RumpledElf

Energylite

22 posts in this topic

http://www.energylite.com.au/

I think this is a Perth thing, but for all you Westies looking at something a bit different for a house or extension, these guys do panels that are made out of blueboard on the outside, 78mm polystyrene (this is the stuff Eskies are made out of - fantastic insulator) in the middle and gyprock on the inside. Sounds simple but effective.

I'd imagine the outside would be done in acrylic render and wouldn't look much different to any other rendered house.

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http://www.energylite.com.au/

I think this is a Perth thing, but for all you Westies looking at something a bit different for a house or extension, these guys do panels that are made out of blueboard on the outside, 78mm polystyrene (this is the stuff Eskies are made out of - fantastic insulator) in the middle and gyprock on the inside. Sounds simple but effective.

I'd imagine the outside would be done in acrylic render and wouldn't look much different to any other rendered house.

Sounds like a 100mm sheet of esky... Now _that_ would have to be the best ceiling insulator for me.... everyone else seems afraid to do it.

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http://www.energylite.com.au/

I think this is a Perth thing, but for all you Westies looking at something a bit different for a house or extension, these guys do panels that are made out of blueboard on the outside, 78mm polystyrene (this is the stuff Eskies are made out of - fantastic insulator) in the middle and gyprock on the inside. Sounds simple but effective.

I'd imagine the outside would be done in acrylic render and wouldn't look much different to any other rendered house.

there's another comapny out there that do a sheet of colorbond, 100mm esky panel and then another sheet of colorbond.

you etch prime the outside and acrylic render and the inside you fix gyprock to.

best bit is - it's load bearing.

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there's another comapny out there that do a sheet of colorbond, 100mm esky panel and then another sheet of colorbond.

you etch prime the outside and acrylic render and the inside you fix gyprock to.

best bit is - it's load bearing.

Load bearing chilly bins! I knew it, it is like being a uni student all over again, we'll change the world see, what we'll do ios make everything out of chilly bins and milk crates hehehehe

I assume this would as an excellent replacement roof for people with cathedral ceilings which can't use normal insulation types. Do you have a link to their site perchance?

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Would energy lite be any better or more efficient than Hebel?

http://www.hebelaustralia.com.au/whyhebel/thehebelstory.aspx

there's another comapny out there that do a sheet of colorbond, 100mm esky panel and then another sheet of colorbond.

you etch prime the outside and acrylic render and the inside you fix gyprock to.

best bit is - it's load bearing.

Any more info on someone that uses it for housing?

I have thought for a while and mentioned it before on the other forum years ago, that this method of construction would be good for remote communities.

Pre cut flat packed house, several to a truck is a more efficient way to go imho

instead of the half a pre fabricated house on a truck followed by another half a pre fabricated house on a truck going out west that is commonly seen now.

For mining areas, why could they not have Pre cut flat packed houses going back out in empty coal carriages?

massive savings in a/c costs and tightly packed dongas on site would have good sound insullation between them with double wall thicknesses (200mm foam)

Frank

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It might be more energy efficient, you'd have to look into the technical specs.

Hebel is so much more common than the other more obscure things (better or worse) that if you're a bit price sensitive and want an installer without scouring the country for the handful of specialists, you're probably better off with Hebel.

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massive savings in a/c costs and tightly packed dongas on site would have good sound insullation between them with double wall thicknesses (200mm foam)

Frank

The dongas are heavy as modern ones usually have a concrete base buried in the ground to prevent them blowing away during cyclone season. The other option is nailing / screw piling them down but it is expensive and the process has to be repeated each time they are moved, so generally they put them on concrete floors. When they are made that heavy you might as well transport them as completed units as you will only get one or two to a truck whether it is flat packed or fully fabricated prior to transport.

They don't like pouring them on site either as concrete is more than double the Perth metro price up north not to mention the extra placing costs using the mine construction labour as opposed to Perth metro.

Most of the workers were inexperienced with cyclones. They had come from the eastern states of Australia, lured to the region by the prospect of high earnings.

There had been ample time and facilities for FMG to move workers out. One worker said up to 80 vehicles, including trucks, could have transported people out of danger. After the cyclone hit, however, rescue workers could not get to the dying and injured for many hours. Crews had to be flown in when weather conditions improved. Medical teams came from Perth and Karratha.

It has since been revealed that the “dongas” were not cyclone-proof as first claimed by Fortescue’s executive director Andrew Forrest. After attempting to protect the company by declaring, “we only use the best contractors” to install the huts, he refused to verify if they had been designed to withstand a category 5 cyclone.

A worker who had helped administer first aid to the victims, despite his own injuries, described how the dongas were strewn over the site. Medical supplies were also destroyed, forcing him to improvise with makeshift supplies when attending victims. There was no emergency medical unit on the site to cater for cyclones.

Photos taken after the cyclone show that the huts were not even tied down or welded to their bases. To withstand a cyclone of this intensity, huts must be attached to concrete bases buried deep in the ground.

Full article Link:

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This stuff is another variation on the cementboard with 4" of polystyrene attached products that are coming out everywhere -- this one seems to add framing and internal chasing for power somehow, perhaps at the time of order. The other designs simply attach cladding to existing steel or timber framing instead of brick veneer, leaving you to do internal gyprock and wiring/plumbing the usual way -- although this approach would have a slimmer profile (cross-section) because it contains the framing also, so not a bad idea. End result looks like rendered cement on the outside, but a cricket ball will probably break through the outside skin, and someone could probably punch through your house wall with a tyre lever and wander in. artie suggested if you wanted a concrete finish, you may as well design using formwork and a concrete pour using some moulding system that's out there. sound and heat insulation is as good with solid concrete; these polystyrene solutions are good for sound and heat also, and brick veneer or ordinary cladding is the worst without lots of insulation in between the framing...

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but a cricket ball will probably break through the outside skin, and someone could probably punch through your house wall with a tyre lever and wander in.

This is an issue with anything that isn't brick, but it doesn't actually happen all that often. I'm building a fibre cement sheet weatherboard house next year (the strips not huge sheets). There's heaps around here and none are damaged. The ones that are much older with just big sheets of the stuff do tend to get holes bashed in them over time though.

BTW its much easier to stick your arm through an internal wall in a modern house than through fibre cement sheets. Plasterboard is surprisingly fragile. I much prefer my foot thick stone walls, even though they do move a bit and you get funny cracks and things, they are very sound resistant and solid plaster stands up to quite a beating.

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They look like a variation on the American SIPs - Structural Insulated Panels http://www.sips.org/content/index.cfm?pageId=269#Q1

But I think their best use might be as the insulative outer cladding on a reverse brick veneer type design. Agree with tor, could make an excellent insulating roof, with a skin of tiles or colourbond to keep the water off and look pretty.

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They look like a variation on the American SIPs - Structural Insulated Panels http://www.sips.org/...m?pageId=269#Q1

But I think their best use might be as the insulative outer cladding on a reverse brick veneer type design. Agree with tor, could make an excellent insulating roof, with a skin of tiles or colourbond to keep the water off and look pretty.

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Welcome to the forum.

One of the tricks though is that you type into the big white box after you hit reply and before (this is the crucial bit) you click Add Reply :)

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Saw your reference to Structural Insulated Panels.

SIPs are used in many countries, for sustainable housing with huge success, and even in current downturn in housing in US, is a growth product, as the need for sustainable building becomes more understood. Huge growth of SIPs application in building has taken place in the UK, since the Egan Report on housing was released, with SIPs commonly used for a range of applications, in particular for social housing, from single to multi residential buildings, units, townhouses, schools, health care facilities and commercial buildings. Many, many competitions regarding sustainable building, zero energy homes, have seen SIPs used for floors, external walls, internal walls and roofs, producing competition winners, and the highest level of sustainability, according to criteria set.

Your reference to the SIPA site is a very good one. Not only is SIPs strong - no one could hit a hole through it-it is earthquake resistant, hurricane and cyclone 'proof', and has attributes that can not be argued in terms of suitability for sustainable building.

We have built homes, using R Control SIPs panels in Australia, in a number of states. We hold the licence to manufacture R Control SIPs for both the Australian and New Zealand market, and manufacturing is due to commence of the panel early 2010 in New South Wales.

Engineered lumber is increasing in popularity as the price of steel and lumber increases, for its strength, durability, and long term sustainability. We have built using SIPs with other products, such as Hebel, demonstrating its versatility. Great for retrofits and extensions too. SIPs applications are endless, with a variety of thicknesses, sizes, and R Values available to suit conditions. SIPs has been used from Antarctica to Texas and Arizona, demonstrating its suitability for hot and cold climates, and is being used to help rebuild in places such as Greensburg and in New Orleans after Cyclone Katrina, because of its proven success in buildings constructed from it, remaining intact after severe conditions.

It is used for indigenous housing, as it is culturally appropriate, social housing, as it has long term sustainabity and cuts energy costs markedly, and for the finest of architecturally designed homes, able to be used on difficult terrains, where traditional construction would be costly. There are few, if any, design constraints, using SIPs panels.

The website, for anyone interested in new technology available to the market (not new, used for over 30 years - but an invigorated interest now - with focus on sustainability) but in its infancy and now available in Australia and New Zealand is:

http://www.au.rcontrol.com

Pat Davies

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The website, for anyone interested in new technology available to the market (not new, used for over 30 years - but an invigorated interest now - with focus on sustainability) but in its infancy and now available in Australia and New Zealand is:

http://www.au.rcontrol.com

Pat Davies

Pat,

Thanks for the site reference. Do you have the design tables in Metric as well as imperial? Most of us go on metric here and while we are capable of converting it, might help the sites Australian feel if you had them in metric?

Anyway good to have a resident expert to throw questions about SIPS at. I see you are located in Welshpool in WA, is most of the Australian demand coming from WA thus far?

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Pat,

Thanks for the site reference. Do you have the design tables in Metric as well as imperial? Most of us go on metric here and while we are capable of converting it, might help the sites Australian feel if you had them in metric?

Anyway good to have a resident expert to throw questions about SIPS at. I see you are located in Welshpool in WA, is most of the Australian demand coming from WA thus far?

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Check the website again. The metric conversions are there. There is a manufacturing facility in NSW where the interest and demand has been very high. Ten star home currently under construction - almost finished in Canberra a great model.

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Check the website again. The metric conversions are there. There is a manufacturing facility in NSW where the interest and demand has been very high. Ten star home currently under construction - almost finished in Canberra a great model.

Is that ten star as in energy ratings?

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Is that ten star as in energy ratings?

Yes. The SIP is used for the floor, external and internal walls and roof, thus enabling for a whole thermal envelope. The preliminary blower door test, showed a lower air exchange rate than on any other home they had tested, including modern, recently built, completed, homes in Canberra; and that was a preliminary test, without windows installed or external doors fitted - simply boarded prior to installation. Another test is imminent at time of completion. In addition the window frames, glass, water tanks, and finishes etc, will give it it's ten star rating. Sensors to be applied to the house will monitor temperatures inside and out and the level of energy used for that time. Note that the latest winner of the Solar decathalon in Europe built by Virginia Tech and competing against the best, used standard SIPs for the roof and a vacuum SIP for the walls. The most efficient way to create an energy efficient house, is to have a tight thermal envelope. SIPs does this, and is able to do this on mass, making it certainly a viable building material for the future, with Life Cycle Analysis demonstrating potential savings in energy of up to 60%. It is being utilised by governments in the UK at present for social housing and is a growth industry there. Other attributes, is that it is lightweight, cut to specification in factory (lean building),

able to be erected very, very quickly, allowing other trades onto site to work in conjunction with one another, can be built to three storeys and has excellent sound insulation for use in units where privacy is often questionable. It is cyclone and earthquake 'proof' too, with many cases of a SIPs house being THE house standing after such devastation.

The potential for indigenous housing is enormous, as it requires one experienced carpenter, to supervise the erection to the standard required, using unskilled labour, or a labour force that is on a fast learning curve, enabling individuals to 'specialise' and assist in the building of their own communities. It is also culturally appropriate and extremely, extremely strong. The maintenance of such a home would be dramatically reduced!!! The cost of housing in some of these communities, is not as much the initial cost, but cost of maintenance. The houses, with appropriate designs, with input both ways from local communities, could be THE solution to the overspending and backlog of houses for, in particular, indigenous communities in Australia. An email, written to Jenny Macklin regarding the suitability of the product, nto assist in overcoming the dire need of indigenous communities and housing, was simply discarded, without being read!!!!!

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SIPs are extremely strong. Trees falling on them, projectiles hitting them in storm demonstrate extremely strong envelopes.

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An email, written to Jenny Macklin regarding the suitability of the product, nto assist in overcoming the dire need of indigenous communities and housing, was simply discarded, without being read!!!!!

Very difficult to cut through directly to governmnt.

You really have to go through either a) consultants employed by the government and sell it to them or b. The contractors building the homes.

As your product appears to be benificial in the long term with some additional upfront costs the consultants are where you want to be hitting as the contractors clearly have a job to do and a price agreed so they are not going to go for anything fancy after being awarded the work. Lifecycle cost is of no consequence to a contractor and nor is thermal performance of the panels. Hit the consultants designing these communities if you can.

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Thanks for your feedback.

Have done that - but worked with Government also.

The result is very positive, with a number of units being built with SIPs for the government, who have thoroughly researched each of the sustainable attributes of the panel and made the decision to go with it.

Slowly but surely, with government mandates directing the changes, and the consumer being hit in the pocket with ever increasing energy costs, and legislation evolving to ensure that more efficient homes are built, the consumer is becoming more aware of their investment.

All is looking fantastic for SIPs.

Very difficult to cut through directly to governmnt.

You really have to go through either a) consultants employed by the government and sell it to them or b. The contractors building the homes.

As your product appears to be benificial in the long term with some additional upfront costs the consultants are where you want to be hitting as the contractors clearly have a job to do and a price agreed so they are not going to go for anything fancy after being awarded the work. Lifecycle cost is of no consequence to a contractor and nor is thermal performance of the panels. Hit the consultants designing these communities if you can.

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