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RumpledElf

A woodland house

16 posts in this topic

I really quite like that, and I'm very interested in the retrospective way they get planning permission for building it. I'll have to see if there is anything similar in australian planning legislation.

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Very nice, very rustic.

I like the recycled materials aspect, and the relatively low man-hours used to make (create?) it.

However the cynic in me wonders about the chances of it flooding/suffering severe seepage from being built into a hill like that, in merrie olde England where the rainfall and soil moisture are both on the high side.

Ditto plastic sheeting roof - It would not have a very long lifespan. But then, it would not take that much cost or effort to replace, either.

Twenty years ago I might have gone and given it a go myself, but now I think I am too fond of indoor plumbing...

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It's like a saxon round house. I may have mentioned it before but I want an underground house. I want a garden on my roof and good insulation. I'm am of course a wizard rather than a hobbit.

Edited by staringclown

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It is certainly the spiritual brother to a roundhouse.

I thought the saxons used thick thatch for their roofs, rather than sod though?

But if thatch is thick enough I think it becomes a moot point anyway, as the thatch starts to grow it's own pasture.

Some of the roundhouses were very big. Saxons were very loyal to their architecture and took it to it's limits in terms of structural diameter and height.

No windows though, or chimneys - I have always wondered if the theory that the smoke only came down 'so far and no further' was true, or if they all died young of camp-fire induced lung cancer. I bet it kept the mice out of the thatch, though.

An underground house would be cool, though, in all senses.

Rumour has it that there are a number of WTSHTF bolt-holes scattered throughout the Adelaide Hills, along with a couple of 're-purposed' mines, or maybe rail tunnels, depending on who you talk to.

I know the location of one, but have never managed to wangle a look inside. I'm betting they wouldn't have the style of the one RE found, though!

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It is certainly the spiritual brother to a roundhouse.

I thought the saxons used thick thatch for their roofs, rather than sod though?

But if thatch is thick enough I think it becomes a moot point anyway, as the thatch starts to grow it's own pasture.

Some of the roundhouses were very big. Saxons were very loyal to their architecture and took it to it's limits in terms of structural diameter and height.

No windows though, or chimneys - I have always wondered if the theory that the smoke only came down 'so far and no further' was true, or if they all died young of camp-fire induced lung cancer. I bet it kept the mice out of the thatch, though.

An underground house would be cool, though, in all senses.

Rumour has it that there are a number of WTSHTF bolt-holes scattered throughout the Adelaide Hills, along with a couple of 're-purposed' mines, or maybe rail tunnels, depending on who you talk to.

I know the location of one, but have never managed to wangle a look inside. I'm betting they wouldn't have the style of the one RE found, though!

Interestingly the scottish equivalent are called "black" houses. Because of the soot that would accumulate due to the open fire. The fire would heat the family and the animals in the stable in the other half of the house. They are rectangular though. (with thatched roofs) There's an island off scotland called St Kilda, They evacuated the entire place during the WWII but they had very rudimentary lifestyle. It's a romantic notion but sometimes when I'm in my cube at work I dream of a simpler time...

I wonder what happened to the roman style of architecture? Under floor heating and huge villas on the sides of gently sloping hills. Extensions performed over generations for centuries. And then abandoned and back to round houses. I suspect the romans were the Bourgeoisie of the day and in times of political trouble people started building on hills again. And built less permanent dwellings. The worlds earliest bursting of a housing bubble?

DIg the house into the side of a hill and fill around it. Big double glazed view at the front would be just the ticket. Maybe a couple of skylights at the back. Magic.

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Good luck getting the plans for this certified here!

Shame really. I think we're over-regulated (tried putting up a simple stock shed on your own land?) and under-regulated (seen the standard of hovel that can be legally rented out?) and that it's more often than not back-arseward.

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Kind of wish they had more detail and pics of the construction process, as it's a bit light on for detail.

What I really like about it, and it's what I really like about those really old towns in the UK & Europe, is the wonky organic nature of the building. Whilst it may be similar to other houses, it's unique, and has a lot of character, rather than the generic mass produced feel of much new housing.

Max, surely if an inspector certifies that it is strong enough, and it meets code, you could build something like that here. Might take some more effort, as councils like any other bureaucracy, don't like dealing with new and different things.

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An underground house would be cool, though, in all senses.

Rumour has it that there are a number of WTSHTF bolt-holes scattered throughout the Adelaide Hills, along with a couple of 're-purposed' mines, or maybe rail tunnels, depending on who you talk to.

I like the idea of repurposing an unused mine, that could be so cool, though the complications may outweigh the benefits.

Anybody know what laws are relevant for building codes (in Victoria)?

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I like the idea of repurposing an unused mine, that could be so cool, though the complications may outweigh the benefits.

Anybody know what laws are relevant for building codes (in Victoria)?

You're not some kind of vampire are you medved? :vampire: Abandoned nuclear bunkers sure but old mines?

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I like the idea of repurposing an unused mine, that could be so cool, though the complications may outweigh the benefits.

Anybody know what laws are relevant for building codes (in Victoria)?

In Coober Peedy they use the underground mines from the opal mines for housing.

slide_4707_65231_large.jpg

The thing is though this area is very arid so your place would be dry. I cannot imagine how you would go in a victorian mine due to the dampness. You would potentially come out from a night in your warm damp house into a cold dry victorian morning and suffer the same fate as the Victorian underground gold miners; pneumonia.

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You're not some kind of vampire are you medved? :vampire: Abandoned nuclear bunkers sure but old mines?

Abandoned nuclear bunkers have an even higher level of cool factor. Only thing is I think mines will be easier to come by. My imagination would certainly enjoy the opportunity to play with a clandestine cave system... an underground labrynth, now that would be cool... :)

93902416_66533f3030.jpg

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A couple of years back there was a RE ad doing the rounds for a cold-war era missile silo in the US somewhere. It was awesome. I'll try to dig it up.

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Abandoned nuclear bunkers have an even higher level of cool factor. Only thing is I think mines will be easier to come by. My imagination would certainly enjoy the opportunity to play with a clandestine cave system... an underground labrynth, now that would be cool... :)

93902416_66533f3030.jpg

Mmm labyrinth. Now you're talking. Secret rooms, traps, mazes and puzzles. The works. The bunker I saw was in Arizona and looked like something out of terminator. You're bunker is far more stylish max. ^_^

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hahah! Those photos demonstrate homes that really are simple and sustainable.

Even so, I don't think I could live in one of those. They really do look like something out of Tolkien, and I may worry about the lack of lighting and air?

I think I'd prefer a simple and sustainable option above ground, rather than a cave-type dwelling.

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