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Mr Medved

Yurts

11 posts in this topic

Anybody considered a yurt for a rural property? I'm not sure how they are treated by councils but they are transportable. I've seen a few in Central Asia and are pretty cool.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yurt

http://www.yurts.com...ts/default.aspx

http://ourhouse.nine...vers/05/557.asp

Would not be considered a permanent structure under most Local Council approvals.

Still, look pretty solid.

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The construction is fascinating - they are effectively held together by a tensioned wire or rope, so there's no walls or other supports inside. You can get really big ones in kit format. I'd imagine it'd be impossible to get one of these approved anywhere urban.

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If these structures were made of inflammable material and set on top of a submerged rain-water tank, I reckon they would make an extremely effective fire bunker for high fire prone areas. They would also be good for longer term accommodation after a cyclone or tsunamai, where tents are normally less effective.

In the event of fires;

The round shape would stop ember embedding.

You could vent air out the centre support without severely jeopardising the integrity of the structure.

If you had a hand or foot pump inside attached to a sprinkler system the entire structure would be easy to keep protected from spontaneous combustion.

I'm actually quite impressed with their strength and integrity.

I doubt though whether you would get Local Councils to approve them for long term living, in either urban or rural settings, without major modifications.

Still good to know such structures exist.

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Yurts are cool. Very Mongolian

I was recently in Mongolia and the Ger (Mongolian word for Yurt) are very groovy. They can be incredibly warm in winter due to the felt and canvas walls, with a small fireplace. In summer they usually lift the felt walls to allow airflow in from the ground level that is then expelled through the central roof hole.

I was quite amazed ant how little there is to them and yet how well structured they appear to be. If I was building a house and needed somewhere to stay on site I would probably go for one - way better than a caravan or tent :)

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...Surprised people don't talk more about yurts here. 

 

They're not favoured as investment properties.  :P

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They're not favoured as investment properties.  :P

 

Well we know the land value rises as opposed to the dwelling. Imagine the depreciation on a yurt. I'll wager you have a yak hide index chart cobran. It must be massive.  :)

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Well we know the land value rises as opposed to the dwelling. Imagine the depreciation on a yurt. I'll wager you have a yak hide index chart cobran. It must be massive.  :)

 

As a matter of fact, I do!  -_-

 

link

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As a matter of fact, I do!  -_-

 

link

 

I'm only now recognising your true brilliance C.  :laugh:

 

Though I will definitely be revisiting my shorts on dragon scales and healing potions. Yak hides are measured in gold pieces and I only have silver.

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