freezer full of pulled pork serves. It does make an excellent nacho/con carne/generalised Mexican meat sauce and even has that adobe smokiness. I inevitably leave it too long in the freezer as I get bored with eating the same meal more than once a month. Finally, it ends up like pulling mammoth meat from the permafrost and I don't enjoy it as much as I should.

 

I'm trying to cook smaller serves rather than larger at the moment. Ms clown is less carnivorous than is required for the larger cuts and I can't do all the heavy lifting on my own.

 

Did some fair pizzas last night in the kamado (250 degrees+) but am eating the same pizzas for lunch and again for dinner. Damn the law of diminishing returns.

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I admit it. I'm the frog.  :beer:

 

What I am curious about Anders is how you came across the link. Seems a bit gourmet for you.  :)

 

Yeah, he is a bit too advanced for me.

 

But, there is no better way to learn a skill than to watch a master carefully. I reckon the Greg's Kitchen bloke is awesome!

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We made pierogi that are not pierogi tonight. It has been stipulated that any that fail are my fault. As some are expected to fail I have been informed I am allowed to cook the goose for christmas. I have never cooked a goose. Any advice welcome.

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I've done duck a few times which is similar to goose

 
Two schools of thought. Serving rare breast meat (which is removed during cooking)
versus serving the goose whole (looks pretty) The leg meat will take a lot longer than
the breast but there are ways around this. 
 
I would find out what the audience is expecting so as not to disappoint.
 
The way that Maggie Beer gets around the disparate cooking times are by using an oven bag.
Except on very young geese. < 12 weeks old. Usually around 2 hours. 
 
I'm not sure what technology you have access to. Meat thermometer in the thickest part 
of the thigh registering 75-80C is cooked. No thermometer then checked juices run clear
with skewer in the same thigh. Also the meat just coming away from the bone on the 
drumstick is a good indicator.
 

For a young goose, cook for 45 minutes, then turn the bird over and cook for another 45 minutes or until the legs come away easily from the bone (with an older goose it could take twice as long for this to occur). For an older goose, turn the oven down to 120C after the first 45 minutes and cook for another 2 hours 15 minutes.
 
When cooked, open the oven bag and increase the temperature to 210C, then return the goose to the oven to brown the breast skin for 10 minutes.
 

 

 

I would probably avoid actual stuffing as it complicates the cooking and opt for fresh 
herbs (sage, thyme, parsley), half a lemon and some garlic in the cavity.
 
Save the juices and make gravy. Save the fat and make roast spuds. Goose fat is the best
for this. 
 
The only other tips woud be prick the skin to release maximum fat and get crispy skin. Skin not the meat. Too deep and the bird will dry out.
Rub lemon juice and season well with salt to help get the colour. Rest well (1/2 hour)
 
If you opt for pink breast then cut them out after about 45 mins. Keep cooking the rest 
until they satisfy the above criteria. Pan fry the breast skin down to get colour before 
serving.
 
Good luck.  :)
 
Edit: Forgot to add if you can't get oven bags then you'll need to baste every 20 minutes with the fat/juices to keep the meat moist. If you use a bag you may need to give a 10 minute burst in a hot oven to get the colour on the bird.

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Yeah I was thinking "it's just a big duck". Read a bunch of web sites and the synthesised recipe is:

 

Thaw goose for two days in the outer room (it is just under 3 degrees)

Brine for 12 hours (this bit I am still only seeing on american sites so far (but then brining is an american thing) so I am a bit iffy on it, makes a world of difference to chicken though, never tried with duck, if you have yell at me if it was awful)

Prick skin like for a duck

Stuff with onion & apple roughly chopped

truss it

Lots of respectable looking people (Julia Childs, some English guy considered Lord of The Fowl) then steam the goose for an hour or so (in the oven covered)

Let it rest uncovered for a day in the outer room (I know this definitely makes crispy skin easy but the main reason is that during this period all the ovens will be in use for the real christmas food)

Roast breast side down til it is starting to come up to temp (this will be an on the fly guesstimate with 145 as the target from memory for pinky meat)

Flip it and roast breast side up for the final temp, if the legs and breast are way out of whack then separate the breast at this point

Basting every 20 minutes or so during this last roast.

 

The only reason for the goose is that Ewa's grandmother had geese so her mum always had goose at christmas until communism kicked in. Since then she has never been able to afford it but now she can and she wants it again.

 

But, and this sucks for me, it is a nostalgic thing so she can't remember if it was pink or if it was with crispy skin. Of course this could work in my favour as even the worst goose will bring back the memories. This is why I am thinking that if I can keep it as one big bird to serve it will "taste" better for her even if it is not perfect.

 

Poles don't go for the english roast vegetables apparently so I won't be doing that probably although Ewa says they have something similar (sounds more like pan fried tatties to me) and people will like it so I might roast up some tatties in the goose fat the next day. I might make a sneaky gravy even if it just for myself to go with them.

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With all the nostalgia for Australia going on in our house, the below recipe from the genius Greg's Kitchen is brilliant!

 

 

If there was a Nobel Prize for cooking then this guy would win it several years in a row, in my opinion!

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