tor

The Mandatory recipe Thread

1013 posts in this topic

In another telling sign that this country is going down the toilet, mediocrity in the form of allowing packet cake mix into CWA baking competitions has been sanctioned.

People without talent should be given rewards too you know.

No.

No no no no no no....

This cannot be...

It was bad enough when packet cake started to creep into church fetes, and I died a little inside when Coles lamingtons started showing up on school cake stalls.

But this? It's the end of the cake world as we know it.

Mind you, the CWA have turned into quite the collection of dictatorial old biddies in recent years. <_</>

I wonder if they aren't under some kind of generational new management, as they are quite a different breed from years past.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No.

No no no no no no....

This cannot be...

It was bad enough when packet cake started to creep into church fetes, and I died a little inside when Coles lamingtons started showing up on school cake stalls.

But this? It's the end of the cake world as we know it.

Mind you, the CWA have turned into quite the collection of dictatorial old biddies in recent years. <_</>/>

I wonder if they aren't under some kind of generational new management, as they are quite a different breed from years past.

The whole idea is ... I mean ... it ... it ... it strikes at the very roots of the ... of the ... it's the beginning of the end, the thin end of the wedge, a Bennite solution. Where will it end, the abolition of the monarchy?*

*Apologies to Sir Humphrey

:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lucky I cannot participate in Country Women's Association bake-offs.

Otherwise I'd rock up with cream-filled lamingtons from Aldi.

They're yummy! And only a one-step recipe to boot! thumbsup.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wahoo!!! I've figured out how to fry fish!!!

Yeah.... I'm a slow learner, alright...

I've always loved fried fish with a golden crust and buttery flavour, but all my attempts so far have ended with a bad result - more boiled than fried and with the flesh falling apart.

So, this is what I do:

1: Dry the fish fillets very thoroughly with paper towels. That's the key step. Pre-season with salt. I like Barramundi fillets.

2: Fry the fish in plenty of organic butter (Aldi has such butter at a reasonable price)

3: Serve with pre-mixed lettuce - add olive oil and apple cider vinegar to taste (I like the one with apple mother still in it).

Voilà!

Edited by AndersB

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wahoo!!! I've figured out how to fry fish!!!

...

Voilà!

and finally the infection spreads, next minute you'll be sourcing archival recipes calling for duck presses :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

and finally the infection spreads, next minute you'll be sourcing archival recipes calling for duck presses smile.gif

Let's not get carried away here.

I first have to master the art of boiling eggs.

Boiling an egg for 5 minutes seems to work well, but when I boil three eggs for 15 minutes they turn hard and rubbery. Weird!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Let's not get carried away here.

I first have to master the art of boiling eggs.

Boiling an egg for 5 minutes seems to work well, but when I boil three eggs for 15 minutes they turn hard and rubbery. Weird!

This is a common issue for the novice cook Anders.

All you need to do is place the eggs in the standard ratio of one egg per saucepan and boil all of them for 5 minutes and you'll have perfect eggs every time. You may need to purchase additional saucepans when catering for large groups... And possibly some additional stovetops.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is a common issue for the novice cook Anders.

All you need to do is place the eggs in the standard ratio of one egg per saucepan and boil all of them for 5 minutes and you'll have perfect eggs every time. You may need to purchase additional saucepans when catering for large groups... And possibly some additional stovetops.

Genius!!! Gotta give that a try!

Can't boil more than 4 eggs at a time though. sadwalk.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I find microwaving the best way to boil eggs. You get a very specific time as to how runny/hard you like them. Cover egg in foil place in mug and completely cover with water. Play around with nuke time till you get it perfect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I find microwaving the best way to boil eggs.

I used to have a microwave egg thing shaped like a chicken, as you say once you know the exact time they are great, but could only do one at a time. For boiled eggs I still use the Eggo (see here), which the kids got me for fathers day years ago, I like that it turns off when out of water. It works well if you adjust a little for using much bigger or smaller eggs.

Now they prefer 'Emu' eggs made using the silicone egg poachers holders which makes them look like the top off a boiled emu egg. You have to watch and poke these to get them just right.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to have a microwave egg thing shaped like a chicken, as you say once you know the exact time they are great, but could only do one at a time. For boiled eggs I still use the Eggo (see here), which the kids got me for fathers day years ago, I like that it turns off when out of water. It works well if you adjust a little for using much bigger or smaller eggs.

Now they prefer 'Emu' eggs made using the silicone egg poachers holders which makes them look like the top off a boiled emu egg. You have to watch and poke these to get them just right.

My method is not poaching eggs, but boiling them. I generally like two eggs and have a mug big enough for two. I've got the microwave time sorted. You could have 4+ if you had a container big enough and worked out the time. I'd like to use the foil for my head, but alas it's used on the eggs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd like to use the foil for my head, but alas it's used on the eggs.

I have different foil priorities, but if dinosaur eggs were readily available then my hat could be also used for cooking. :)/>

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I find microwaving the best way to boil eggs. You get a very specific time as to how runny/hard you like them. Cover egg in foil place in mug and completely cover with water. Play around with nuke time till you get it perfect.

Do you think I'm totally stupid, zaph?

No, please don't answer that question!

I've already tried your method before... it didn't work so well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.brisbanet...0416-2hwoh.html

Come on CWA, think outside the box

April 16, 2013

Blunt Instrument

John Birmingham tells stories. Most of them true.

Hang your head in shame, Queensland. When archaeologists from the future (probably equipped with laser spades), dig up the reasons for the fall of our civilisation, it won’t be climate change or bird flu wot done it. It’ll be the decision of the Queensland Country Women’s Association to allow packet cakes into their bake-offs.

Ladies, oh ladies, how could you?

Packet cakes? Are you extracting the urine?

In ninety years of finger-wagging, mouth-pursing, judgmental and censorious cake fascism never once has the QCWA suggested that packet cakes be treated with anything but scorn and mockery. Not even when nation’s strategic cake reserve was reduced to dangerously low levels by the fight against actual fascism, when whole squadrons of Spitfires and Hurricanes were kept aloft solely by the fumes drifting off care parcels of rum sodden fruit cake, wrapped up in wax paper and shipped back to the old country.

Queensland Country Women’s Association, you make JB sad. You make Lady Flo sad. And you make Hitler’s ghost think that only if he could have held out a little bit longer that useless fat bastard Goering might have finally had a bit of luck clearing the skies of the damnable Few when the rum sodden fruit cake was gone and there was nothing left but bloody dry, crumbly pound cake in a box standing between him and the white cliffs of Dover.

Oh, Queensland Country Women’s Association, what were you thinking?

...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To mark the day...

ANZAC Biscuits

1 cup flour

1 cup desiccated coconut

1 cup sugar (I like 1/2 brown, 1/2 white)

1 cup rolled oats

pinch salt

1/2 cup butter, melted

3 tbsp golden syrup

1/2 teaspoon bicarb soda

1-2 tbsp boiling water

Pre-heat oven to around 175 C.

Mix the flour, coconut, oats, sugar and salt together in a medium mixing bowl.

Melt the golden syrup and butter together until just runny, but not too hot.

Add the bicarb and the hot water to the butter mixture and stir. It will foam excitably.

Pour the frothing liquid into the dry mix.

Stir well to combine, until you have a moist but still fairly firm mixture.

Roll the mix into balls about the diameter of a ten cent piece, and place them on two greased and/or lined baking pans.

Press each ball down about half way to flat with the tines of a fork.

Space them reasonably well, as they will spread.

They should be done in around 15 minutes, but you might want to watch them fairly closely as this is a high-sugar recipe and as such is prone to burning, especially if you have an unreliable bastard of an oven like mine. :)/>

These biscuits keep well (which was the whole point of this recipe originally, as it was designed to be durable enough to ship to "our boys" at the front) but frankly they rarely hang around long enough for that to be an issue.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cumin coated lamb stirfry

Had this in a Sichuan restaurant on Friday night (Spicy Ginger in Civic - Very nice). It's not actually Sichuan but Uighur (an ethnic muslim minority) Anyway it was damn good so I thought I'd give it a crack at home.

Essentially it is a sh*tload of cumin roasted and ground up with Sichuan pepper, chilli, garlic powder, soy sauce and fresh garlic mashed up into a thick paste and then rubbed into thinly sliced lamb. It sounds spicy but it should be manageable for all but the most spice intolerant. I didn't add any salt beyond the soy. It didn't need it for my tastes.

Recipe:

1 kg lean lamb (I used leg steaks with all fat and gristle removed.)

3 Tbsp cumin seeds dry roasted until fragrant

2 tsp sichuan pepper dry roasted with the cumin seed

1 Tbsp soy sauce

1 tsp chilli powder

1 tsp garlic powder

1 Tbsp fresh garlic

1 onion cut up into chunks

1 red capsicum cut into chunks

2 Tbsp dried red chillies

1 bunch fresh coriander

1 Tbsp oil

Oil for deep frying

Method:

Slice the lamb into thin slices (1/4 inch)

Dry roast cumin seeds and sichuan pepper together and grind in a mortarium until coursely ground. (mostly powder)

Mix the roasted spices with the chilli powder, fresh garlic, garlic powder and soy sauce into a thick paste and rub the paste into the lamb slices well. Set aside to marinade.

Fry the onion and capsicum in 1 Tsbp oil till cooked and slightly charred (wok)

Set aside.

Heat deep frying oil until just smoking

Fry the dried chillis for 30 seconds. set aside

Fry the lamb in 3-4 batches for ~2 minutes per batch

drain and set aside.

Combine the chillies, lamb, chillies and the fresh coriander (roughly chopped) and serve with steamed rice.

Worthwhile. Not exactly the same as the restaurant version. But just as good.

CuminLamb_zps26616060.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yet another "how to cook steak" article

http://www.seriouseats.com/2013/06/the-food-lab-7-old-wives-tales-about-cooking-steak.html

My approach is to buy huge chunks of meat, cut them into steaks, salt (and pepper) them and freeze them.

Then thaw them in a bowl of water (still in the freezer proof bag) and cook them with the afore mentioned constant flipping and basting routine up to about 5 or 10 degrees off final temp and then whacking them in a convection oven to get to the desired temp.

Then no resting, just slice and serve.

I think he covers in the article most of the myths associated with my method and why people love my steaks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yet another "how to cook steak" article

http://www.seriouseats.com/2013/06/the-food-lab-7-old-wives-tales-about-cooking-steak.html

My approach is to buy huge chunks of meat, cut them into steaks, salt (and pepper) them and freeze them.

Then thaw them in a bowl of water (still in the freezer proof bag) and cook them with the afore mentioned constant flipping and basting routine up to about 5 or 10 degrees off final temp and then whacking them in a convection oven to get to the desired temp.

Then no resting, just slice and serve.

I think he covers in the article most of the myths associated with my method and why people love my steaks.

I can see the science in your method. My only concern is that I like a crust and a heavily char grilled surface born of salting and leaving the steak on one side for several minutes and turning once. the high temp crusting does drive the juices inward so the resting does make sense to reinvigorate the (crusty) steak.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

poor man's sous vide...

You could marinade while cooking as well. :)/>

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

poor man's sous vide...

You could marinade while cooking as well. smile.gif/>

that is very clever.... must try it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was watching Anthony Bourdain in Macau. He was talking about the macanese "national" dish called Minchi. It's basically savoury mince.

Anyway I gave it a go and it's very tasty. Half chinese and half portugese. We made a big bunch of it and it wasn't bad with rice. The best thing though was it made a great empanada filling on the second night.

We made this version. TBH I think the potatoes could be left out. At least for the empanadas. The Bourdain show had black wood ear fungus instead and it would have been better IMHO.

Ingredients

250 grms ground beef

250 grms ground pork

3 medium potatoes, cut in small cubes

1 medium onion, finely chopped

2 cloves garlic, chopped

1 bay leaf

2-3 tablespoons light soya sauce

1-2 tablespoons dark soya sauce

few drops of worcestershire sauce

1 coffeespoon of sugar*

a dash of cumin powder (optional)

How to make it

Deep fry the potatoes.

Separately, in a large saucepan or a wok , add onion, garlic and bay leaf to fry in olive oil.

Toss in pork and beef ground meat once the bay leaf releases its fragrant. Stir-fry the meat, when it is nearly cooked, add salt. Continue to stir the meat until it is totally loosen and has absorbed its own juice. Add pepper, soy sauce (light & dark), cumin powder, few drops of worcestershire sauce and sugar.

When the minchi is ready, add potatoes to it and mix it.

Serve minchi with plain rice.

Empanada pastry

I've made a few different recipes for empanada pastry. Including one that used pernot. This one is the winner. It is excellent followed exactly as stated.

Used a food processor with frozen butter. As little handling as possible is advised.

ingredients

2 1/4 cups unbleached all-purpose flour

1 1/2 teaspoons salt

1 stick (1/2 cup) cold unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch cubes

1 large egg

1/3 cup ice water

1 tablespoon distilled white vinegar

preparation

Sift flour with salt into a large bowl and blend in butter with your fingertips or a pastry blender until mixture resembles coarse meal with some (roughly pea-size) butter lumps.

Beat together egg, water, and vinegar in a small bowl with a fork. Add to flour mixture, stirring with fork until just incorporated. (Mixture will look shaggy.)

Turn out mixture onto a lightly floured surface and gather together, then knead gently with heel of your hand once or twice, just enough to bring dough together. Form dough into a flat rectangle and chill, wrapped in plastic wrap, at least 1 hour.

Roll out the pastry about 1 mm and cut rounds of about 6 inches. I used a plate. Smaller if you want dainty or you enjoy working. Brush with eggwash. Bake 20-25 minutes.

These are great cold the next day as well.

*I assumed a coffeespoon was similar to a teaspoon

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Makin' bacon

So I bought a pork belly from CostCo today and it is brining away happily in a 6.4% solution in the back room. I chose the recipe based on some pretty good results with ribs recently.

I had streaky bacon in NZ and for some reason you can't get it here. It's everywhere in the UK as well. Great for lardons and various other cultures cooking.

So I thought I'd have a stab at making my own. This could be valuable as a survivalist technique for food preservation. :) Not why I'm doing it of course - I'm just bourgeois. :laugh:

3.3 kg pork belly boneless. Has to be wet brined for 7 days and then smoked. Will change the brine every 24 hours. No nitrites except for one pink salt dose on the third day.

Thinking of a 90 degree smoke for 12 hours. Some sites say cook to 150 to kill botulism but this could be handled by cooking the bacon itself. Anyone had any experience with bacon? Advice appreciated.

I will report progress.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a dream the other night where I made smoked rice risotto with smoked chicken and peas. Not up there with Martin Luther maybe but what the hell I played it out in real life. I don't know if I have made risotto before, if I have it was at least 10 years ago.

Chuck chicken in the kitchen sink with a cup of salt and a cup of sugar and fill with water leave for about 5 hours.

Using one of these: http://www.mightyape.com.au/product/Non-Stick-Chicken-Roaster/20954870/?utm_source=google&utm_medium=product-search&utm_campaign=mightyape&gclid=CJe3m9CEqbgCFeZapgodLhEAUw

Fill the base with rice and sit the chicken on the spikey thing. I did _not_ pull those fatty bits off from just inside the cavity.

Smoked at 200F until it was super brown then ran it up to 300F for maybe half an hour.

My idea at this point was to get smoke into the rice and also all the chicken juices and fats as well.

Then the chicken got put into a bowl for juice collection

Then I fried one of those "whole round garlics" minced in a tablespoon of butter or so (I don't know what they are called but it is slightly smaller than a golf ball and effectively one piece).

I found I didn't have any frozen peas so I heated an emergency tin of peas with the liquid they have in the tin and some chicken stock from a tetra pack (I think that was the woolworths brand)

When the minced garlic was stinky I chucked the rice from the smoker in and let it fry a bit. Dr Internet told me to aim for "slightly translucent around the edges" so I did that.

Then added some of the hot pea juice and stock mix, maybe half a cup, and stirred it til the liquid was gone and the bottom of the pan clean with each stir.

Then I added about another half a cup, gave it a quick stir and returned to the chicken.

Although, as the bowl was stationary, I gave it a decent grind of salt and pepper, this is just a habit.

By this point the chicken had dropped maybe half a cup of juice into the bowl so I threw that into the rice and gave it a stir.

I cut the chicken up over the bowl into quarters then chucked the spine and legs into a tupperware container, I figure I'll do something with them later. One wing I ate, the other was delivered to the girlfriend to ameliorate "what the hell are you doing in the kitchen and where is my dinner?" feelings.

and chucked the juice from the bowl over the rice and gave it a stir.

The chicken boobs I broke the meat off with a fork and sort of half arsedly broke it up

Then I stirred the rice til all the liquid was gone and poured the pea / stock mix including the peas onto the rice and biffed the chicken in as well.

And I stirred and tasted and stirred and tasted for a bit until the rice was only just cooked. It still had a firm core.

First taste it was not a sensation but it was oddly good and after one pretty big bowl I had another which surprised me that I wanted it.

I used to work in a BBQ chicken shop as a kid and discovered that BBQ chicken gravy with peas on white bread is one of my favourite foods in the world. This is definitely in that vein although probably more subtle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a dream the other night where I made smoked rice risotto with smoked chicken and peas. Not up there with Martin Luther maybe but what the hell I played it out in real life. I don't know if I have made risotto before, if I have it was at least 10 years ago.

Chuck chicken in the kitchen sink with a cup of salt and a cup of sugar and fill with water leave for about 5 hours.

Using one of these: http://www.mightyape.com.au/product/Non-Stick-Chicken-Roaster/20954870/?utm_source=google&utm_medium=product-search&utm_campaign=mightyape&gclid=CJe3m9CEqbgCFeZapgodLhEAUw

Fill the base with rice and sit the chicken on the spikey thing. I did _not_ pull those fatty bits off from just inside the cavity.

Smoked at 200F until it was super brown then ran it up to 300F for maybe half an hour.

My idea at this point was to get smoke into the rice and also all the chicken juices and fats as well.

Then the chicken got put into a bowl for juice collection

Then I fried one of those "whole round garlics" minced in a tablespoon of butter or so (I don't know what they are called but it is slightly smaller than a golf ball and effectively one piece).

I found I didn't have any frozen peas so I heated an emergency tin of peas with the liquid they have in the tin and some chicken stock from a tetra pack (I think that was the woolworths brand)

When the minced garlic was stinky I chucked the rice from the smoker in and let it fry a bit. Dr Internet told me to aim for "slightly translucent around the edges" so I did that.

Then added some of the hot pea juice and stock mix, maybe half a cup, and stirred it til the liquid was gone and the bottom of the pan clean with each stir.

Then I added about another half a cup, gave it a quick stir and returned to the chicken.

Although, as the bowl was stationary, I gave it a decent grind of salt and pepper, this is just a habit.

By this point the chicken had dropped maybe half a cup of juice into the bowl so I threw that into the rice and gave it a stir.

I cut the chicken up over the bowl into quarters then chucked the spine and legs into a tupperware container, I figure I'll do something with them later. One wing I ate, the other was delivered to the girlfriend to ameliorate "what the hell are you doing in the kitchen and where is my dinner?" feelings.

and chucked the juice from the bowl over the rice and gave it a stir.

The chicken boobs I broke the meat off with a fork and sort of half arsedly broke it up

Then I stirred the rice til all the liquid was gone and poured the pea / stock mix including the peas onto the rice and biffed the chicken in as well.

And I stirred and tasted and stirred and tasted for a bit until the rice was only just cooked. It still had a firm core.

First taste it was not a sensation but it was oddly good and after one pretty big bowl I had another which surprised me that I wanted it.

I used to work in a BBQ chicken shop as a kid and discovered that BBQ chicken gravy with peas on white bread is one of my favourite foods in the world. This is definitely in that vein although probably more subtle.

I've made smoked chicken risotto with those smoked chicken breasts you can buy in the shops. They have tough "skin" even though they're skinless so I wasn't that enamoured by the result.

Good effort though. The smoked rice sounds interesting. :) I was reading something about smoked salt which I will also have to try. Probably on a bacon website.

Today's the day when I smoke up my home made bacon. I did rinse the brine out a couple of times to prevent botulism however having read a lot more about the process I should have used the nitrites. I've ordered some online. It apparently gives the cured flavour. Additionally, I think I'll try dry curing as most of the forums say this gives a lot better results.

Anyhoo off to fire up the Kamado. I'm not expecting great results but hopefully I won't poison myself either... :o

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now