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The Mandatory recipe Thread

1013 posts in this topic

It's worth bearing in mind that a man who can cook is unlikely to be single for long...

We can but hope :)

BTW I thought you hated lentils?

yep had never had them as "european food" only as (probably badly made) Indian and they just never excited me.

It sounds good and I know I used to hate brussels sprouts. My mum would boil them mercilessly. I love them now. Par boiled with butter they are excellent. Ms clown has been toasting almonds and tossing garlic olive oil with green beans. Nuts and veg in general seem to work.

The sprout is the awesome of food, I think I posted my bastardised maggie beer brussel sprout mornay. It is awesome. I also use them instead of pasta for sauces occasionally.

I go through a punnet or two of sprouts a week.

I hadn't tried vino cotto until our recent SA trip. I like the taste. Like a sweet(er) balsalmic. Added some to my meringue last night instead of cream of tartar as a stabilser. Worked.

First time for me also. It is a great flavour just straight from the bottle.

I made the gabriel gate chocolate mousse last night. I suspect they turned out well but I haven't piped the cream and added the raspberries as yet. They have published the recipes ahead of time so you can plan your viewing. :)

am watching last nights tour now. I keep forgetting to tape the evening highlights with Gabriel. I like him, so doofy.

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We can but hope :)

Ms clown and are rooting for you. :thumbsup:

yep had never had them as "european food" only as (probably badly made) Indian and they just never excited me.

More puy lentil recipes it is then.

The sprout is the awesome of food, I think I posted my bastardised maggie beer brussel sprout mornay. It is awesome. I also use them instead of pasta for sauces occasionally.

I go through a punnet or two of sprouts a week.

Like mini cabbages. I use them in my model village. I'll try the mornay though.

First time for me also. It is a great flavour just straight from the bottle.

I'm seriously considering buying an ice cream maker. But there's no coming back from that step.

am watching last nights tour now. I keep forgetting to tape the evening highlights with Gabriel. I like him, so doofy.

That accent is fake. His name is brian wilson and he hails from bristol.

I would pay money for a single rider to ride the same path at a safe clip giving pleasing commentary. The sooner the NBN is deployed the better.

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...it was the salmon ... mousse!

I didn't eat the salmon mousse...

Shall we take our cars? :D

Back on the tour de france odyssey.

Cooked grandmas chicken casserole (poulet cocotte grandmère) from the 2012 taste le tour.

This really is a bit rich for me. Not much butter goes into it (a mere two tbsp) but the skin on chicken renders a lot of fat. Then add the fried potatoes and man I felt like I needed to go and ride a stage. I couldn't finish a whole plate. This is wall of butter cooking.

Ingredients

3 tbsp vegetable oil

2 tbsp butter

4 free-range chicken drumsticks

4 free-range chicken thighs

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

1 brown onion, diced

1 bay leaf

2 tbsp rosemary sprigs

150g bacon, diced

100ml white Macon wine or other chardonnay

300g baby mushrooms, washed

4 medium potatoes, cubed

View conversion table

Preparation

Heat 1 tablespoon of the oil and the butter in a wide heavy-based pan and brown the chicken pieces for a few minutes. Season with salt and pepper and add the onion, bay leaf and rosemary and stir well. Add the bacon and cook for a few minutes.

Add the white wine and bring to the boil. Stir in the mushrooms, cover with foil and a lid and cook over low heat for about 30 minutes.

Heat the remaining oil in a heavy frypan and cook the potato cubes for about 15 minutes or until they are almost cooked. Transfer the potatoes to the chicken dish and mix gently and cook for a further 5 minutes to combine the wonderful flavours.

Serve two pieces of chicken on each plate with the vegetables

stickyChicken.jpg

Let the leftovers sit in the fridge for a day however and we could skim the fat off. We were left with gelatinous chickeny goodness. Bacon, mushrooms, potatoes and drumsticks. So we thought we'd make vol au vents!

Strip the chicken from the bone. Remove the potatoes and do something else with them. (croquets would work) Chop leftover chicken casserole including bacon mushroom and gelatinous stocky goodness into 1 cm cubes. Make a white sauce Combine left over chicken, 3 Tbsp fresh finely chopped parsley and white sauce. I thought briefly of adding some grated parmesan but I think this would ruin the chicken flavour. Place in store bought vol au vent cases and bake for 15-20 minutes on about 150c. Eat while watching male buttocks riding bikes through the french countryside. (I'm only watching for the crashes)

Voila!

volAuVent.jpg

Edit: Anyone seen that julia childs flic? Apparently she made a french dish per day for a year and blooged it. It's possible but I have no idea what she did with the left overs and damn - that super size me documentary wouldn't have a thing on a year of french cooking...

As Le tour heads into the mountains we could be looking at fondue as early as tomorrow night. :o

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One of the interesting things with being single is that I haven't really tried many new things recently as I have been working through "the things I know how to make" to be a show off :)

Last night I bit the bullet and did a side dish dinner with a few things I have been meaning to try. There was a stand out winner.

Portenos (restaurant in Sydney) have a signature dish of brussel sprouts. I ate them, they were okay. I think they suffered a bit from being made in a restaurant but they did seem to have great potential so I had a bash last night. Apparently this was done on masterchef. Regardless it is actually pretty good and easy.

Handful of walnut into a dry pan over medium heat til a little bit toasted. Remove to bowl.

1 punnet of baby brussel sprouts, cut in half, I don't bother with the crosses or cutting the bottom or any of that nonsense.

[...and another million steps or so in this cooking extravaganza]

I had a great dinner tonight based on brussel sprouts.

1. Cut brussel sprouts in half

2. Parboil them in a bit of salted water with a few pinches of sugar until they are just about soft

3. Fry the brussel sprouts in quality butter together with some IKEA frozen meatballs.

Yummm!!!! drool.gif

But I had to eat it myself, the rest of the family were put off by the smell of boiling brussel sprouts. Hah! Their loss!

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Just having dessert now that continues on the smelly theme with really stinky cheese, grapes and wine.

Pure bliss...

My wife had sandwiches and some raw cold pressed veggie juice. rolleyes.gif

I'll drink to that!

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I had a great dinner tonight based on brussel sprouts.

1. Cut brussel sprouts in half

2. Parboil them in a bit of salted water with a few pinches of sugar until they are just about soft

3. Fry the brussel sprouts in quality butter together with some IKEA frozen meatballs.

Yummm!!!! drool.gif

But I had to eat it myself, the rest of the family were put off by the smell of boiling brussel sprouts. Hah! Their loss!

Do you have to roll the IKEA meatballs yourself? :P

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Do you have to roll the IKEA meatballs yourself? :P

Nope, I just open the pack with an Allen key.

It's good to always have a pack or two of IKEA meatballs in the freezer. Meatballs are great for salads, or with potatoes and slow-cooked onion, or even to add to leftovers if there is not enough for a whole meal. You are only ever three steps away from a complete dinner!

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Nope, I just open the pack with an Allen key.

It's good to always have a pack or two of IKEA meatballs in the freezer. Meatballs are great for salads, or with potatoes and slow-cooked onion, or even to add to leftovers if there is not enough for a whole meal. You are only ever three steps away from a complete dinner!

:laugh:

I will try them if I get a chance.

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:laugh:

I will try them if I get a chance.

Thumbs up on the Ikea meatball. Since this is the recipe thread I must add that the GRADDSAS gravy is essential.

I am not kidding.

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Thumbs up on the Ikea meatball. Since this is the recipe thread I must add that the GRADDSAS gravy is essential.

I am not kidding.

I'd never heard of it. Strangely alluring.

Recipe

Serves four:

3 dl (1.2 cups) Cream, double or single

1 Shallot

1 small Carrot

2-3 tsp Soy Sauce

about 1 cube chicken or meat Stock

Black pepper

Butter

1. Peel and dice both shallot and carrot. Fry in butter until soft in a sauce-pan. (using the vegetables is optional, but tastes great.)

2. Add cream and soy sauce to the vegetables in the pan, also add black pepper and stock, whisk until thickened, then remove from heat. Strain the sauce. Don't forget to taste before serving.

Sounds rich but following my recent french experience, I'm up for the challenge. :)

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Thumbs up on the Ikea meatball. Since this is the recipe thread I must add that the GRADDSAS gravy is essential.

I am not kidding.

Yes , gräddsås is essential with köttbullar. Grädde means 'cream', so gräddsås is just sause with a cream base - but normally it has a gravy flavour to it.

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Yes , gräddsås is essential with köttbullar. Grädde means 'cream', so gräddsås is just sause with a cream base - but normally it has a gravy flavour to it.

Is the carrot base authentic Anders? Because I've never heard of it (let alone tasted it) I might make a detour north on the weekend from le tour! I'll have to make my own meatballs as the nearest IKEA is in Homebush and a quick web search reveals they are out of the balls. <_< The gräddsås I can do.

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Is the carrot base authentic Anders? Because I've never heard of it (let alone tasted it) I might make a detour north on the weekend from le tour! I'll have to make my own meatballs as the nearest IKEA is in Homebush and a quick web search reveals they are out of the balls. <_< The gräddsås I can do.

You're asking the wrong guy when it comes to culinary finesse. For what it's worth, though - I've never heard of carrots being used in gräddsås. But carrots are sweet, so perhaps it works?

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You're asking the wrong guy when it comes to culinary finesse. For what it's worth, though - I've never heard of carrots being used in gräddsås. But carrots are sweet, so perhaps it works?

OK, I have a meatball recipe. It's Jamie Oliver but is was published in the Guardian so it's probably alright.

The thing is there is no swedish meatball stand at the canberra multicultural festival so I'm thinking of impersonating a swede. I have a red beard and am quite stocky. Alas, I have brown eyes and to the trained swedish eye, I'm obviously not swedish. I don't know what's swedish for who is this irish looking person impersonating a swede but this won't matter to all but the most swedish. In Canberra that's mainly diplomatic staff. Mork, mork, mork!

So without denigrating the swedish culture, I think I can make a contribution. It's berries rather than carrot with Jamie. I don't know what lingon berries are though.

Ingredients

Serves 4–6

For the meatballs

• a handful of mixed fresh herbs, such as dill, flat-leaf parsley or chives, roughly chopped

• 300g minced pork, the best quality you can afford

• 300g minced beef

• 1 large egg, preferably free-range or organic

• 100ml milk

• 75g dried breadcrumbs

• 1 teaspoon ground allspice

• sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

• olive oil

For the sauce

• juice of ½ a lemon

• 300ml beef stock, preferably organic (if using a stock cube, ½ is enough)

• 1 tablespoon plain flour

• 60ml double cream

• 1 x 200g jar of lingon berry, cranberry, blackberry or blackcurrant jam, to serve

Even people who don't know much about Swedish food will probably at least have heard of, or tried, the great dish that is Swedish meatballs – especially since Ikea took over the world (I've been told they sell loads of these in their cafeterias). Paired with mash and warm lingon berry sauce, they make a perfect meal: tasty, comforting, with a hint of sweetness. If you've got a load of people coming for dinner you could make a batch or two of these and let everyone help themselves.

These meatballs are easy to make; just make sure you've got a wide casserole-type pan. It will make your life easier and you'll use it all the time, so it's worth investing in.

Set aside a few of the herbs, then put the rest into a large bowl with the pork, beef, egg, milk, breadcrumbs and allspice. Add a good pinch of salt and pepper, then get your clean hands in there and scrunch and mix it well. Divide the mixture in half, then pat and roll each half into a sausage shape. Cut each one into 15 equal pieces, then wet your hands and roll 30 little balls. Keep wetting your hands as you go so you get nice round elegant meatballs. Put them on a large oiled tray, then cover with clingfilm and pop into the fridge for 1 hour to firm up.

When you're ready to cook, put your largest pan on a medium heat and add a glug of olive oil. Once hot, add the meatballs and fry gently for 10 to 15 minutes, tossing occasionally, until they are golden brown.

Transfer the meatballs to a large plate. Spoon away any excess fat from the pan, then add the lemon juice, a splash of stock, the flour, the cream, a heaped tablespoon of lingon berry or berry jam and a good pinch of salt and pepper. Bring to the boil, then turn the heat down and reduce until you have a nice consistency that will cling to the meatballs. Taste it, then season with a pinch of salt and pepper. Return the meatballs to the pan and move them around so they get coated in the sauce.

Serve your meatballs – eight per person is about right – drizzled with any lovely sauce left in the pan and with a few spoonfuls of warmed-up jam on top. They'll go brilliantly next to mashed or crispy potatoes, or even rice, but personally, I love these on top of smashed celeriac mash. Sprinkle over your reserved chopped herbs and tuck in!

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OK, I have a meatball recipe. It's Jamie Oliver but is was published in the Guardian so it's probably alright.

The thing is there is no swedish meatball stand at the canberra multicultural festival so I'm thinking of impersonating a swede. I have a red beard and am quite stocky. Alas, I have brown eyes and to the trained swedish eye, I'm obviously not swedish. I don't know what's swedish for who is this irish looking person impersonating a swede but this won't matter to all but the most swedish. In Canberra that's mainly diplomatic staff. Mork, mork, mork!

So without denigrating the swedish culture, I think I can make a contribution. It's berries rather than carrot with Jamie. I don't know what lingon berries are though.

Yep, that's pretty close to my mum's meatball recipe. Lingon berries are cranberries, basically.

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Just boshed this out and it worked. Nothing to write home about but definately a winner in the “Healthy and quick as well as being easy to make” stakes

1/2 packet of pasta (doesn’t matter what type) ...... 200 grams (ish)

1/2 jar of Mild & 1/2 jar of Medium Salsa

1x 400 gram of diced tomatoes

Maybe some sliced olives ( I used them tonight and it worked but it isn’t in the recipe)

1. Cook ya pasta

2. Drain ya pasta

3. Add everything else and heat

4. Serve

So that’s four (maybe five) ingredients and four steps. How can you go wrong?

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Just boshed this out and it worked. Nothing to write home about but definately a winner in the “Healthy and quick as well as being easy to make” stakes

1/2 packet of pasta (doesn’t matter what type) ...... 200 grams (ish)

1/2 jar of Mild & 1/2 jar of Medium Salsa

1x 400 gram of diced tomatoes

Maybe some sliced olives ( I used them tonight and it worked but it isn’t in the recipe)

1. Cook ya pasta

2. Drain ya pasta

3. Add everything else and heat

4. Serve

So that’s four (maybe five) ingredients and four steps. How can you go wrong?

But where's the cheeese? (Grommit)

I bet you are awesome at camping. :)

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So that’s four (maybe five) ingredients and four steps. How can you go wrong?

Well you would be sober when you ate and that, for me, is the sign of a bad recipe :)

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Well you would be sober when you ate and that, for me, is the sign of a bad recipe :)

Perhaps the reason for the camping condition?

I am back on the slow cooker picnic pork. Very excited...and leftover scalloped potatoes too! Its like Easter dinner, without the relatives!

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Cooked grandmas chicken casserole (poulet cocotte grandmère) from the 2012 taste le tour.

This really is a bit rich for me. Not much butter goes into it (a mere two tbsp) but the skin on chicken renders a lot of fat. Then add the fried potatoes and man I felt like I needed to go and ride a stage. I couldn't finish a whole plate. This is wall of butter cooking.

I tried this one too (mostly because you had hehehehe). Quite surprised at how good it was. Very simple recipe and massively great flavour, the richness didn't both me much.

Next up for this week is beef cheeks!

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I tried this one too (mostly because you had hehehehe). Quite surprised at how good it was. Very simple recipe and massively great flavour, the richness didn't both me much.

Next up for this week is beef cheeks!

It certainly brings out the sticky chicken flavours.

Beef cheeks are in vogue at the moment. I haven't seen them for sale anywhere here. If they are especially fantastic (compared to say chuck steak) I'd like to know. :) I will try harder to hunt them down.

I have had the Guanciale (Italian jowl bacon) and it is pretty good in a pasta.

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It certainly brings out the sticky chicken flavours.

Beef cheeks are in vogue at the moment. I haven't seen them for sale anywhere here. If they are especially fantastic (compared to say chuck steak) I'd like to know. :) I will try harder to hunt them down.

I have had the Guanciale (Italian jowl bacon) and it is pretty good in a pasta.

You can sometimes get beef cheeks in Woollies, near wherever they sell the lamb shanks and offal and other dubious items that they feel they have to package in ultra-heavy duty plastic vacuum packaging.

They freeze very well, so get extra if do you see them.

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Peri peri chicken.

A friend of mine has recently returned from a brief tour through all parts known including portugal. I seemed he was too busy eating his way through europe to record any first hand reports of the economic chaos but he did come back raving about portugese charcoal grilled chilli chicken. He is a fellow kamado owner.

Gave it a go tonight using an SBS recipe. The main thing I was attracted to was scotch in the marinade. ;) Apparently the Portuguese use a lot of booze in their cooking.

Warning: this is chilli hot

The cooking...

charcoal.jpg

The result...

peripericharcoal.jpg

It's good. Very good in fact.

Charcoal with with peri peri sauce

Ingredients

1 whole chicken

Marinade

8 cloves garlic, crushed

Pinch salt

Juice of 2 lemons

1 tsp bay leaf powder

2 tsp paprika

2 shots scotch whisky (80mls)

2 tbsp very soft butter

1 whole chicken

Rock salt

Piri Piri Sauce

10 – 12 birdseye chillies, chopped finely (medium size, medium heat)

Pinch salt

Juice of ½ lemon

100mls olive oil

2 tbsp garlic powder (not crushed garlic as the mixture will be too runny)

Mix all ingredients into a thickish dipping sauce.

View conversion table

Preparation

Mix all ingredients for marinade together.

Prepare chicken – trim away excess fat. Then use a sharp knife or kitchen scissors to cut the chicken through the breastbone. Open out, turn over and flatten by pressing down with your hand along the backbone.

Make a small cut under each wing to help it flatten further. Make several incisions in the flesh with a sharp knife. This will allow the flesh to absorb the marinade and allow fat to drain. Prick all over with a large fork.

Brush both sides with the marinade and sprinkle with rock salt. Cover and marinate in the fridge for 30 – 45 minutes.

Cook over a charcoal BBQ (or any hot grill if you don’t have a BBQ) turning frequently and basting continuously with the remaining marinade until both sides are golden brown – approximately 30 minutes.

Cut the chicken into pieces with kitchen scissors and brush with Piri Piri sauce.

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