tor

The Mandatory recipe Thread

1013 posts in this topic

Leftover pork makes nice sandwiches.

Or, today for lunch (since someone bought 2 minute noodles) you cut it up into bits, maybe a cut-up fried egg too, and fry it up with some random veggies like spring onions and chuck it in with the plain 2 minute noodles and some of your favourite sauce. Which will probably be plum sauce. But if you get the asian style ones you can use the sauce that comes with.

Actually today is pancake for lunch day.

Yeah negi miso ramen is normal old ramen noodles in a chicken broth with miso so it goes cloudy with slices of pork. Often you chuck corn kernels and some green bits in there (including long thin bit of spring onion) and my favourite condiment is chilli oil which floats around in lovely little red globules. a popular addition in some circles is a really soft boiled egg.

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Wildebeest Rissoles

Makes 12 rissoles.

1 teaspoon oil, for pan-frying vegetables

1 small onion, finely chopped

1 small zucchini, grated

1 small carrot, grated

2 medium garlic cloves, crushed

500g lean Wilderbeest mince

3 tbsp dry breadcrumbs

40g grated tasty cheddar cheese

1/4 teaspoon salt

Pepper, to taste

1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce

1 tablespoon tomato paste

1 large egg

1 tablespoon oil, for pan-frying Wilderbeest rissoles

***

Fry off onion, zucchini and carot until softened, add garlic and fry for 5 mins.

Cool veggies and add other ingredients. Make into 12 patties and fry in oil until golden brown.

Bon Appetit!

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do you pre boil the tatties and shake them to rough up the edges?

Absolutely the best method. Add sunflower oil salt and white pepper and shake about. (Thanks Delia Smith for this tip)

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Wildebeest Rissoles

Makes 12 rissoles.

1 teaspoon oil, for pan-frying vegetables

1 small onion, finely chopped

1 small zucchini, grated

1 small carrot, grated

2 medium garlic cloves, crushed

500g lean Wilderbeest mince

3 tbsp dry breadcrumbs

40g grated tasty cheddar cheese

1/4 teaspoon salt

Pepper, to taste

1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce

1 tablespoon tomato paste

1 large egg

1 tablespoon oil, for pan-frying Wilderbeest rissoles

***

Fry off onion, zucchini and carot until softened, add garlic and fry for 5 mins.

Cool veggies and add other ingredients. Make into 12 patties and fry in oil until golden brown.

Bon Appetit!

We don't have any Wildebeest in Canberra. Can I use dinosaurs? (aka liberals)

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Absolutely the best method. Add sunflower oil salt and white pepper and shake about. (Thanks Delia Smith for this tip)

No flour?

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No flour?

Not in the spuds. But that would make them almost battered? Add a few spices in the flour and you would have spicy wedges.

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Not in the spuds. But that would make them almost battered? Add a few spices in the flour and you would have spicy wedges.

I have always tossed them in a bag with flour, salt and pepper straight before putting them in the oven. I have never tried oil on the potatoes except the pan juices you are dropping them into, they are wet after peeling anyway so the flour stocks to them.

It is not a thick batter but a dusting of flour just ensures you crisp the outside of them.

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BBQ freezing: Dietetic, frugal, feeds the kids, saves time, saves money, keeps everyone happy.

I use the BBQ 3~4 times a week preparing the family dinner (reasons: it's healthier, tastier & easier than any other method of preparation). Usually there is more meat than a family of 5 can devour - it gets immediately frozen in sandwich bags.

On the days when there is no time/energy to prepare dinner, or if one of the kids decides that he wants something else I have an immediate backup in the freezer. Variety of frozen BBQed meats that usually answers any whims of the kids.

When frozen immediately after dinner, and heated in the microwave before consumption, it retains the original flavour & smell even a month after freezing, as it was freshly cooked. Well, almost.

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Simple to prepare & delicious!

Marinated lamb backstrap

Nice,

reminds me of the food I would get at an afghan resteraunt in Dandenong I would drive across Melbourne to eat at except in stead of being cooked on a barbecue it was cooked over hot rocks.

Yeh MElbourne definitely has the value food choices, the meal I could get in Dandy would probably cost me $40.00 here south of Perth. Good thing at least rents are cheap down here....

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I made biscuits last night for the class party today - decided to try something new and untested off the internet, as you do ...

They turned out really, REALLY nice. I like it when Google actually delivers the goods.

113 grams butter (that's a stick in yank-speak)

1/2 cup brown sugar

1/2 cup white sugar

1 egg

3/4 cup peanut butter - that's the bulk of one of those small jars

1 1/4 cups plain flour

1/2 tsp baking soda

1/2 tsp vanilla essense

Mix butter, sugar and peanut butter together. Add eggs, flour, baking soda and vanilla extract.

I made them into 1 inch balls and squished them down a bit with a fork (child says "what are those lines?")

Bake at 180C for about 12 minutes or until golden brown.

It made 3 dozen, and they were incredibly delicious but I don't have enough peanut butter left to make more :(

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I made biscuits last night for the class party today - decided to try something new and untested off the internet, as you do ...

I am a fan of not fully cooking biscuits. I tell my wife to get half out when they are half cooked still a bit soft in the middle, they harden up a bit as they cool anyway.

I am preparing myself now for old age when I start loosing my teeth.

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Salads. Man they suck!

In my cooking skills I have a small list of stuff I just can't do to even a remote level of satisfactoriness (apparently firefox thinks that is a real word, didn't expect that).

Stir Fries

Salads

Desserts

Pretty much in that order, there are exceptions, I can apparently make an excellent honey ice cream and my fried rice has been requested. Mostly though when I see these types of cooking in a recipe book I just skip the chapter. I don't have the feel for them and feel like I am cooking to a recipe rather than knowing what I am doing and cooking to an idea. I hate that. Makes cooking boring.

Anyway this post is related to salads, which I don't mind eating but feel pretty incompetent at making in general.

Many people feel that when you have a hot day you shouldn't have mashed potato (which I can make like a champion, I have 3 distinct versions) and braised meat in a tasty sauce. So I have eventually worked up a couple of salads. One will fit the situation or someone else has to make the salad (greek salads are made by the girlfriend, she is good at that one especially). My salads are:

1. Potato Salad; Good in autumn type meals, not super heavy but substantial served warm. Good for the heaped table of food with a bunch of people picking t everything.

2. KFC style coleslaw; A slight improvement on the current KFC coleslaw, I think it is like the KFC coleslaw I remember as a kid, awesome with southern US style smoked barbecue.

3. Chinese Cabbage coleslaw; peanuts and garlic with crunch, light and vinegary. Excellent with australian BBQ meat.

4. CousCous and Bean salad; parsley and beans. Quite a fresh flavour. Good beside braised meats or on a roll.

5. Japanese noodle salad; I only serve this with my Australian BBQ cooked Soy Honey chicken really.

6. Mushrooms grecque; tasty rolls (maybe a cheese and olive pull apart from bakers delight) and a bottle of red in the summer (wins me mega points with my mum)

I am planning the food for a (rare) family gathering on boxing day where I will be doing my pulled pork, a smoked chicken, cold roast beef, some honey and soy chicken (wing form) so I will be doing the KFC knock off, the chinese cabbage and maybe one or two of the others.

Any interest in the recipes for any of these salads? Posting the lot in one hit would be a patented "tor hits you with a wall for text for 17 damage"

Any awesome salads anyone has?

Hey while I am thinking of it, Sam why don't you guys have recipe cards like at the fruit and vege places? You could have the recipes for something that goes really good with a specific roll or loaf or something.

I love those cards and have often bought stuff just to try a recipe out for a bit of something new. Most are merely acceptable food but the occasional thing is great and gets a replay.

Edit: Sam, not Tom. Although may cook he is not one of those evil bread types.

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Salads. Man they suck!

In my cooking skills I have a small list of stuff I just can't do to even a remote level of satisfactoriness (apparently firefox thinks that is a real word, didn't expect that).

Stir Fries

Salads

Desserts

Pretty much in that order, there are exceptions, I can apparently make an excellent honey ice cream and my fried rice has been requested. Mostly though when I see these types of cooking in a recipe book I just skip the chapter. I don't have the feel for them and feel like I am cooking to a recipe rather than knowing what I am doing and cooking to an idea. I hate that. Makes cooking boring.

Anyway this post is related to salads, which I don't mind eating but feel pretty incompetent at making in general.

Many people feel that when you have a hot day you shouldn't have mashed potato (which I can make like a champion, I have 3 distinct versions) and braised meat in a tasty sauce. So I have eventually worked up a couple of salads. One will fit the situation or someone else has to make the salad (greek salads are made by the girlfriend, she is good at that one especially). My salads are:

1. Potato Salad; Good in autumn type meals, not super heavy but substantial served warm. Good for the heaped table of food with a bunch of people picking t everything.

2. KFC style coleslaw; A slight improvement on the current KFC coleslaw, I think it is like the KFC coleslaw I remember as a kid, awesome with southern US style smoked barbecue.

3. Chinese Cabbage coleslaw; peanuts and garlic with crunch, light and vinegary. Excellent with australian BBQ meat.

4. CousCous and Bean salad; parsley and beans. Quite a fresh flavour. Good beside braised meats or on a roll.

5. Japanese noodle salad; I only serve this with my Australian BBQ cooked Soy Honey chicken really.

6. Mushrooms grecque; tasty rolls (maybe a cheese and olive pull apart from bakers delight) and a bottle of red in the summer (wins me mega points with my mum)

I am planning the food for a (rare) family gathering on boxing day where I will be doing my pulled pork, a smoked chicken, cold roast beef, some honey and soy chicken (wing form) so I will be doing the KFC knock off, the chinese cabbage and maybe one or two of the others.

Any interest in the recipes for any of these salads? Posting the lot in one hit would be a patented "tor hits you with a wall for text for 17 damage"

Any awesome salads anyone has?

Hey while I am thinking of it, Sam why don't you guys have recipe cards like at the fruit and vege places? You could have the recipes for something that goes really good with a specific roll or loaf or something.

I love those cards and have often bought stuff just to try a recipe out for a bit of something new. Most are merely acceptable food but the occasional thing is great and gets a replay.

Edit: Sam, not Tom. Although may cook he is not one of those evil bread types.

Wouldn't mind seeing the KFC coleslaw recipe. As a part of another dish I do (Kong po chicken) the first step is to deep fry some chicken in corn flour (4 Tbsp) for 500 grms chicken. 1 tsp salt and 1/2 tsp of chinese five spice. Shake ingredients in a bag to fully cover then deep fry until cooked. It ends up tasting a bit like KFC.

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Wouldn't mind seeing the KFC coleslaw recipe. As a part of another dish I do (Kong po chicken) the first step is to deep fry some chicken in corn flour (4 Tbsp) for 500 grms chicken. 1 tsp salt and 1/2 tsp of chinese five spice. Shake ingredients in a bag to fully cover then deep fry until cooked. It ends up tasting a bit like KFC.

Well this is an easy one if you have one of those V slicer dealy's otherwise it takes forever.

1 cup Mayonnaise

1/2 cup Buttermilk

1/2 cup Milk

2/3 cup Raw Sugar

3 TBSP White Vinegar

5 TBSP Lemon Juice

1 Carrot

1/2 Savoy Cabbage

1 tsp Salt

1/2 tsp ground pepper

Make dressing by combining the lot in a big old bowl and stirring so the sugar breaks up the mayo. Doesn't have to be super smooth but spend a couple of minutes getting it mixed.

Cut cabbage and carrot into bits the size of rice grains.

Add to dressing, add salt and pepper

Refrigerate at least 6 hours but really leave it for a day.

The cabbage to carrot ratio is a personal thing, you want to look at it and be happy.

The actual amount of cabbage is also personal I always like the dressing and the cabbage to look slightly dry in the bowl until you press with a spoon or something then the liquidity is obvious. So like you look at it and the top is all cabbage and carrot but as soon as you touch it there is plenty of liquid.

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Cheers Tor - I'l give a go.

If you have one of those mezzaluna (moon) knives it makes things a bunch easier.

You V slice the cabbage and carrot then finish it off with the mezzaluna.

Be warned you get a bunch of coleslaw, fortunately this has never been a problem :)

With your chicken does it look like KFC? That batter they have is revolting to think of in almost any other scenario but kind of required for a decent KFC knockoff

I have never tried to knock off their chicken. I only eat it once a year while watching bathhurst after training and it is not really the time to be be trying new knockoffs (family traditions lead to pain when you bugger them up). Probably a handy thing to have lying around in your repertoire though.

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If you have one of those mezzaluna (moon) knives it makes things a bunch easier.

You V slice the cabbage and carrot then finish it off with the mezzaluna.

Be warned you get a bunch of coleslaw, fortunately this has never been a problem :)

With your chicken does it look like KFC? That batter they have is revolting to think of in almost any other scenario but kind of required for a decent KFC knockoff

I have never tried to knock off their chicken. I only eat it once a year while watching bathhurst after training and it is not really the time to be be trying new knockoffs (family traditions lead to pain when you bugger them up). Probably a handy thing to have lying around in your repertoire though.

Got both a mezzaluna and a mandolin so no probs there. I think your right that leaving the slaw in the fridge to marinate improves it.

The chicken doesn't really look much like KFC. It's chopped into smaller pieces and has no bones. More like nuggets. I use breast meat nowadays (used to use thighs which you can cook for longer without drying out the meat and can get more colour on when frying) Both are good and much healthier than actual KFC. I guarantee you won't get any complaints. ;) If you want to try southern fried chicken

has a pretty good recipe and some useful tips for frying. I like the tip about putting a drop of water into the oil you are frying in when cold so when it starts to pop you know the oil is almost hot enough. Also you can "listen" to the sound the chicken makes to determine when it is cooked.

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Yorkshire Pudding goes great with a roast (especially Lamb or Beef)

Just look at those little guys, crunchy and moist all at the same time...

roast-beef-and-yorkshire-pudding-by-robbie-jim-flickr.jpg

· 3 tablespoon plain flour (sieved)

· Teaspoon of Salt

· Add 2 eggs

· Milk to make runny

· Little bit of cold water

· Butter/Fat/juice from the roasting tray

Half hour before the roast is done:

Sieve the flour

chuck in the salt and the eggs then whisk

Add milk till its runny and then some cold water

get yourself a muffin tin or even a big flat cake tin but make sure you get plenty of pan juices in there from the roasting tray, a teaspoon each muffin hole (or whatever you like to call them) will do.

Put em in the oven then watch them rise and go all golden - should be done when the roast is ready.

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Well I'm a crap cook (though I still enjoy cooking, it's just painful for my family when they have to eat my... creations...) but since it is mandatory i will slap down a fairly simple and useful recipe for sushi meshi (sushi rice) for homemade hand-rolled sushi (temaki sushi).

its absurdly easy, providing you have a rice cooker, and 1/10th the store price (and much better)

for 4 people you will need...

3 cups rice (medium grain - definitely not long grain. try for japanese-style rice at your local asian grocer - it makes a difference)

3 1/3 c water

1 T sake (doesn't have to be good stuff, but if you are planning on sampling while you "cook" (a la tor) you might want to invest in something halfway decent - cheap sake gives a godawful hangover)

4.5T rice vinegar

3T sugar

2tsp salt

first step, take out your rice cooker. if you don't have one this is now your second step, your first step now being to go to aldi and buy a rice cooker. get one with a hinged lid (not the glass lid that sits atop). its important that there be a good seal to lock in ye olde steame.

dump the rice in the rice cooker bowl and wash it. washing it=running cold water over it while kneading it (sorta) to rid it of any remaining nutrients it for 3-5 mins. the water will turn white as you do it (if it doesn't, knead it harder). when you are done drain the dirty water (or make your younger sibling drink it) and rinse the rice a couple of times before pouring the 3 1/3C water and the sake in with the rice. Let it sit for about an hour BEFORE you turn on the rice cooker - this is important. if you don't let it sit the rice won't get to the right texture.

after an hour's impatient waiting, fire up the rice cooker and let it cook. obviously, don't open the rice cooker while it's cooking (losing steam=al dente rice=bad). when it's done dump the rice into a big bowl. use your rice paddle (surely the rice cooker will come with one? if not a sturdy non-wooden spoon (rice will stick to the wooden ones like nobody's business) will suffice. stir in the vinegar, sugar and salt. Now this is the silly but necessary bit. you have to keep stirring & cutting into the rice with the spoon/paddle while fanning the rice to cool it for 3-5 mins. use a paper fan, newspaper, anything you like. i suppose an electric fan will do but for some reason i don't like the thought (i just imagine all the crap stuck to the fan guard being blown into the rice) why is this necessary? i've never asked (i find married life is easier if you don't ask too many questions) but i am guessing it is probably necessary if you don't want all the moisture to get trapped in the rice, something that will necessarily result in soggy sushi - nobody wants soggy sushi.

that's basically it. then just get your sheets of dried seaweed (nori) cut into squares, your wasabi (tell your friends its avocado, they'll think its hilarious), soy sauce and sushi toppings. living in canberra i shy away from so-called "fresh" raw fish but you who live closer to the sea might feel braver than i. anyway, just slap some rice down the middle of the seaweed square, add your favorite toppings, roll it up, dip in wasabi/soy sauce and you are on your way. i suppose you could roll up the sushi and stick it in the fridge for future consumption if you like but only if you don't mind soggy seaweed. the nice thing about rolling it as you eat it is that you get the warm rice, cold toppings and crisp seaweed all together at the same time. yum... i'm getting hungry.

we do this about once a month with the kiddies, cucumbers, tuna-mayo, korean-style bbq'd beef (bulgogi), fermented soybeans (natto--only for the truly twisted), kim chee, etc. all make for good toppings. cheap and tasty.

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cheap and tasty.

So true!

We do this as a family pretty often too - same general principles, except that as big eaters and fans of 'day old sushi' for lunch the next day (better than it sounds!!) we double quantities of everything...

Favourite fillings are smoked salmon (picked up this habit when we lived up the road from a smoked salmon factory - I kid you not- where a couple of bucks would get you 250gm of 'trimmings' which were exactly the same as the expensive stuff except in more ragged pieces. We bought in bulk and froze the packs, it turns out it freezes very well) and tuna mayonnaise, which is high quality oil packed tuna drained and mixed with a small amount of mayo and some sriracha or other hot sauce. Both avoid the fresh fish problem, which can be an issue here, too.

I've got the whole process down now and find that it is a luxury that you can indulge in even at the ends of the earth - I'm thinking of a particular fairly rural posting I had a few years ago. With a bit of rice and nori and whatever in your luggage you're good to go, anywhere there is (approximately) a kitchen.

BTW, I actually knew a kid who mistook wasabi for mashed avocado. He was four at the time and a handful (typical American brat, a proto-jock) - he launched himself at it and ate it before his mother could intervene. The results were not pretty (or quiet) and he never much liked either wasabi or avocado afterwards, altho he was fine about japanese food in general.

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...fermented soybeans (natto--only for the truly twisted)..

WRONG WRONG WRONG :)

(good recipe though, useful tips on rice I shall try out, never get rice the way I like it, japanese and indian seem the hardest for me)

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WRONG WRONG WRONG :)

(good recipe though, useful tips on rice I shall try out, never get rice the way I like it, japanese and indian seem the hardest for me)

natto is foul, foul stuff. wife and kids love it, i have to leave the room when they eat it... ugh.

sashimi just means sliced raw fish. if you slap it on a rectangle of sushi rice (pref with a bit of wasabi) it becomes sushi. but as RE says, you don't need raw fish for it to be sushi.

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