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The Mandatory recipe Thread

1013 posts in this topic

natto is foul, foul stuff. wife and kids love it, i have to leave the room when they eat it... ugh.

sashimi just means sliced raw fish. if you slap it on a rectangle of sushi rice (pref with a bit of wasabi) it becomes sushi. but as RE says, you don't need raw fish for it to be sushi.

I have been working up to a full style gumbo with the sliced okra oozing. Natto is just that step too far. And for breakfast? man...

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COCONUT RICE WITH BEANS

Saute until softened:

1 Onion

Garlic (to taste)

1 Red chilli

1 Tablespoon thyme

Add in 1 cup long grain rice

Pour in good quality 400ml coconut Milk and 100ml vegetable stock.

Let simmer 12-28min untill liquid has been absorbed and rice is tender.

Stir in 420 g tin of kidney beans (drained and rinsed).

Season to taste- fresh thyme to garnish.

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COCONUT RICE WITH BEANS

...

I did something very similar to that but I think I used cannelini beans (kidney beans make me think of dirty dirty vegeterians :)

To anyone thinking this looks stodgy and bland, it works very well. Just be carefull with the chillis. I used significantly more than Gaia and ran into some acceptance issues hehehe.

I did rinse my rice very heavily before hand (as per Urchins suggestions) and used jasmine rice which may have helped avoiding the sticky pile of carbohydrate syndrome. Do you have any tips regarding rice Gaia?

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I usually pre rinse the rice until water runs clear.

I muss confess I am not a very good cook and the reciepie was made in my uni days. It's is cheap, easy and nutritious! I bet you could make it for less than 3 dollars a head (4 people).

I just thought I should add to the Mandatory Reciepe Thread so I can rant and rave about all that is 'Sustainable'. I'm now very lucky to have a great cook who makes the family meals.

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Burned Spaghetti

This is awesome and is supposedly easy, I think it is stolen from Antonio Carlucci (who's cooking is awesome but recipes I think are pretty crap, most of us can't get tomatoes good enough to make a plain tomato sauce that is actually any good without spending mega).

Anyway.

Leftover meat in a red spaghetti sauce (mince if you are english, shredded meat if you are into tastiness hehehe)

Leftover pasta

Heat up a big frying pan with a tiny bit of oil (and I mean tiny, so tiny I cannot actually do it, I think this is why mine fails)

Put pasta in

Put sauce in

Let it burn

stir (quick edit, she stirs it with tongs so more of a pluck and relocate than a spoon type stir)

Let it burn

stir

Let it burn.

The times between stirring appear to be important, I get nervous and stir it too often and have too much oil so it fries instead of effectively dry burning.

What you are after is a big old bowl of hot spaghetti and sauce with lots of chunks of bits that are burned but not incinerated. I guess massively caramelised is the chefs description.

I like to throw tobasco sauce on mine as well as stupid amounts of pepper. It is one of my all time favourite dishes and I can't make it :( I don't think I am actually even allowed to try and make this any more because mine is so crap compared to hers.

Doesn't need any cheese. Although once when I was playing with various ways of putting parmesan onto a sauce I loaded one up with vegetable peeler slices of cheese mixed into the sauce, when we burned that it was kind of cool. Not great enough that we do it deliberately but if there was cheese in there for the burning it is not a problem.

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Burned Spaghetti

In somewhat the same vein, I give you:

Food Poisoning (aka Green Beans of Doom)

Required:

  • 1 thigh-fillet, at least four days in the fridge
  • Green beans (enough to fill an A4 baking dish)
  • Macadamia Oil
  • Fresh Lemons
  • Ricotta, or fetta, cheese

Path to Awesome (ie how to cook it)

Preheat oven to 200degrees Celsius

Pan sear green beans in macadamia oil.

At about half time (you're the cook figure it out), squeeze the lemon o'er the top.

Cook to al dente. Remove from pan and add to baking dish.

Splooge ricotta on top (or chopped fetta) and put into oven.

Bake until the cheese is just a little brown.

Optional

Turning off the oven.

Apply cheese normally - refrain from baking

Don't eat chicken.

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In somewhat the same vein, I give you:

Food Poisoning (aka Green Beans of Doom)

Required:

  • 1 thigh-fillet, at least four days in the fridge
  • Green beans (enough to fill an A4 baking dish)
  • Macadamia Oil
  • Fresh Lemons
  • Ricotta, or fetta, cheese

Path to Awesome (ie how to cook it)

Preheat oven to 200degrees Celsius

Pan sear green beans in macadamia oil.

At about half time (you're the cook figure it out), squeeze the lemon o'er the top.

Cook to al dente. Remove from pan and add to baking dish.

Splooge ricotta on top (or chopped fetta) and put into oven.

Bake until the cheese is just a little brown.

Optional

Turning off the oven.

Apply cheese normally - refrain from baking

Don't eat chicken.

:lol: Sounds like a rough night. :sadwalk:

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...Don't eat chicken.

I got to there thinking you were drunk and cocked it up, nicely done.

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I got to there thinking you were drunk and cocked it up, nicely done.

Could be. I'm drunk a lot.

Regarding delicious delicious lentils, this is not my recipe, but I've made it several times with slight variations on the spices and herbs. http://www.bhf.org.uk/keeping_your_heart_healthy/healthy_eating/heart_healthy_recipes/carrot_and_lentil_soup.aspx

Carrot and Lentil Soup

For six portions, you will need:

  • 2 teaspoons vegetable oil
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 2 sticks celery, finely chopped
  • 2 carrots, coarsely grated
  • 55g (2oz) split red lentils
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon ground coriander
  • 850ml (1.5 pints) vegetable stock
  • Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

1. Heat oil in a saucepan. Add onion and celery and cook until soft, stirring.

2. Add carrots, lentils, cumin, coriander, stock and black pepper. Stir to mix.

3. Cover, bring to the boil, then simmer gently for 15-20 minutes or until carrots and lentils are soft, stirring occasionally.

4. Ladle into soup bowls. Serve hot with fresh crusty bread.

For an added bang, massage some chili seeds, coriander and mustard seeds into some butter, place into ramekins and serve with the soup for tasting.

French lentils (the black ones) work well also.

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as its mandatory i better add smething.

--------------------------

tuna and corn potato

1 can tuna in spring water

1 can corn

1 tub philly light cream cheese

1 large potatoes per person

wrap potatoes in tea towels put in microwave on high for3 min per tatty

turn and put on high again for 3 min per tatty

take out leave, to cool a few min wrapped. open cans and drain

mix tuna and corn together, add salt n pepper.

watch out for thaters they will be boiling hot.

cut up potatoes, with a cross, and spoon in a decent amount of cream cheese.

spoon in corn and tuna mix.

serve

------

time may vary depending on microwave. and large tatty means fits n your fist, if smaller 2 would count as 1 so basically a handfull of potatoes

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...large tatty means fits n your fist, if smaller 2 would count as 1 so basically a handfull of potatoes

Andre the giant is now crying because his tatties are tasteless :)

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I was never much of a fan of lentils, but there are two dishes which can be distinctly edible.

One is dahl made with split red lentils (or unsplit red lentils if you are prepared to cook it for about three times as long.

Dahl is dead easy and very quick when made with the split red lentils, which cook down in maybe 20 minutes.

Use about 1:4 ratio of lentils to water, bring to a boil and simmer gently until a stew develops.

Add spices to taste - lots of garlic, ginger and chili are essential, and tumeric, cinnamon etc are all good.

I can't tell you how much to use, just add and taste.

Also add salt and - this is the big secret - a can of chopped tomatoes toward the end of cooking.

If you don't like/don't have tomatoes, use lemon juice or even tamarind to acidify the dish to your taste.

Make the dahl big and punchy in flavour and serve over rice.

Cheap and tasty.

The other lentils which are genuinely delicious are at the other end of the food spectrum, the little green 'lentils du puy' from France. These are expensive little suckers, but worth it. (There is an Australian version of these which can be good but which are not totally reliable, go for the french if you are trying them for the first time).

These lentils don't go at all mushy, they remain little and round and firm-ish and can be eaten as a salad or as a side dish.

To cook them, boil them gently for about half an hour (or more - I think they take longer if they have been stored for a while), and they are done to your taste.

Drain and rinse them and then dress them with salt, lemon juice and olive oil.

The proportions are totally up to you.

If you want them as a salad, serve them cold, dressed as above but a bit more generously, with the addition of a little chopped onion or minced garlic.

They are lentils but not as we know them - give them a try if you get the chance.

Looking at this makes me think that it might be the acid that makes the difference between an average lentil and a delicious one - but I don't know as I still basically mistrust lentils except for these two recipes!

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I was never much of a fan of lentils, but there are two dishes which can be distinctly edible.

One is dahl made with split red lentils (or unsplit red lentils if you are prepared to cook it for about three times as long.

Dahl is dead easy and very quick when made with the split red lentils, which cook down in maybe 20 minutes.

Use about 1:4 ratio of lentils to water, bring to a boil and simmer gently until a stew develops.

Add spices to taste - lots of garlic, ginger and chili are essential, and tumeric, cinnamon etc are all good.

I can't tell you how much to use, just add and taste.

Also add salt and - this is the big secret - a can of chopped tomatoes toward the end of cooking.

If you don't like/don't have tomatoes, use lemon juice or even tamarind to acidify the dish to your taste.

Make the dahl big and punchy in flavour and serve over rice.

Cheap and tasty.

The other lentils which are genuinely delicious are at the other end of the food spectrum, the little green 'lentils du puy' from France. These are expensive little suckers, but worth it. (There is an Australian version of these which can be good but which are not totally reliable, go for the french if you are trying them for the first time).

These lentils don't go at all mushy, they remain little and round and firm-ish and can be eaten as a salad or as a side dish.

To cook them, boil them gently for about half an hour (or more - I think they take longer if they have been stored for a while), and they are done to your taste.

Drain and rinse them and then dress them with salt, lemon juice and olive oil.

The proportions are totally up to you.

If you want them as a salad, serve them cold, dressed as above but a bit more generously, with the addition of a little chopped onion or minced garlic.

They are lentils but not as we know them - give them a try if you get the chance.

Looking at this makes me think that it might be the acid that makes the difference between an average lentil and a delicious one - but I don't know as I still basically mistrust lentils except for these two recipes!

I like dhal with some darkly fried onions added when serving. The onions should be like you get with someone cooking them on a hot bbq. A bit blackened but not burned.

I agree about the puy lentils - classic french and great for using as a bed for serving meat on. Yum.

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...Looking at this makes me think that it might be the acid that makes the difference between an average lentil and a delicious one - but I don't know as I still basically mistrust lentils except for these two recipes!

This is an interesting observation and may well explain my distrust of the lentil.

I am doing an indian style dinner (well trying to replicate some indian takeaway food) in the near future. Might just give your idea a go.

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I quite like Lentils as a base for soup, I like the flavour they add, and they are really filling as well, pity about the methane problem afterwoods, otherwise I'd eat them a lot more. So cheap & healthy.

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I love lentils. Homemade lentil soup served with vinegar, frankfurters and mustard is what I grew up with. A favourite of mine you rarely get to enjoy is cow tongue as sliced meat. Pig's tongue will do.

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Quick & tasty Asian:

Put a bowl of bean sprouts for 1 min on low power in the microwave.

Put lots of soy sauce on the warm microwaved bean sprouts.

Add wasabi to taste.

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Can't remember if I posted this already ...

Student food:

2 minute noodles, preferably an Asian flavour, cooked as per packet directions

1 egg, fried, cut up into bits

Spring onions or silverbeet or sprouts or any random green vegetable

Combine. Eat.

Did you know you can sprout lentils? Great for this dish.

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Can't remember if I posted this already ...

Student food:

2 minute noodles, preferably an Asian flavour, cooked as per packet directions

1 egg, fried, cut up into bits

Spring onions or silverbeet or sprouts or any random green vegetable

Combine. Eat.

Did you know you can sprout lentils? Great for this dish.

You can sprout those split red or green dried lentils?

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Winter shared house student food for sh*tty electric stove tops.

1. Find a big (say 20L) heavy pot. New these will run from $50 - $100

Make a potato curry.

Fry some onions, garlic and chilli (say 10 onions, a head of garlic and a handful of chillis (not an andre the giant handful unless you are frisky)

Fry a whole tub of mae ploy green curry paste into it (one of the big ones).

Dump the mess in the pot, you'll probably have to do 2 or 3 batches.

Add water, maybe 10 litres

If you are rich add a couple tins of cocunit milk and or cream, maybe even spring for chicken stock.

Throw in maybe 3 or 4 peeled and chunked sweet potatoes, a bag of baby potatoes (if you're rich) or a kilo of peeled sebago (the dirty ones, $2 a kilo).

You now have a basic curry. Leave it on low for the next 6 months.

Whenever you want to eat some fry some Fish, chicken or beef or something and throw it into a seperate pot and top it up with content from the big pot. Or be lazy and chuck it in the big pot and try to fish out the tasty bits later, this route big chunks of meat or chicken are best as they are easier to find, this is a more advanced method as you can easily bugger the whole pot of food.

Each morning throw a little more stock in there to make sure it doesn't boil while at lectures or drinking.

Each night put rice into your rice cooker (off) with water, when you get home it will be almost cooked, drain the water, add fresh water and salt and turn it on, rice is ready in like 5 minutes.

Each weekend rebuild your big pot contents by frying more stuff and throwing it in.

When this routine gets going and everyone in the household is down with it you end up getting some interesting curries. A few months in and all the original potatoes that didn't get eaten have become a thickening agent. The sweet potato leaches the flavours from the paste and is a guaranteed mouthful of flavour.

We were all either time poor or money poor, this meant that the guys with cash could pay for stuff and the guys with time could cook stuff with close to zero effort.

The weekly rebuild of the curry pot means that ideas which were a little creative get muted out pretty quickly without having to throw the food away. Mostly we did "exciting new ideas" on thursday nights as friday we were usually either drunk or tired enough to eat anything and so thursday was the last night you'd have to eat it if it sucked.

And it really is surprising how many interesting and quite different things can come out of it.

The big bonus is that there is always food when you get home and (assuming no one does anything too dumb) there is no wastage as you go out and buy your veges and paste each saturday and rebuild and you are done, nothing to waste space in the fridge which has more noble things to store.

The other bonus is whenever you get home it smells like food.

The chances of botulism are probably very high, none of us seemed to get it.

Edit: sh*t just remembered, one of the guys worked down at Paddy in the city and would always ring home stacks of crappy veges to toss in the pot which cost us nothing. I particularly liked sunday nights when that chinese vege with the stems kind of like broccolini was fresh and crunchy.

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COCONUT RICE WITH BEANS

I'd say that recipe is very similar to 'Rice n' Peas', Jamacian style but with less coconut.

Love it with Jamaican Fried Chicken and salad.

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I'd say that recipe is very similar to 'Rice n' Peas', Jamacian style but with less coconut.

Love it with Jamaican Fried Chicken and salad.

Which is made how?

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Which is made how?

I have no special Jamaican/Carribean fried chicken recipe to share.

Although this from my supposedly authentic 'Carribean Cookbook' by Rita G Springer.

Carribean Fried Chicken

Marinade for 2 - 3 pounds of chicken:

1 1/2 tbsp salt

2 tsp sugar

2 tbsp malt vinegar

1 onion

2 tbsp rum

1 tsp paprika

1 tsp chilli or black pepper

1/2 tsp celery salt

1 clove garlic

1 tbsp soy sauce

Marinade meat, with above ingredients for 1 hour.

Drain and dredge in seasoned flour and allow to stand for a bit.

Seasoned Flour (enough for several dishes - can save and store in air tight jar)

1 cup flour

1 tsp salt

1 tsp blk or white pepper

1 tsp powdered cloves

1/2 tsp salt

1 tbsp sugar

1 tsp paprika

2 tsp seasoning or gourmet powder (no idea what this is?!)

Fry in hot fat, on both sides till brown. Add a little water, cover and steam for about 30 minutes till tender or cover and finish in oven.

I haven't made this yet so can't give you a verdict.

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I love lentils. Homemade lentil soup served with vinegar, frankfurters and mustard is what I grew up with. A favourite of mine you rarely get to enjoy is cow tongue as sliced meat. Pig's tongue will do.

Mmm! Cow's tongue is delicious. Never tried pigs tongue - how do you cook it?

Unfortunately cow's tongue has become both hard to find and over priced, at least in my part of the world. If you can get a smoked cow's tongue, I cook it much as you would corned beef, for quite a long time - say two hours, at a low simmer, in water lightly seasoned with vinegar, pepper, a little brown sugar, elderly carrots, celery tops etc. Cool it but don't let it get cold. Throw out the vegetable seasonings as they have usually turned to mush. The broth can be used for soup if you feel like it - a variation on pea and ham works well as it is strongly flavoured. It would probably do a great job as a base for your lentil soup.

The trick with tongue is peeling it before it gets cold - stay with me here!, it is less gross than it sounds and the tongue is genuinely really tasty. Gently peel off the skin while it is tepid, from the thick end of the tongue to the thin. Discard the skin, it is bristly (remember being licked by a cow as a kid? - That's why!). What remains is a smooth chunk of rich and tasty meat, best chilled and sliced very finely for sandwiches, or eaten shredded (warm) with your choice of starch.

Fantastic fuel in winter, but sadly totally inappropriate for summer, IMO.

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