tor

The Mandatory recipe Thread

1013 posts in this topic

Mmm! Cow's tongue is delicious. Never tried pigs tongue - how do you cook it?

Unfortunately cow's tongue has become both hard to find and over priced, at least in my part of the world. If you can get a smoked cow's tongue, I cook it much as you would corned beef, for quite a long time - say two hours, at a low simmer, in water lightly seasoned with vinegar, pepper, a little brown sugar, elderly carrots, celery tops etc. Cool it but don't let it get cold. Throw out the vegetable seasonings as they have usually turned to mush. The broth can be used for soup if you feel like it - a variation on pea and ham works well as it is strongly flavoured. It would probably do a great job as a base for your lentil soup.

The trick with tongue is peeling it before it gets cold - stay with me here!, it is less gross than it sounds and the tongue is genuinely really tasty. Gently peel off the skin while it is tepid, from the thick end of the tongue to the thin. Discard the skin, it is bristly (remember being licked by a cow as a kid? - That's why!). What remains is a smooth chunk of rich and tasty meat, best chilled and sliced very finely for sandwiches, or eaten shredded (warm) with your choice of starch.

Fantastic fuel in winter, but sadly totally inappropriate for summer, IMO.

I have an old "Tongue press". Basically a cast aluminium deep meatloaf shaped thing with a plate you attach at the top and can be screwed down. I use it for rillettes at the moment. I presume it is for squeezing out liquid (or something) Anyone got any ideas why tongue needs pressing?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have an old "Tongue press". Basically a cast aluminium deep meatloaf shaped thing with a plate you attach at the top and can be screwed down. I use it for rillettes at the moment. I presume it is for squeezing out liquid (or something) Anyone got any ideas why tongue needs pressing?

Yes, the old recipes (Victorian onwards) suggest you need to press your tongue.

My guess is that this is because, unpressed, tongue is a very 'organically' shaped piece of meat. It LOOKS like someone's tongue. This might tend to put the delicate off their feed. Also, it makes it hard(ish) to carve, with a large mass of meat at the root end (that's what it is called) and a neat compact narrow strip of meat at the tip of the tongue.

If you kind of double the cooked tongue over and press it, you get a neater end result which is easier to carve and less taxing to the delicate sensibilities. Tongue is very dense, I doubt that you would have a lot of liquid - I think it is all about the shape of the end result. Tongue has a lot of gelatine and sets quite firmly when chilled.

BTW - in contrast, the old Aussie cookbooks suggest weighting it down with a clean brick or stone.

I ate rillettes in France and was, ahem, a little overwhelmed by the amount of fat they included. I don't think you could get away with that here! I mean, I like duck fat as much (or more) as the next person, but - !

People forget it was all about the preservation of the food. Rillettes, properly prepared, will keep the meat in good condition for months and months, and the only substantial fat is the protective layer on top. It wasn't all about the swank factor!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, the old recipes (Victorian onwards) suggest you need to press your tongue.

My guess is that this is because, unpressed, tongue is a very 'organically' shaped piece of meat. It LOOKS like someone's tongue. This might tend to put the delicate off their feed. Also, it makes it hard(ish) to carve, with a large mass of meat at the root end (that's what it is called) and a neat compact narrow strip of meat at the tip of the tongue.

If you kind of double the cooked tongue over and press it, you get a neater end result which is easier to carve and less taxing to the delicate sensibilities. Tongue is very dense, I doubt that you would have a lot of liquid - I think it is all about the shape of the end result. Tongue has a lot of gelatine and sets quite firmly when chilled.

BTW - in contrast, the old Aussie cookbooks suggest weighting it down with a clean brick or stone.

That makes sense. It's almost Blumenthalian in that is largely about aesthetics. I seem to remember a thing called "brawn" from my youth. It had bits of animal some of which I think may have been tongue, god knows what the other bits were. But it tasted delicious! It has put me in mind of making something in aspic. Perhaps using veal stock rather than clear aspic. Then I wondered whether food in aspic was also a preserving technique? Pork pies etc (poured in at the end to seal the meat?)

I ate rillettes in France and was, ahem, a little overwhelmed by the amount of fat they included. I don't think you could get away with that here! I mean, I like duck fat as much (or more) as the next person, but - !

People forget it was all about the preservation of the food. Rillettes, properly prepared, will keep the meat in good condition for months and months, and the only substantial fat is the protective layer on top. It wasn't all about the swank factor!

Not a regular menu item :blush: and usually for a large group. Picnics etc served with cornichons (cuts through the fat), water cress and bread. I've done pork twice and duck once. Lots of nutmeg, bay leaves thyme and juniper berry. There is a guy (or there used to be circa 2003) just off Lygon st down an alley way next door to Jimmy Watsons wine bar that sold the best charcuterie in Melbourne. His duck confit made for a pretty good duck rillettes. ^_^

Edited by staringclown

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That makes sense. It's almost Blumenthalian in that is largely about aesthetics. I seem to remember a thing called "brawn" from my youth. It had bits of animal some of which I think may have been tongue, god knows what the other bits were. But it tasted delicious! It has put me in mind of making something in aspic. Perhaps using veal stock rather than clear aspic. Then I wondered whether food in aspic was also a preserving technique? Pork pies etc (poured in at the end to seal the meat?)

Not a regular menu item :blush: and usually for a large group. Picnics etc served with cornichons (cuts through the fat), water cress and bread. I've done pork twice and duck once. Lots of nutmeg, bay leaves thyme and juniper berry. There is a guy (or there used to be circa 2003) just off Lygon st down an alley way next door to Jimmy Watsons wine bar that sold the best charcuterie in Melbourne. His duck confit made for a pretty good duck rillettes. ^_^

People are gonna start getting the wrong idea about my diet...

Brawn is also known as head cheese... yep, it's made out of a boiled pigs head.

Some of my fondest memories as a kid are of watching the pigs head come home, and then of picking the meat off the bones once it was cooked up. The aspic is the broth from the boiled head - all the cartilage and bone in the head makes the broth so sticky with gelatine it almost glues your lips together.

And it was fun playing with the jawbone with the teeth still in place... (Strange, I don't remember the tongue, but it must have been there - presumably some of the pink bits in the brawn were actually pig's tongue!)

Aaaanyway, the meat gets picked off the bones and chopped in to attractive pieces, a bit of cooked carrot, pickled gherkin or chopped parsley (depending on your ethnic background - this dish is popular in Germany, France and Britain, as well as various other places) added, and the strained cooking broth is poured over the whole lot.

My mother would make intricate patterns of carrot and gherkin on the bottom of the bowl so that when the set brawn was turned out on a platter, the colourful pattern would be revealed. And it tastes good, too, with fresh bread and a bit of mustard.

Many years later we lived in North Carlton for a bunch of years at the end of the 90's. Great area for good eats. Rathdowne village, Smith St, North Fitzroy. Sigh.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Many years later we lived in North Carlton for a bunch of years at the end of the 90's. Great area for good eats. Rathdowne village, Smith St, North Fitzroy. Sigh.

Hah! I was in Carlton from 93 - 2000. If you ever visited the Dan O'Connell I may know you. :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Les haricots sur pain grillé

1) Open a can of beans

2) Pour over toast

Bon Appétit! :)

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

staringclown asked me to contribute so here goes:

Don't know what to call it just know how to cook it:

Splodge of olive oil in frypan.

Onion, chop it. Fry.

Garlic, crush it, stomp on it, chop it, let the flavour ooze. Fry.

Lump of pig, aka speck. Remove rind (and fat). Chop. Fry.

(If you're lazy like me you'll just buy diced bacon. Use the speck and you'll feel like you are on Jamie Oliver's cooking show.)

Packet of frozen broad beans (best results if you remove beans from packet). Fry.

Notice the recurring theme there?

Cook the lot until beans are heated through.

Sprinkle with chopped pistachios.

WARNING - NOT TO BE DIGESTED IN CONFINED SPACES

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

New to the site, will have a try at posting on a less volatile thread.

Warning : not for Vegetarians. Will post up a more suitable post later.

Something simple and easy, that is rich in taste and soft in texture.

Lamb Shanks slowly cooked.

Get some lamb shanks, remove as much fat as possible or buy frenched shanks.

Cut up 1-2 brown onions and as much garlic as you or your partner the next morning can handle.

Make up some vegetable stock - about 250mm.

Obtain some chop tin tomatoes or fresh if available.

Heat oven to about 120-150 degrees

Brown shanks in pot on high heat with some olive oil. Once brown turn off heat and pour in stock, chopped tomatoes, stock with a little salt and a teaspoon of brown sugar. Add in a sprig or two of rosemary and a 1/3rd of a bottle of red wine.

The shanks should be covered in 2/3rds liquid.

Place in oven for at least three hours (the more the better on lower heat, six hours and the lamb will melt in your mouth) with lid on pot. Check every hour and rotate shanks.

After several hours remove shanks and debone. Skim any fat of liquid and blend, further reduce liquid to be used as a sauce.

Cook up what ever vegies you like. Personally just some mash is enough for me and a glass of Cab Sav.

Can replace the red wine with Guiness, works a treat. But add more Guiness and less stock.

Cheers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

New to the site, will have a try at posting on a less volatile thread.

I think you'll find it gets pretty brutal sometimes in the food forum. Bake vs fry. too much sugar vs not enough :furious::shocking::jerry:

Strangely, I was expecting a fish recipe. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

New to the site, will have a try at posting on a less volatile thread...

Oh rub it in your vain glorious bastard, even with a recipe post that takes hours, has 2/3rds of a bottle sitting there asking what to do with it _and_ with shanks! Been researching my weaknesses or something :)

How do you make your mash?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh rub it in your vain glorious bastard, even with a recipe post that takes hours, has 2/3rds of a bottle sitting there asking what to do with it _and_ with shanks! Been researching my weaknesses or something smile.gif

How do you make your mash?

Peel and wash the potatoes and then dice in to smallish chunks (cooks quicker)

Boil water with some salt, add potatoes and cook until a fork can easily split a piece. Drain, return to the pot with some butter and cream.

Use blender or masher until they reach a smooth consistency. If to dry or stiff add a little more cream. Don't forget to add salt and pepper. If to like, add some finely cut spring onions at the last minute for a little zing.

Cheers

PS. The last 1/3 or a bottle should be consumed before meal is finished cooking.

Cheers

PSS. Need two (2) bottles of red, one for the recipe and one to drink with the meal.

Edited by satanoperca

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How do you make your mash?

Hands down, the best mash I ever ate was at a hole-in-the-wall diner in NJ.

The guy there left the skin on his spuds which added a great earthy flavour, but the killer (in every sense) was the butter.

He added so much butter it wept out of the mash slightly, and I think it must have been about half a pound of butter to a pound of potato. But oh brother, did it taste good.

I tried to copy it at home but I wimped out, I could not bring myself to add that much butter...it was clearly on the right track, though, the taste came pretty close.

He also made the best ribs in the world, they set me on my Quest for the Perfect Baby Back Ribs, but that's a whole other story.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Curried Sausages.

Not sure if this is really just a kiwi thing. Never made it before but had an urge for a new kitchen item and making something new.

I bought an Electric Fry Pan. I believe this to be compulsory, all the mums I know that make it do it with an electric fry pan. This recipe is from the girlfriends mother (who is also a kiwi). Turns out it absolutely poured down so it even felt like being home, curried sausages for an early dinner when it is raining made me feel about 10 again.

Beef Sausages 5 or 6 fatties

Couple medium onions

5 cloves garlic

2 carrots sliced medium thickness

3 or 4 (?) TBSP Curry powder

2 tins coconut milk

Stock Cube

Boil water and simmer sausages for 5 or 10 minutes. Aim is to cook them so they are a similar texture to a terrine rather than like barbecued sausage. I don't know if this is the quality of sausage (I just get normal ones from the butcher so they aren't super fancy or anything) or the simmering that does it.

Turn fry pan on relatively high, fry onions, carrots and garlic in some oil, add sausages, tip curry powder over the top til it smells about right. Curry powder is so mild I don't know if you can overdo this without being silly, I guess I put maybe 3 or 4 tablespoons but am not sure.

Add coconut milk I only added 1, not enough gravy, should have added 2, and stock cube. Turn heat low and let it simmer away with the lid on. Make some rice.

Eat listening to the rain.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Curried Sausages.

Not sure if this is really just a kiwi thing. Never made it before but had an urge for a new kitchen item and making something new.

I bought an Electric Fry Pan. I believe this to be compulsory, all the mums I know that make it do it with an electric fry pan. This recipe is from the girlfriends mother (who is also a kiwi). Turns out it absolutely poured down so it even felt like being home, curried sausages for an early dinner when it is raining made me feel about 10 again.

Beef Sausages 5 or 6 fatties

Couple medium onions

5 cloves garlic

2 carrots sliced medium thickness

3 or 4 (?) TBSP Curry powder

2 tins coconut milk

Stock Cube

Boil water and simmer sausages for 5 or 10 minutes. Aim is to cook them so they are a similar texture to a terrine rather than like barbecued sausage. I don't know if this is the quality of sausage (I just get normal ones from the butcher so they aren't super fancy or anything) or the simmering that does it.

Turn fry pan on relatively high, fry onions, carrots and garlic in some oil, add sausages, tip curry powder over the top til it smells about right. Curry powder is so mild I don't know if you can overdo this without being silly, I guess I put maybe 3 or 4 tablespoons but am not sure.

Add coconut milk I only added 1, not enough gravy, should have added 2, and stock cube. Turn heat low and let it simmer away with the lid on. Make some rice.

Eat listening to the rain.

No way is this a kiwi only recipe. I too remember this one from my youth. Slightly different though. No coconut. I'd almost have to call curried sausages with coconut "malaysian".

Pre-fry sausages if you want to have chunks instead of the whole snorker.

Carrot , onion, and celery in equal measure, fry em till onion translucent. Add snags. I remember plain greasy numbers from the supermarket. I think we can probably go a bit more posh these days with the current master chef jive. Let's say cumberland. Chicken stock cube ,couple tbsp keens (to taste). Thicken with cornflour.

Second only to braised steak and onion also best cooked in an electric fry pan.

NZ- Familiar yet strange. A weird parallel universe.

Edited by staringclown

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No way is this a kiwi only recipe. I too remember this one from my youth. Slightly different though. No coconut. I'd almost have to call curried sausages with coconut "malaysian".

Pre-fry sausages if you want to have chunks instead of the whole snorker.

Carrot , onion, and celery in equal measure, fry em till onion translucent. Add snags. I remember plain greasy numbers from the supermarket. I think we can probably go a bit more posh these days with the current master chef jive. Let's say cumberland. Chicken stock cube ,couple tbsp keens (to taste). Thicken with cornflour.

Second only to braised steak and onion also best cooked in an electric fry pan.

NZ- Familiar yet strange. A weird parallel universe.

Where are you from? I wonder how common the carrot and sausages being curried is?

With mine I also slice the sausages, by simmering them you can cut them but they don't have that fried texture. Oh and due to some people not being big sausage fans I threw some chicken in there too just after the frying onions phase. Keens I assume you mean curry powder, I was looking at the Keens mustard (right beside it in the pantry) and thinking a little kick could be good. First time cooking I try to stick to the recipe though. Next time more coconut milk and some mustard powder.

My mums recipe is not with coconut milk, she used water and cornflour (we were not a rich family and there were a lot of us), she also grated the carrot. I have to say I think I prefer this one. It is quite possibly malay influenced as the girlfriends mother may be kiwi but the father is dutch and served in the dutch indonesian war.

He has a fondness for sambal that the average dutchman would be terrified of. When I was training in Utrecht a year back I cooked dinner for a bunch of uni students, did a meat sauce on pasta with a bit of chilli and this amazing parmesan I found. The chilli was enough that I could taste it but it wasn't huge, there were distinct comments regarding it. Probably hanging out in indonesia got his taste buds going, or of course getting shot in the head did the job (helmets are cool apparently).

How do you do your steak and onion?

And does anyone know how to do those fried potatoes in an electric fry pan where they are distinctly not potatoes from any other way of cooking? Tried them tonight and I remember what they are meant to be like but can't seem to make them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Where are you from? I wonder how common the carrot and sausages being curried is?

With mine I also slice the sausages, by simmering them you can cut them but they don't have that fried texture. Oh and due to some people not being big sausage fans I threw some chicken in there too just after the frying onions phase. Keens I assume you mean curry powder, I was looking at the Keens mustard (right beside it in the pantry) and thinking a little kick could be good. First time cooking I try to stick to the recipe though. Next time more coconut milk and some mustard powder.

My mums recipe is not with coconut milk, she used water and cornflour (we were not a rich family and there were a lot of us), she also grated the carrot. I have to say I think I prefer this one. It is quite possibly malay influenced as the girlfriends mother may be kiwi but the father is dutch and served in the dutch indonesian war.

He has a fondness for sambal that the average dutchman would be terrified of. When I was training in Utrecht a year back I cooked dinner for a bunch of uni students, did a meat sauce on pasta with a bit of chilli and this amazing parmesan I found. The chilli was enough that I could taste it but it wasn't huge, there were distinct comments regarding it. Probably hanging out in indonesia got his taste buds going, or of course getting shot in the head did the job (helmets are cool apparently).

How do you do your steak and onion?

And does anyone know how to do those fried potatoes in an electric fry pan where they are distinctly not potatoes from any other way of cooking? Tried them tonight and I remember what they are meant to be like but can't seem to make them.

From Australia. But we did travel heaps due to my dad being in the RAAF. (Brisbane, Sydney, Melbourne, Darwin and Malaysia - but I wasn't born for the Malaysian posting but I think it added a lot to culinary upbringing, malay chicken curry was another regular) I think the last time I had curried sausages was from the refectory at uni in '86. We had a period when their was about 12 of us at home and there was a roster of meals. Curried sausages was a good night. The worst was chow mein. It was a bit of mince, onion and soy sauce cooked with an entire cabbage. This was usually served with some crushed potato chips on top in an attempt to make it more palatable. smile.gif The braised steak was king.

Braised steak and onions

1kg rump steak cut into strips

2 tbsp oil

4 large onions sliced finely

4 cloves garlic

2 beef stock cubes

2 cups of water

Black pepper (lots)

salt (if required)

Fry onions until golden brown. Remove from fry pan

Fry meat till browned.

add onions and beef stock

turn heat down to low and leave to simmer until meat gets tender (1.5 - 20 hours), stirring occasionally.

The beauty of the electric fry pan is that you can turn quite low. You want the onions to disintegrate into

the gravy. The dish should end up quite dark. Serve with mashed spuds and peas.

Are you just frying the potatoes? We would occasionally have a thing called "mock fish" which was grated potatoes, salt, pepper and an egg fried in oil in the fry pan. They were also a favourite.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My grandmother does the most delicious potatoes in the electric frypan but I don't know how she does it. I suspect lots of lard, considering she had a quadruple bypass a few years ago.

My mother just Can't Do It, so whenever we have a big event dinner (eg, Christmas) my grandmother ALWAYS does the potatoes. I do remember a lot of complaining in years gone by about my mother's potatoes, so it is nice that such a silly conflict has since been resolved with the best possible outcome :)

I should probably go ask for a demonstration of how she does it while she's still with us. But I also need to ask the other half's grandmother how she does these Ukranian pasties, for the same reason. Old people and their secrets ...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

...Braised steak and onions...

Trying this one today, it is now all in the electric frypan and simmering. Hope it's good as there is a bucket load of it :)

Already planning the toasted sandwiches night with the left overs.

Tonights potatoes will be:

Sebago potatoes, wash and peel. Save skins.

Cubed and boiled in salted water with their skins until edges are translucent but potatoes aren't falling apart.

Drain and return pot to gas with low heat.

Skins discarded (man if I had a pig he would like them, sometimes I think of peeling thicker and saving the skins for frying)

Potatoes put through ricer back into pot (hands will get burned, hopefully the wine will take the edge off the burns)

Butter added and mixed through with a silicone spoon until it looks right (this is a lot of butter but not the 1:2 ratio above, maybe 1:5)

Mixing is more of a slow flat squashing of the tatties, not stirring and not a lot of it.

Splash of milk to soften it out.

This method usually get me that really thick but very smooth potatoes.

Am not sure if I will put some beans on the plate. Maybe.

Probably drink guiness with it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Trying this one today, it is now all in the electric frypan and simmering. Hope it's good as there is a bucket load of it :)

Already planning the toasted sandwiches night with the left overs.

Tonights potatoes will be:

Sebago potatoes, wash and peel. Save skins.

Cubed and boiled in salted water with their skins until edges are translucent but potatoes aren't falling apart.

Drain and return pot to gas with low heat.

Skins discarded (man if I had a pig he would like them, sometimes I think of peeling thicker and saving the skins for frying)

Potatoes put through ricer back into pot (hands will get burned, hopefully the wine will take the edge off the burns)

Butter added and mixed through with a silicone spoon until it looks right (this is a lot of butter but not the 1:2 ratio above, maybe 1:5)

Mixing is more of a slow flat squashing of the tatties, not stirring and not a lot of it.

Splash of milk to soften it out.

This method usually get me that really thick but very smooth potatoes.

Am not sure if I will put some beans on the plate. Maybe.

Probably drink guiness with it.

Cool. Hope you like it. If it is lacking a bit of zing try adding a little worcester sauce. The spuds sound great too.smile.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Trying this one today, it is now all in the electric frypan and simmering. Hope it's good as there is a bucket load of it :)

Already planning the toasted sandwiches night with the left overs.

Tonights potatoes will be:

Sebago potatoes, wash and peel. Save skins.

Cubed and boiled in salted water with their skins until edges are translucent but potatoes aren't falling apart.

Drain and return pot to gas with low heat.

Skins discarded (man if I had a pig he would like them, sometimes I think of peeling thicker and saving the skins for frying)

Potatoes put through ricer back into pot (hands will get burned, hopefully the wine will take the edge off the burns)

Butter added and mixed through with a silicone spoon until it looks right (this is a lot of butter but not the 1:2 ratio above, maybe 1:5)

Mixing is more of a slow flat squashing of the tatties, not stirring and not a lot of it.

Splash of milk to soften it out.

This method usually get me that really thick but very smooth potatoes.

Am not sure if I will put some beans on the plate. Maybe.

Probably drink guiness with it.

Sounds good. I like the idea of the flavour of the skins w/out the actual skins in there. I once (once only) tried to rice potatoes still with their skins. I do not recommend it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds good. I like the idea of the flavour of the skins w/out the actual skins in there. I once (once only) tried to rice potatoes still with their skins. I do not recommend it.

No the skin in the ricer is almost as bad as hair in a shower.

In the end the potatoes were unable to be done (certain upset people called making me work) and so instead a tin of peeled tatties was rudely upended into the mix and left for a half hour. Worked out well as the tinned tatties often do. I think they end up costing about the same as baby potatoes (I only buy them on special and ensure I have a decent stockpile) and they do have a slightly salty flavour so in an unexpected situation can make dishes a bit salty. Didn't really happen with the beef and onions.

All in all a good dish with pretty low cost and work. I used chuck steak and may have over loaded the pan during fry off of the meat as I am not used to a pan that takes a year to get back up to temp (a couple of the meat chunks were a tad stringy) so I can probably make it better. Definitely one I am adding to the list of easy meals and will probably get a work out in winter. Thinking of sqitching the water for a dark ber, bottled Guinness maybe or maybe that imperial stout from Indonesia (sing something or rather, has a lion on the label, lager is crap, imperial stout is great).

Tonights potatoes (making up for lack of awesome last nights potatoes) are to be roasted.

2 x sebago

3 x kipfler

1 x dutch cream

Peeled and boiled in reasonably large chunks, this is just going for the crispy outsides.

(I cut the potatoes in different styles to ensure that a good one is recognisable)

Put on bench about now to cool.

Pumpkin and sweet potato are in the oven now at 120 to just dry them out, no oil or anything.

In 2 hours or so a low edged baking dish will be put in an oven at a million degrees (pumpkin and sweet potato removed and a chicken added to their tray)

10 minutes later bacon fat will be added. It will sizzle.

Back in the oven for 3 or 4 minutes.

Add tatties, there will be sizzle.

Return tatties to Oven at about 180 with the chicken and pumpkin, sweet potato (and the parsnip I forgot to buy)

Cook til chicken is gold and tasty. Don't bother turning.

Tatties ought to be golden, turn. Remove chicken, pumpkin and sweet potato tray, chicken in foil.

Oven back to a million degrees to finish them tatties, more bacon fat if required. Want crispy outsides, inside is pretty much guaranteed to be cooked. Spin every few minutes as you do the rest. A quick grind of salt at this point can help but you want to be easy on it.

Make gravy with stuff in the chicken tray if there is any, otherwise make a faked gravy (same tin but mostly stock instead of chicken juices, they can be absorbed by the pumpkin if you are unlucky, the chicken in tinfoil will at least give some decent juices to finish).

I like peas and beans with any roast animal so I do them too and often steal their water for the gravy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Warning not for vegatarians or sooky people who are squemish about killing things.

First: Get shotgun and go out in the paddock/ bush block/forest and bag yourself a few bunnies. Note: Rabbits are returning after mixo then the caliche virus nearly wiped them out. There are more and more around which is excellant for us culinary types.

Next: Skin, gut, behead the little beasts and marrinade in some red plonk (dont be a woose, at least half a bottle) you have lying around for the night.

In the morning, throw into slow cooker (or pot on stove at very low temp) with some diced carrots, some leaks,tin of tomatos (big), splash of ev olive oil, tspoon paprika, tspoon salt, black pepper to taste and about 4-5 tblspoons worcestershire sauce.

In 8-10 hours debone and serve onto a bed of mashed potato's (or rice, pasta etc). Good winter tucker.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Warning not for vegatarians or sooky people who are squemish about killing things.

First: Get shotgun and go out in the paddock/ bush block/forest and bag yourself a few bunnies. Note: Rabbits are returning after mixo then the caliche virus nearly wiped them out. There are more and more around which is excellant for us culinary types.

Next: Skin, gut, behead the little beasts and marrinade in some red plonk (dont be a woose, at least half a bottle) you have lying around for the night.

In the morning, throw into slow cooker (or pot on stove at very low temp) with some diced carrots, some leaks,tin of tomatos (big), splash of ev olive oil, tspoon paprika, tspoon salt, black pepper to taste and about 4-5 tblspoons worcestershire sauce.

In 8-10 hours debone and serve onto a bed of mashed potato's (or rice, pasta etc). Good winter tucker.

That sounds pretty damn good. :) Plenty of bunnies around Canberra but alas no shotgun. :( Missus would never allow it. I suppose I could try chasing them down on foot. :flex:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now