urchin

Baking Breads

145 posts in this topic

Had my first go at bread using the Kamado. Pizza actually. Bit of a disaster all told. I can categorically state that 400 degrees centigrade is to hot for cooking pizza. Unless you like your pizza with my all new patented charcoal crusttm and raw on top. urchin has nothing to fear for now. :sadwalk:

I think 400F might have been a better idea :)

Check this for deep dish style:

http://www.eggheadforum.com/index.php?option=com_simpleboard&func=view&id=413864&catid=1

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I think 400F might have been a better idea :)

Check this for deep dish style:

http://www.eggheadforum.com/index.php?option=com_simpleboard&func=view&id=413864&catid=1

Thanks tor. I'm feeling a bit bread shy at the moment and so I'll give the deep pan recipe a go after I've regrouped my bread confidence. (And as soon as I've worked out what a 1/3 cup of EVOO is) The corn meal is interesting.

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Thanks tor. I'm feeling a bit bread shy at the moment and so I'll give the deep pan recipe a go after I've regrouped my bread confidence. (And as soon as I've worked out what a 1/3 cup of EVOO is) The corn meal is interesting.

You gotta watch more cooking shows or read more wanker magazines; EVOO is Extra Virgin Olive Oil.

Took me ages to figure that one out actually then I realised they were saying use a good quality oil to fry sh*t in. pfft. What a waste.

For my money when people say use the best ingredients you can afford they are being stupid.

When I used to make cocktails (in my earlier more wanton years) I figured out very quickly that the real way to people wallets was to use the best that is required.

I am sure if you get some $50 per 100 ml olive oil and chuck it in a fry pan (whether pizza or other) you won't taste a lick of difference from some basic decent spanish oil. I suspect bran oil would probably be better than either.

Look on the bright side though, you just achieved temperatures that are almost double the usual home oven. As a lover of the extreme things (24 hour meals, million degrees and knives you can cut a dream with) I say that knowing you can generate those kind of temperatures has to count as something awesome.

So what if you can't use your super power right yet, you are a superman with awesome powers.

Of course some people find this mode of thinking irrational but their feelings are wrong and stupid.

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You gotta watch more cooking shows or read more wanker magazines; EVOO is Extra Virgin Olive Oil.

Took me ages to figure that one out actually then I realised they were saying use a good quality oil to fry sh*t in. pfft. What a waste.

For my money when people say use the best ingredients you can afford they are being stupid.

When I used to make cocktails (in my earlier more wanton years) I figured out very quickly that the real way to people wallets was to use the best that is required.

I am sure if you get some $50 per 100 ml olive oil and chuck it in a fry pan (whether pizza or other) you won't taste a lick of difference from some basic decent spanish oil. I suspect bran oil would probably be better than either.

Look on the bright side though, you just achieved temperatures that are almost double the usual home oven. As a lover of the extreme things (24 hour meals, million degrees and knives you can cut a dream with) I say that knowing you can generate those kind of temperatures has to count as something awesome.

So what if you can't use your super power right yet, you are a superman with awesome powers.

Of course some people find this mode of thinking irrational but their feelings are wrong and stupid.

ROFLMAO. (And that's the first time I've ever had legitimate cause to use that bullsh*t acronym.)

Yes I felt the power and wondered briefly if I could use it to fire clay. (Or to smelt steel - my own damascus version) There is a boom I hear. :D

For my money when people say use the best ingredients you can afford they are being stupid.

That's exactly the sort of crap that I spout. :wine: I really need to STFU. But to my credit I would never deep fry in EVOO. It's for flavour so salads or dipping bread into with a dash a balsamic vinegar.

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Yes I felt the power and wondered briefly if I could use it to fire clay. (Or to smelt steel - my own damascus version) There is a boom I hear. :D

To get cherry red on iron you need (from memory) about 840 - 850. Cherry red is where you can weld. So you won't be making swords in it. I know. I felt a bit ripped off too. Ont he bright side guys with swords tend to eat under cooked wild meat so I guess we win.

That's exactly the sort of crap that I spout. :wine: I really need to STFU. But to my credit I would never deep fry in EVOO. It's for flavour so salads or dipping bread into with a dash a balsamic vinegar.

I was given a copy of Richard Corrigans book recently. He actually goes so far as to say he wants to slap people over the head for doing such things. I love a guy that can cook and also threatens violence. Oddly this is pretty much every chef I have ever worked with :)

I never got bashed by chefs because I was always happy to forward a bottle of "cooking scotch" to the kitchen. Often I would go and try the sumptuous delight the "cooking scotch" provided. Usually it was something along the lines of "Scotch, served in a glass by a bosomy waitress renowned for her shoe form factor (round heels)".

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To get cherry red on iron you need (from memory) about 840 - 850. Cherry red is where you can weld. So you won't be making swords in it. I know. I felt a bit ripped off too. Ont he bright side guys with swords tend to eat under cooked wild meat so I guess we win.

I was given a copy of Richard Corrigans book recently. He actually goes so far as to say he wants to slap people over the head for doing such things. I love a guy that can cook and also threatens violence. Oddly this is pretty much every chef I have ever worked with :)

I never got bashed by chefs because I was always happy to forward a bottle of "cooking scotch" to the kitchen. Often I would go and try the sumptuous delight the "cooking scotch" provided. Usually it was something along the lines of "Scotch, served in a glass by a bosomy waitress renowned for her shoe form factor (round heels)".

Xmas was always my favourite time. Lots of free floating brandy for fruit mince tarts. And a bit of rum for rum balls. :hug:

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Had my first go at bread using the Kamado. Pizza actually. Bit of a disaster all told. I can categorically state that 400 degrees centigrade is to hot for cooking pizza. Unless you like your pizza with my all new patented charcoal crusttm and raw on top. urchin has nothing to fear for now. :sadwalk:

haha,

but actually 300-350 centigrade is pretty standard i think. thing is, at that temp. it cooks in about 60-90 seconds so you need to be really quick. or at least i would guess. the highest i have been able to get my bbq is 280 degrees or so which is ok but not fantastic.

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haha,

but actually 300-350 centigrade is pretty standard i think. thing is, at that temp. it cooks in about 60-90 seconds so you need to be really quick. or at least i would guess. the highest i have been able to get my bbq is 280 degrees or so which is ok but not fantastic.

My oven runs to about 250 C, but then it is a bit of a bastard and tends to run hot no matter what you do. I'm not sure it is intentional :rolleyes: The pizza is still pretty good, tho.

I still thought it would have come a bad second best to a well handled BBQ; crank it up and see what it can do, Urch!

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My oven runs to about 250 C, but then it is a bit of a bastard and tends to run hot no matter what you do. I'm not sure it is intentional :rolleyes: The pizza is still pretty good, tho.

I still thought it would have come a bad second best to a well handled BBQ; crank it up and see what it can do, Urch!

well i have a crap $169 big W special hooded bbq. nothing special. but actually, now that i am getting used to it, its "quirks" can be turned to one's advantage. it has a highly uneven temperature distribution. this was a pain in the beginning, but now that i know the hot and cold spots i can cook my rare steak and my wife's medium well steak in the same amount of time... convenience!

as far as pizza and breads are concerned, i think the overall thermal mass of the bbq makes it better. popping the lid open doesnt take as much off the temp as a conventional oven (or as my conventional oven). and i have no idea what the actual inside temp is, i doubt my thermometer is very accurate but 550F is about the best i can do... though perhaps in summer it would get hotter. since it says in the manual to not leave the lid down with all four burners going full blast, however, i am a bit leery about pushing the ultimate limits (could prove painful). i think a purpose built oven is the next logical step... xmas present i reckon.

i lust for the gas fired pizza grill they have at bunnings but i'm not willing to buy until i know just how hot i can get it. and so far i haven't found (haven't looked) any reviews.

but my hooded bbq is a $169 big W special so i would hope a purpose built oven would do better (though for 169 it aint a bad deal at all--once you get used to it you can turn the hot and cold spots to your advantage. i can cook my rare steaks and my wife's medium well steaks for the same time now i know where to put em.)

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So SC you heated an entity to the equiv foreign debt of the Commonwealth bank and immolated a pizza.

Did you cook anything?

Hey TP. Sorry for the tardy reply. Work is extracting the last pound of flesh before I leave.

Sometimes the food gods demand a sacrifice. :P

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Kamado pizzas mk2

260 degrees and they were crispy crust.

1st attempt! It aint pretty but I couldn't get it onto the stone as it stuck to the plate. Tasted good though.

post-106-12805646450042_thumb.jpg

2nd attempt!

Much better!

post-106-12805647571577_thumb.jpg

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Kamado pizzas mk2

260 degrees and they were crispy crust.

1st attempt! It aint pretty but I couldn't get it onto the stone as it stuck to the plate. Tasted good though.

2nd attempt!

Much better!

Go man go!

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Kamado pizzas mk2

260 degrees and they were crispy crust.

1st attempt! It aint pretty but I couldn't get it onto the stone as it stuck to the plate. Tasted good though.

post-106-12805646450042_thumb.jpg

2nd attempt!

Much better!

post-106-12805647571577_thumb.jpg

nicely done! try for 280 or even a bit higher if you can swing it... i lay my dough out on floured/cornmealed baking paper first. then after 3-5 mins (when its time to spin it around anyway as my grill has major hot/cold spots) i pull the paper out from under the pizza--comes off without a problem. i had so many issues with it sticking to the peel (no matter how much i floured it) it was driving me nuts. having a very thin dough probably didn't help much either...

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nicely done! try for 280 or even a bit higher if you can swing it... i lay my dough out on floured/cornmealed baking paper first. then after 3-5 mins (when its time to spin it around anyway as my grill has major hot/cold spots) i pull the paper out from under the pizza--comes off without a problem. i had so many issues with it sticking to the peel (no matter how much i floured it) it was driving me nuts. having a very thin dough probably didn't help much either...

I hate peels. I think they are myth put around to snare the gullible. I use cornmeal and use a large flat rectangular baking tray. It takes a kind of swift 'push-pull' motion to get the pizza off the tray onto the stone (in my case), and even then it often goes a bit wonky.

Major kudos to those who can pull it off - If I've had a drink or am in a bad mood it's often safer just to leave the thing on the tray... :D

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I hate peels. I think they are myth put around to snare the gullible. I use cornmeal and use a large flat rectangular baking tray. It takes a kind of swift 'push-pull' motion to get the pizza off the tray onto the stone (in my case), and even then it often goes a bit wonky.

Major kudos to those who can pull it off - If I've had a drink or am in a bad mood it's often safer just to leave the thing on the tray... :D

One guy on the egg forums just dumps the dough (no toppings) onto the stone for a few seconds, flours the top (he might use cornmeal) and then flips it with a big fish slice and adds toppings at that point to the semi cooked top after a quick smear of oil.

I think I tried that once and it worked well.

Since then I got one of those pizza cooker things which I think are like $40. I do basically the same thing in there (pre cook it on one side and flip with a fish slice) and it works out well.

I have to say I mostly eat pizza when all the joy of life has left me and I am a husk of a man. At those points in my life I have a menu from some guys that do a pretty good margerita pizza with garlic and I tend to go that route; I eat 3 or 4 slices and go to sleep.

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nicely done! try for 280 or even a bit higher if you can swing it... i lay my dough out on floured/cornmealed baking paper first. then after 3-5 mins (when its time to spin it around anyway as my grill has major hot/cold spots) i pull the paper out from under the pizza--comes off without a problem. i had so many issues with it sticking to the peel (no matter how much i floured it) it was driving me nuts. having a very thin dough probably didn't help much either...

Paper with lots of flour works a treat. Cheers urchin. :)

Chicken and noodle soup

For when a loved one is poorly.

Bits o chicken. Preferably with bone (and skin) on (you're going to shred the cooked meat later after have straining out the stock)

Method:

OK. Two carrots, two sticks of celery (leaves on) if their fresh. Slice chunky the celery and carrot and one onion. Separate the celery leaves from their stems.

Fry the celery carrots and onion till translucent. Add the chicken bits and fry till browned. If you use drummies then you may have to drain some fat (but it is meant to be restorative).

Add thick sliced ginger a one clove of garlic.

Soak some chinese mushrooms (The whiter their tops the better the quality. Price will reflect this also) in boiling water.

Drain soup. leaving a clear broth. This can be served as is. OR

You can shred the chicken bits, add finely sliced cabbage and the thinly sliced drained mushrooms and the celery leaves and some fresh sliced shallots. Finally some hokkien noodles for the traditional chicken noodle soup.

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Tonight was pizza night. used the regular dough recipe (somewhere on the first page of this thread) but threw a bit of oregano into the mixture just for kicks. turns out it makes absolutely no difference whatsoever. experimented with anchovies in the sauce (turns out i didn't chop them finely enough so, depending on one's luck, parts of the pizza were fishy-er than others, but it wasn't bad).

the only notable innovation in this round of pizzas (well, i've been doing it for a while) is to cut the mozzarella into fairly thick cubes. if it's too thin, it melts too much and the oil separates giving you a greasy pizza and tasteless cheese. so cubes are best imo. shredded cheese=bad.

with tonight's pizza i received official permission to get the gas-fired pizza/bread oven :). mentioning that the current bbq had warning stickers saying not to fire up all 4 burners with the hood closed might have helped a bit too... i think the missus is not so keen on the idea of me blowing up half the house (and 90% of myself) in the quest for good pizza. (and that's a comforting thought as well)

i made 3 pies tonight, each taking about 7-8 minutes to cook at around 270-280 degrees (depending on how much you trust the thermometer on my big w bbq). before the next pizza was cooked the previous was fully consumed... i suppose that is a good sign.

pizza1.jpg

pizza2.jpg

pizza3.jpg

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I like the receding wine level. :laugh:

Good looking pies. :thumbsup:

Don't do reds with Pizza?

heh, i'm with tor on this one--cooking=license to drink (good thing i don't try to cook professionally).

reds (or beer) to be sure. the white is a warm up. :) though since i don't buy expensive wine on a regular basis, i find that cheap white is typically a hell of a lot more palatable than a cheap red. but last night i did splurge for a semi-decent shiraz.

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heh, i'm with tor on this one--cooking=license to drink (good thing i don't try to cook professionally).

reds (or beer) to be sure. the white is a warm up. :) though since i don't buy expensive wine on a regular basis, i find that cheap white is typically a hell of a lot more palatable than a cheap red. but last night i did splurge for a semi-decent shiraz.

Nice sparse toppings and good looking bread. I'm with you on the chunks of cheese. I used to use sliced buffalo mozzarella but man it's expensive.

I'm off to do some "cooking". ;):wine:

Edited by staringclown

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Nice sparse toppings and good looking bread. I'm with you on the chunks of cheese. I used to use sliced buffalo mozzarella but man it's expensive.

I'm off to do some "cooking". ;):wine:

Hehehe

Did some gym cardio after work, popped 3 Coopers without blinking at home, started cooking a Jaffna Curry and find the cat has drunk half a bottle of red after I opened it and I will have to switch to beer when the curry is finished. Its micro rat race in the kitchen when it comes to bevvies. :cheers:

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Hehehe

Did some gym cardio after work, popped 3 Coopers without blinking at home, started cooking a Jaffna Curry and find the cat has drunk half a bottle of red after I opened it and I will have to switch to beer when the curry is finished. Its micro rat race in the kitchen when it comes to bevvies. :cheers:

Any port in a storm... :beer:

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