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savagegoose

about SA's desal plant and water

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we're busily building a water desal plant here in Adel, and about 3 km down the beach we just flushed a whole load of water out of a dam, into the sea. apparently polluted dam water is to difficult to treat, well too difficult once its gone down a few water starved river beds. Anyone else see hypocricy in spending millions to desalinate sea water and flush over full dam water out sea? or am i just a nit picker?

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They complain about storm water being "too hard" to treat too. I wonder exactly what the pollutants are that are "impossible" to remove from stormwater.

Adelaide lets a LOT of its rainfall just go out to sea.

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yeah nothings been done to conserve what water we already have, apparently sewerage water must be clean and pottable, i banged on about how a rain water tank in every house piped to sewerage would save dam water. but apparently SA water dont like any old water being flushed down the toilet. they like it fresh. if u wanted a rain water tank attached to your sewer you must pay a coupla $100 a year to gt it inspected annualy by sa water to see that its clean enough.

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Hrm, not here. There's a lot of people on rainwater or mixed rainwater/mains or even bore water and we're on STEDS rather than sewer. They're not so fussy. They also sell rainwater tanks in REAL sizes as big as a house, none of this pissweak 2000L city stuff.

Incidentally, at my old town, 7 houses were supplied by SA water (mine was not one of them) at rather high cost. The water is unpotable and muddy - it isn't treated, they pump it from an open dam. Someone got it tested and it had e coli levels way higher than safe. And this is water they SELL you.

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They complain about storm water being "too hard" to treat too. I wonder exactly what the pollutants are that are "impossible" to remove from stormwater.

Adelaide lets a LOT of its rainfall just go out to sea.

I have some difficulty in getting my head around this, as I 've always seen our reservoirs as no more than storm water storages.

I would have thought that the same rules would apply. Strain off the logs, silt, stones and trash, let it settle, put it through a sand bed filter, chlorinate it if necessary and pump it to the consumers.

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I have some difficulty in getting my head around this, as I 've always seen our reservoirs as no more than storm water storages.

I would have thought that the same rules would apply. Strain off the logs, silt, stones and trash, let it settle, put it through a sand bed filter, chlorinate it if necessary and pump it to the consumers.

I think it is a question of contaminants / volume. While you have native animals (and I guess feral animals too) living in our catchment areas when it comes to suburban stormwater you have dog turds and other contaminants. Dog turds in particular is supposedly the biggest driver of poor water quality in our suburban creeks and other water courses. Perhaps this gives stormwater similar qualities to sewerage just at lower concentrations?

All that said I understand that even sewerage is cheaper to turn to potable quality than salt water and indeed tertiary treated sewerage gets pumped into creeks anyway and apparently the quality of water above and below these outlets is different only in that the treated sewerage is cleaner.

I do believe however there is a risk with the stormwater option not in the saltwater. I know I would happily drink a glass of half treated salt water than a glass of 99% treated sewerage. One the treatment process must be 100% right the other can go a bit awry and not cause huge public health issues.

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I think it is a question of contaminants / volume. While you have native animals (and I guess feral animals too) living in our catchment areas when it comes to suburban stormwater you have dog turds and other contaminants. Dog turds in particular is supposedly the biggest driver of poor water quality in our suburban creeks and other water courses. Perhaps this gives stormwater similar qualities to sewerage just at lower concentrations?

All that said I understand that even sewerage is cheaper to turn to potable quality than salt water and indeed tertiary treated sewerage gets pumped into creeks anyway and apparently the quality of water above and below these outlets is different only in that the treated sewerage is cleaner.

I do believe however there is a risk with the stormwater option not in the saltwater. I know I would happily drink a glass of half treated salt water than a glass of 99% treated sewerage. One the treatment process must be 100% right the other can go a bit awry and not cause huge public health issues.

Yes,... you may have well a point, but I feel that the difference is nowhere near as great as our Pollies would have us believe.

I feel that treated sewage though, is a different kettle of fish altogether as the degree and type of initial contamination is almost inconceivably higher and it only takes a splash of cross contamination to endanger the whole output. I'm dead against it.

Edited by Popeye

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i think it's a sh*te idea.

I find it hard to argue with logic like that.:rolleyes:

You'll keep,...

Edited by Popeye

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I think it is a question of contaminants / volume. While you have native animals (and I guess feral animals too) living in our catchment areas when it comes to suburban stormwater you have dog turds and other contaminants. Dog turds in particular is supposedly the biggest driver of poor water quality in our suburban creeks and other water courses. Perhaps this gives stormwater similar qualities to sewerage just at lower concentrations?

When I was travelling and hiking in mountains I read that you shouldn't assume mountain streams are "pure" and without contaminants. The biggest worry was that horses our cattle upstream were contaminating the water with their waste.

Popeye - do you have a septic tank? If so I'd appreciate hearing a little about your experiences with one.

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When I was travelling and hiking in mountains I read that you shouldn't assume mountain streams are "pure" and without contaminants. The biggest worry was that horses our cattle upstream were contaminating the water with their waste.

Popeye - do you have a septic tank? If so I'd appreciate hearing a little about your experiences with one.

I do have a septic tank, they are the only option in our town although the outfall from them is connected to a common effluent system which takes it to a central treatment plant a mile or so outside the town.

Plus I also have a lot of experience with septic systems in use aboard ships.

How may I help you?

Edited by Popeye

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I find it hard to argue with logic like that.:rolleyes:

You'll keep,...

i hope your post was in jest. mine certainly was, sorry if you thought it was on the nose.

welcome (back?) to the forum.

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i hope your post was in jest. mine certainly was, sorry if you thought it was on the nose.

welcome (back?) to the forum.

But of course, and Thank You for your kind welcome. :D Edited by Popeye

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