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Replication of expensive food

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Home made chinese restaurant stir fry.

This recipe replicates near identically that squidgy chinese restaurant meat.

After a good deal of research I give you chicken with garlic, chilli, spring onions and snow peas

Roughly chop 4 spring onions into 3 cm lengths. Trim the snow peas.

Slice 2 chicken breasts (about 500g) with the grain into 1/4 inch slices. Place in a glass bowl with 1 tsp bicarb soda mixed with a Tbsp water. Mix well and leave for an hour. Wash the chicken mix well until most of the soapyness (you'll know what I mean) has gone. Dry the chicken as much as possible with paper towel. Then marinade 2cloves garlic and three fresh red chillis and 2 tsp soy sauce for at least twenty minutes.

Get a freezer bag and put in 5 Tbsp potato flour. (cornflour will do but use 3 Tbsp)

Heat some oil in a wok (at least 1 inch deep) (Splash a small drop into the cold oil and heat until the water crackles out. ) Shake the chicken mix in the bag to coat the chicken and fry in 3 batches till not quite cooked. (but lightly golden) (You're going to cook it again in a stir fry so almost cooked is good.) Maybe 2 minutes per batch.

Drain the batches on paper.

Drain the oil from the wok and wipe with paper. Pour two Tbsp oil back into wok and on highest heat stirfry the spring onions and snow peas for 1 minute. Add 2 Tsbp chinese wine (or dry sherry) 3 Tbsp oyster sauce and splash light soy. Add some water/stock to thin the mixture before the chicken as the sauce will thicken when you coat the meat with the liquid. I used about 1/2 cup chicken stock. Stir until the mixture is well heated through.

Serve with rice. This is a breakthrough in chinese cooking for me at least. The technique would work with cheaper cuts (just marinade in the baking soda for longer. It is really, really good. :)

chickenGarlicChilliSnowPea.jpg

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Slice 2 chicken breasts (about 500g) with the grain into 1/4 inch slices.

With the grain? So like lengthwise slices?

(You are a bad man also, you make the rest of us lazy sods feel very lazy)

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With the grain? So like lengthwise slices?

(You are a bad man also, you make the rest of us lazy sods feel very lazy)

I cut with the grain only because that's how I get it served at a certain restaurant in canberra (sami's) in a malaysian (hor fun) rice noodle dish (ipoh noodles)

It works with the grain but you're right, I think it would be even more gelatinous cutting perpendicular to the grain. I'll try it next time.

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I cut with the grain only because that's how I get it served at a certain restaurant in canberra (sami's) in a malaysian (hor fun) rice noodle dish (ipoh noodles)

It works with the grain but you're right, I think it would be even more gelatinous cutting perpendicular to the grain. I'll try it next time.

The only way I have got stir fry meat (let's ignore veges and spices) in the right pre masticated fashion is by cutting against the grain and letting them sit in cornflour and water for a bit then hard core frying them on one side only, pulling them out and then re adding later.

but I am willing to try your technique as mine is only so so.

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The only way I have got stir fry meat (let's ignore veges and spices) in the right pre masticated fashion is by cutting against the grain and letting them sit in cornflour and water for a bit then hard core frying them on one side only, pulling them out and then re adding later.

but I am willing to try your technique as mine is only so so.

The only real difference between your current technique and mine is the bicarb soda step. I suspect you can do pretty much anything you usually do after this. Wash out the soda well with water though. The flouring, frying and removing to add later is also key. The floured fried meat soaks up flavour from any sauce/liquid. and thickens the sauce at the same time. I seriously recommend potato flour - it doesn't thicken the sauce near as much as cornflour. I think you could do a longer bicarb marinade for cheap beef cuts (definitely against the grain) flour and steam instead of fry but perhaps spice up the flour coating with some spices and a bit of salt pepper.

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Real fish and chip shop batter is really hard to achieve. I'm not saying it's the best batter. I just want to know whats in it/how it's done. It's pretty obvious that there are none of the best fish and chip shops that are willing to part with their batter recipes as this IS their competitive advantage. There is a standard recipe though because all old time takeaways across various states I've lived in are remarkably similar. My theory is that the recipe for the batter gets sold with the business to maintain the good will.

Last night I tried

1 cup plain flour

1 good pinch salt

1 Tbsp bicarb soda

Enough cold water to make the batter the consistency of thin cream.

The result was good but more like a beer batter than traditional F&CS batter. Anyone ever owned a fish and chip business?

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